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1 



BOSTON 
PUBLIC 
UBRARY 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://archive.org/details/reportsofproceed1877bost 



REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



CITY COUNCIL OF BOSTON, 



FOR THE MUNICIPAL YEAE 1877, 



Commencing Monday, January 1st, 1877, and ending Monday, 

January 7th, 1878. 



BEING REPRINTS OF REPORTS AS PUBLISHED BY CONTRACT IN THE «' BOSTON 

EVENING TRANSCRIPT." 



[]Viiitli -A.nxixial Volume.] 




BOSTON: 

PRESS OF ROCKWELL & CHURCHILL, CITY PRINTERS. 

(REPRINTS OF REPORTS FROM THE TRANSCRIPT PRESS.) 



INTRODUCTORY NOTE. 



♦ ♦ » 



The following Index has been prepared in aocordance with 
a vote of the Committee on Printing. 

In its compilation the following topics have been omitted, 
as not essential, or as better classified for reference in 
Department offices: — 

Petitions received and referred. See City Clerk. 

Orders of notice, and hearings, unless subjects of discussion. 

See City Clerk. 
Police GfiBcers and Special Police. See Police Department. 
Truant Officers. See School Department. 
Conventions with School Committee. See City Clerk. 
Jurors. See City Clerk. 
Constables' Bonds. See City Clerk. 
Streets, damages, and betterments assessed and abated. See 

Street Commissioners and Supt. Streets. 
Streets, temporary closing, removal of obstructions, paving 

in front of estates. See Supt. Streets. 



Sewers, assessments made, abated, and postponed. See 
Sewer Department. 

Buildings, permits authorized. See Inspector of Buildings. 

Public Buildings, use of granted. See Supt. Public Buildings.^ 

Extensions of time for building. See Supt. Public Lands. 

Taxes, assessed and abated. See Assessors. 

Claims, allowed, and leave to withdraw, unless subjects of 
discussion. See Clerk of Committees. 

Leases. See Auditor of Accounts. 

Licenses to Auctioneers, Undertakers, Victuallers, Pawnbrok- 
ers, Newsboys, Bootblacks, and for Steam Engines and 
Boilers, Hoisting Beams, Cellars below grade. Storage 
of Petroleum, Stables, Carriages, Wagons, Sprinkling 
Streets, Intelligence Offices, sale of Second-hand 
Articles, Billiard Halls, Projecting Signs and Lan- 
terns, Exhibitions, etc. See City Clerk. 



INDEX. 



ORGANIZATION OF TUE CITY GOVERNMENT. 
January 1st, 1877. 

Prayer by Rov. Dr. Lothrop, 1 

Oath of office administered to Hon. Frederick 0. Prince, Mayor-elect, 
by Hon. Horace Gray, Cliief Justice of the Supreme Judicial 
Court, 1 

Oaths of office administered by Mayor to members-elect of each 
branch of City Council, 1 

Deliyery of Mayor's Inaugural Address, 1 

Samuel 1\ McCleary elected City Clerk, 4 ; Oath of office admin- 
istered by Mayor, 4 

ORGANIZATION AND REGULAR MEETINGS OE BOARD OF 
ALDERMEN. 

Board called to order by City Clerk, 1 

John T. Clark elected chaii-man, 1 

Address of chairman, 2 

Notice to Common Council of organization, 2 

Mondays, 4 1'. M., assigned for regular meetings, 2 

ORGANIZATION AND REGULAR MEETINGS OF COMMON 
COUNCIL. 

Called to order by senior member, Benjamin Pope, 1 

Credentials of members received, and quorum reported, 1 

Notice to Mayor and Aldermen, of quorum present, 1 

Benjamin Pope elected President, 1 

Address of President, 1 

Washington P. Gregg elected Clerk, 4 

Oath of office administered to Clerk by City Solicitor, 4 

Notice to Board of Aldermen of organization, 4 

Thursday evenings, half-past 7, assigned for regular meetings, 4 

ALPHABETICAL INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF BOARD OF 
ALDERMEN AND COMMON COUNCIL. 

[Preceding the figures indicating page, a signifies Aldermen, c 

Common Council.'] 
Advertising — 

Order requiring payment by petitioners, referred, a 20 ; report, 
order passed, a S3 

Expediency of placing in charge of Supt. of Printing, referred, 
c 532, a 533 
Annexation — 

SomerviUe, resolve passed, inexpedient, a 20, c 23 
Appropriations — 

Auditor's Estimates, see heading Auditor of Accounts. 

Oliver-street Improvement, transfers, c 36, 48, a 54 

$5,000 to Austin Farm, a 93, c 95, c 122 

Sf2,000 for furniture Grammar School, Florence District, c 95, 
a 100 

$4,500 additional for printing, c 124, a 130 

«6,000 for Common, etc., c 139, a 148 

$500 for Board of Aldermen, c 139, a 148 

$39,231.74 Washington and Essex St. widening, c 141, a 148 

$28,000 for school expenses, c 141, a 148 

i3,.500for salaries, officers. School Committee, c 141, a 148 

$19,000 for Neponset bridge, c 141, a 148 

$8,000 for Mt. Washington bi-idge, c 141, a 149 

$5,000 for Back Bay improvement, c 160, a 171 

$20,000 for Northampton-street District, a 305, c 324 

$3,000 for repairing Quincy Hall, a 305 

$10,000 for Branch Library, AT. Rox., c 355 

$2,000 for Vacation Schools — see Schools. 

$2,000 for Play-grounds, a 364, c 382 

$4,600 for Survey and Inspection of Buildings, a 491, c 494 

$2,100 for Sealers Weights and Measures, a 556 

$1,400 to Sealers Weights and Measures, a 596, c 603, 621 

$16.31 for Free Concerts, a 689, c C90, 70 

$434.76 to New Lunatic Hospital, c 676, a 681, c 690, a 697 

$15,000 to Common, etc., c 691, a 697 

$3,000 for Park Department, a 782, c 804 

$1,000 for Social ],aw Library, a 782, c 804 

$2,000 for Registration of Voters, c 743, a 744, c 770, 789, 
a 795 



$10,000 for Incidental Expenses, c 835, a 840 
$600 for Contingent Fund, Board of Aldermen, c 835, a S40 
$12,000 for Northampton-st. District, c 835, a 840 
$1,426 for Back Bay streets, c 849, a 853 
$] ,500 for Registration of Voters, c 835, a 840 
Armories — see Militia. 
Army and Navy Monument — 

Order offered, c 7 ; passed, committee appointed, c 15, a 17 

Report, a 321 ; order passed, a 321, c 324, 431, 440, a 449 

Tender of escort, referred, a 483 

Celebration, orders passed, a 598, c 603 

Extra pay for Police and Firemen, c 608, 621 

Memorial — see Printing. 

Vote of thanks, a 617, c 620 

Pay for watching the Monument, a 633, c 634 

Biackstone square accident, committee to investigate, a 610, 

620 ; i-eport, a 645 ; report accepted, hearing, a 660, c 669 ; 

report on claims for personal injuries, c 743 
$8,100 extra to Martin Milmore, c 814, 835, a 840 
Assessors' Department — 

Commission on Valuation, c 40, 48 : laid on table, a 54 ; rejected, 

a 306 
Abolishing Second Assistant Assessors, a 69, c 72, 95, 98 
Ordinance relating to duties of assistants referred, c 149 j laid 

on table, c 158 ; indefinitely postponed, c 315 
Resignation of Ira D. Davenport, a 224 
Validity of election of Second Assistant Assessor's, referred 

c254 
$200 for extra services, a 795, c 803 
$500 for extra services, a 795, c 803 
Auditor of Accounts — 

Monthly Exhibits, Jan., 9 ; Feb., 55 ; March, 135 ; April, 219 ; 

May, 320 ; Juno, 391 ; July, 490; Aug. 580; Sept. 696; Oct. 

641; Nov. c720; Dec, 778 
Estimates for 1877-8 referred, c 136, a 148 ; report, c 219 ; orders 

passed, c 228, a241, c 253, a 261, c 270 
Authorized to make closing transfers of appropriations, c 141, 

a 149 
Order to print annual report, a 805, c 308 
Statement of leases of city property, a 320 
Annual report, c 462 

Public inspection of Bills, c 693, referred, c 701, a 704, 717 ; re- 
port, 814, 829 ; indefinitely postponed, a 840 • 

Badges — 

Order offered, c 15 ; passed, c 23 ; report of Committee, c 140 
Ballast Lighters — 

Quarterly report, a 9, 214, 490, 620 
Barnard, Ward 24 — remarks : 

Joint Rules and Orders, 290 

Official report, 360 

Public Parks, 481 

School Sessions, 638 

Investigation on Common, etc., 672 

Appointment of Inspector of Buildings, 723 

Commercial-st. widening, 752 
Barry, Ward 22 — remarks : 

Election of Directors for Public Institutions, 16 

Pensions for Police, 159 

Salaries, 160 

3Ir. Keith's appointment to Board of Health, 256 

License Commissioners, 288 

Contracts only to tax-payers, 355 

Stony Brook, 718 

Small-pox Hospital, 777 
Beeching, Ward 1 — remarks : 

Election of Ferry Directors, 16 

Unifoi-m for Fire Commissioners, 50 

Candidates for city offices, 63 

Salaries of city officers, 164, 190 

Mystic Valley Sewer, 404, 427 

Army and Navy Monument, 441 

Salaries of employes of Water Board, 467 

Free Ferries, 496, 520 

Historical Sites, 792 
Blanchard, Ward 21 — remarks : 

Salaries, 163 
Blodgett, "Ward 8 — remarks : 

I'ay of street laborers, 59 



IV 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Stony Brook Improvement, 381 
Visit to Sudbury River, 430 
Army and Navy Monument, 441 
Improved Sewerage, 530, 559 
Sealers of Weights and Measures, 546 
Bonds of city officers — 

Of Supt. of Market approved, a 214 
Of Sealer of TVeights and Measures approved, a 226 
Order passed for annual examination, a 396, c 403 
Of City Treasurer approved, 782 
Annual examination, a 848, c 846 
Boston and Albany R. R. — 

Temporary tracks in Commonwealth ave., a 172 
Boston and Lowell Railroad — 

Additional track on Mj'stic wharf authorized, a 717 
Boston and Maine R. R. — 

Appointment of extra police, a 72 
Boston, Winthrop & Point Shirley R. R. 

Assessment of damages, a 432, 533 
Breck, Alderman — remarks : 

Sealers of Weights and Bleasures , 300 
Salary of Inspector at Abattoir, 319, 334 
Supt. of permits for occupation of parts of streets, 43T 
Police Sergeant Clark, 493 ^ 

Mystic Valley Sewer, 472 
Western avenue, Brighton, 491 
Police-boat " Protector ", 629 
Refreshments, etc., 685 
Police Rules and Regulations, 706, 840 
Congress-st. widening, 854 
Bridges — 

Reports of Superintendents, a 9, 17 

Annual Report of Commissioner, a 30 

Meridian-st., closed for repairs, a 56 

Contract for lumber authorized, a 102 

Charles-river, closed for repairs: $700 authorized for repairs, 

a 226 
Longwood-avenue, notice and request from Brookline, referred, 

a 277 
Broadway, closed for examination, a 297 ; repairs, a 587 
Congress-street, closed for examination, 297 
Chelsea, releases of claims, a 364; referred, c 381, a 506 ; repairs 

authorized, a 41.3, c 479, 497 
Cottage-street, agreement with N. Y. & N. E. R. Co. authorized, 

a 338, c 352, 383 
Charles river, examination ordered, c 504, a 506 ; report, c 608 ; 

referi'ed, a Gil 
Huntington avenue, widening, a 338 
Longwood avenue, rebuilding, a 430 
Warren, repairs authorized, a 297, 474, 510, 587 
Berkeley and Ferdinand streets, over Boston & Albany Rail- 
road, order passed to strengthen, a 536 
Columbus avenue, rebuilding, a 536 
Chelsea, closed for repairs, a 556 
Chelsea, access granted, a 682 ; notice from Chelsea referred, a 

602 
Western avenue, rebuilding draw-pier, a 582 
Mt. Washington avenue, rebuilding draw -pier, a 582 ; replank 

draw, repair sidewalk, a 598 
Longwood avenue, closed for rebuilding, a 583 
Neponset, rebuilding, a 598 : closed for repairs, a 617 
From Commercial point to Squaiitum, a 611, c 621, a 626, 698, 

824, 828, 848 
Huntington avenue, planking, fences, a 587, c 621 
Albany street, closed for repairs, 646 
Broadway, closed for repairs, 700 
Brintnall, Ward 5 — remnrks : 
Candidates for city ofSces, 63 
License Commissioners, 385 
Army and Navy Monument, 445 
Public Parks, 504 

Sealers of Weights and Measures, 546 
Surveyors of Highways, 816 

Brown, Ward 23 — remarks : 
Salaries of city ofScers, 140 
Public Parks, 603 
Refreshments, etc., 532 
Police-boat "Protector", 686 
Stony Brook, 718, 748 
Curbstone Fruit-venders, 848 

Buildings — see also Public Buildings. 

Annual report of Inspector, a 30 

Order relating to unoccupied buildings rejected, 306 

Inspector requested to report on means of egress from school- 
houses, etc., c 315, 328, 359 ; indefinitely postponed, a 363 

Semi-annual report of Inspector, a 490 

Committee requested to consider sufficiency of appropriation, 
c 446, a 449 ; report, a 472, c 478, a 491, c 494 

Hotel Fred, c 431, 447 

Inspecting storage of gunpowder, c 481, 467 

Occupation of streets for building, order referred, a 437 ; report, 
order referred, a 450, c 460 ; report, 490 ; order passed, 
a 512; referred , c 513 ; non-concurrence, a 535; adherence, 
c 546 ; concurrence and reference, a 554 ; report, c 568 ; 
ordinance passed, c 621, a 627 

Building permits during recess, a 491, c 494 

Expediency of ordinance for snow-guards referred, a 556, o 567 

Charges against an Inspector, referred, a 612 ; report, a 658 



Petition of Charles-street Baptist Society tor compensation for 
repairs, referred, a 616 
Burke, Ward 2 — remarks : 

Rates of toll on East Boston Ferries, 26 

Uniform for Fire Commissioners, 49 

Abolition of Assistant Assessors, 99 

Salaries, 164, 191 

Second Assistant As.^essors, 254 

East Boston Ferries, 271 

Mystic Valley Sewer, 331 

Management of Fire Boat, 387 

Repairs on Adams School-house, 466 

Free Ferries, 522 

Refreshment bills, etc., 676 

Appointment of Inspector of Buildings, 701. 721 

Fire Commissioners, 731 

Employes on Fire-boat, 778, 794 

Payment for extra services in Assessors' Depiirtmeut, 803 
Burnham, Alderman — remarks: 

Consolidation of City Registrar and BoarJ of Health, 86 

Salaries, 104 

Confirming nominations of city officers. 197 

Ninth-street improvement, and work for laborers, 202, 390, 448 

Appropriation Bill, 242 

South Boston R. R., 249 

Middlesex R. K.,266 

Registrar of Voters, 316, 351 

License Commissioners, 350 

Vacation Schools, 362 

Public Parks, 365, 421, 476 

Salary of Supt. of Dover-street Bridge, 391 

Vacation for firemen, 391, 506, 551 

Asphalt pa.vement, 397 

Poland & Pcabody's Omnibus Line, 898 

Mystic Valley Sewer, 425 

Salary Supt. Public Library, 468 

Police Sergeant Clark, 493 

Free Ferries, 489 

Occupation of streets for building, 554 

Purchase of estate of Mrs. Ellis, 556 

Northampton St. Dist., 597 

Improved Sewerage, 569, 640, 646,799, 841 

Inspection of Lime, 599 

Constables, 609 • 

Blackstone square accident, 610, 664 

East Boston High School, 649 

Refreshments, etc., 685 

Investigation of Fire Commissioner, 681 

Plan to relieve the blockade, 697 

South Boston Railroad location, 698 

Police Rules and Regulations, 706 

Vegetable market, 713 

Roxbury Canal, 759, 763, 78G 

Seventeenth location Middlesex Railroad, 745 

Closing Proceedings, 856 

Cambridge Railroad — ^ 

Petition for track in Merrimac street, a 644 : liearing, 697, 703 

Change of track on 'SV'ashington street, Brighton, a 682 

Location in Milk St., a 843, 856 
Cemeteries — 

Mount Hope, annual report, a 353 

Cedar Grove, annual report, a 449 

Boston Catholic Cemetery, land allotted, a 451 

St. Joseph's Cemetery, permit to open burial lot, a 823, e 827 
City Architect — 

Authorized to employ assistants, c 275, a 277 
City Clerk — 

Quarterly report, a 64, 296, 685, 745 
City Council — 

Official report of proceedings authorized, c 859, a 363 
City Contracts — 

Contracts to citizens only, c 832, 355, a 863 
City Engineer — 

Authorized to purchase supplies, etc., c 26, 36, a 41 

Annual report, c 50 

Authorized to visit Europe, c 685, a 640 
City Hospital — 

Authorized to occupy stable, a 266, c 270 

Annual report, c 543, a 555 
City Laborers — 

On Mystic Vailey Sewer — see Water 

Report from Street Commissioners on work for unemployed 
laborers, referred, a 11, c 13 

Pay of street laborers, order rejected, c 59, 74 

Expediency of providing work for poor citizens referred, c 60 

Expediency of paying semi-montlily , order offered, c 194 ; re- 
ferred, c 206, a 211 ; report inexpedient, c 295, a 296 

Laborers in Paving Department, c 409, a 412 

Discharge of laborers in Paving Department, a 611, 667, 699 

Order to pay Nov. 28, 1877, a 762, c 7T0 
City Ofiicers (elected or appointed) — 

City Clerk, c 4 

Mayor's Clerk, a 8 

Assistant City Clerk, a 9 

Trustees Mt. Hope Cemetery, c 14, a 17, 179. c 183 

Trustees City Hospital, c 15, a 17, 148, c 158, a 202 

Directors Public Institutions, c 15, a 17, 179, c 183 

Directors East Boston Ferries, c 23, a 29, c 217, a 223 



INDEX TO rKOCEEDINGS OF CITr COUNCIL. 



Trustees Public Library, c 23. a 29, c 35, a 215. c 217 

Public Weighers, a 17, 146, 210, 237, 258, 277, 296, 361, 448, 819 

Weighers of Coal, 41, 80, 100, 146, 223, 316, 411, 432, 468, 483, 505, 

569, 781 
City Messenger, a 56, c 58 
Superintendent Public Buildings, c 96, a 215 
Assessors, c 96, a 179, ,c 183, a 202, c 206, a 215, c 21 7, a 223, c 228 
Superintendent of Streets, c 96, a 215 
City Engineer, c 96, a 215 
Superintendent Public Lands, c 96, a 215 
Superintendent Sewers, c 96, a 215 
City Solicitor, c 96, a 215 
Clerk of Committees, c 97, a 202 
Superintendent Public Grounds, c 97, a 215 
Water Registrar, c 97, a 215 
City Surveyor, c 97, a 215 

Weighers and Inspectors of Lighters, c 123, a 130 
Overseers of Poor, c 123, a 130 
Measurers of Grain, a 196 
Measurers of Wood and Bark, a 196, 237, 361 
Undertakers, a 196, 237, 277, 381, 585, 640, 657 
Inspectors of Petroleum and Coal Oils, a 196 
Supt. of Wagons, a 196 
Supt. of Hacks and Carriages, a 196 
Supt. of Intelligence Offices, a 196, 593 
Sealer of Weights and Measures, a 196 
Svipt. of Pawnbrokers, a 196 
Supt. of Paneuil Hall .Market, a 197 
Inspector of Provisions, a 197 
Supt. of Faneuil Hall, a 197 
Assistant City Messengers, a 198, c 206 
Supts. of Bridges, c 206, a 215, c 217, a 223, 252 
Supt. of Hay Scales, a 210 
Surveyors of Marble, a 210 
City Registrar, a 215, c 217 
Inspectors of Lime, a 214, c 217, 257, a 258 
Culler of Hoops and Staves, a 214, c 217 
Field Drivers and Pound Keepers, a 214, c 217, -332, a 337, 436, 

c 440 a 646 c 651 
Fence Viewers, a 214, c 217, a 226, c 228, 332, a 337 
Commissioner Cedar Grove Cemetery, a 215, c 217 
City Architect, a 215, c 217 
Harbor Master, a 215, c 217 

First Assistant Assessors, a 215, c 217, a 223, c 228 
AVeigher and Inspector of Bundle Hay, a 196, 223, 237, 258 
Commissioner on Cambridge Bridges, a 223 
Commissioner on Sinking Funds, a 224, c 228, a 238, c 253, a 258, 

c 270, 407, a 412 
Prison Point Bridge Commissioner, a 223, c 228 
Measurers of Upper Leather, a 237, 258, 744 
Member of Water Board, a 237, c 253 
Park Commissioner, a 237, c 253 

Member Board of Health, a 237, c 253, 255, a 258, c 271, 293, 310 
Second Assistant Assessors, a 238, c 254, a 258, c 270, a 278, c 236 
Assistant Clerk of Committees, c 274, a 277 
License Commissioners, a 277, c 286 
Inspector of Milk, a 316 
Fire Commissioners, a 316, 351, 352 
Registrar of Voters, a 316, 351 
Assistants to Bridge Supts., a 323 
Superintendent of Lamps, a 334, 380, 398 
Auditor of Accounts, c 386, a -391 
Deputy Sealers of Weights and Measures, 392 
City Collector, 445 
City Treasurer, 445 

Inspectors of Elections, a 624, 640, 657, 695, 744, 759, 763 
Inspector of Buildings, a 695, o 701, 720, 724 
Inspector and Weigher of Hay, 781 
City Registrar — 

Annual report, a 55, 641 
Consolidation with Board of Health, a 71, 86 
City Scales — 

Quarterly report North Scales, a 9, 225, 580, 658 
City Solicitor — see Law Department. 
Citj' Surveyor — 

Annual report, a 18 

Authorized to purchase supplies, etc., a 19, c 35 
Claims — 

Payments of executions or judgments of courts authorized, a 47, 

c48 
Sundry bills presented for authorit}' to pay, a 47, o 48, a 102, 

ci39, 208, 221,a223, c635 
Abatement of claim against Hiram Johnson, referred, a 52, 

c 58 ; report, order passed, c 142, a 149 
Of Louise Woodworth Foss, c 124, a 130 
Robert Stoddard AVylde, stolen bonds, referred, c 100 ; report, 

order passed, a l98, c 206 
Defective tax-titles, ordinance passed, c 530, a 533 
$1,000 to Erving F. Graves, a 580, c 603 
$1,.500 to Annie E. Porter, c 691, 701, a 704 
John Raddin, a 825, c 827, a 840 
§1,0(10 to Patrick Horan, c 834, a 840 
Clark, Alderman — 

Elected chairman, 2; address, 2 

Remarks on : Retrenchment in expenditures, 11, 102 

Union Freight Railroad, 46 

Management of Sinking Funds, 80, 106, 146, 157, 176 

Exhibition on the Counnon, 111 



Tracks on Columbus ave., 156, 173 

Protection of burial-grounds, 157 

List of jurors, 157 

System of taxation, 175 

Elections, 179 

Care of truants, 210 

Play -ground on Common, 211 

Furnishing play -grounds, 214 

First Assistant Assessors, 224 

Fruit-stands in streets, 239, 265 

Fourth of July, 240 

Appi-opriation Bill, 242 

Boats on Public Garden pond, 248 

East Boston Ferries, 259, 658 

Charles-river Park, 268 

Joint rules and orders, 279 

Vacation schools, 281, 362, 890 

Salary of Inspector of Provisions, 285, 320, 334 

Sealers of Weights and Measures, 298, 426, 436, 467, 510 

Vacant stores and tenements, 307 

Registrar of Voters, 316, 351 

Petition for new Gas Co., 318 

Refreshment bills, 319 

Army and Navy Monument, 322 

English High and Latin Schools, 322 

Board of Health, 323 

Public Parks, 349, 371, 417, 439, 474, 534, 821 

Play-grounds, 350 

License Commissioners, 350, 617, 643 

Wales-street drainage, 379 

Police for bath-houses, 380 

Building of Ninth street, 390 

Work of Mystic Valley Sewer, 424, 457 

Asph.alt pavement, 395, 456 

Poland & Peabody's Omnibus Line, 400 

Public School Musical Exhibitions, 402 

Superintendent of permits for occupation of parts of st reets, 438, 

554 
Ninth street, 448 

Salary of Superintendent Public Library, 470 
Free Ferries, 489 
Police Sergeant Clark, 492 
Commercial- street widening, 507, 629, 839 
Vacation for firemen, 507, 552 
Free access to horse-railroad cars, 511 
Salary of City Engineer, 533 
Proposed visit cf governors, 536 
Horse-car blockades, 539, 584. 644 
Purchase of estate of Mrs. Ellis, 556 
Improved Sewerage, 577, 647 
Limit of City indebtedness, 590 
Constables, 609, 626 
Rejection of policeman, 614 
Printing Army and Navy Memorial, 616 
Blackstone square accident, 667 
Laborers on public grounds, 658 

Investigation of Department of Common, etc., 658, 687 
Refreshments, etc., 686 
Vegetable Market, 716 
Metropolitan Railroad, 728, 746, 837 
Small-pox Hospital, 781 
Industrial School, 782 
Roxbury Canal, 787 

Metropolitan Railroad location, in. Washington St., 822 
Claim of John Raddin, 825 
Management of horse-railroads, 845 
Police rules and regulations, 840 
Congress-st. widening, 853 
Response to resolution of thanks, 862 
Clarke, Ward 22 — remarks : 

Retrenchment in expenditures, 13 

Election of city officers, 15 

Badges, 23 

Personal explanation, 25 

Documents for Social Law Library, 36 

Salaries and duties of city officers, 38, 161, 186, 828 

Regulation of quacks, 39 

Petition of James Deshon, 48, 

Uniform for Fire Commissioners, 49 

Uniform system of valuation, 48 

Work for poor citizens, 62 

Boards and commissions, 63, 74 

Sinking Funds, 183 

Bills for furnishing supplies, 118 

Mechanics' Fair and the Common, 125 

Pensions for Police, 145, 159 

Care of Public Grounds, 159 

New building at Deer Island, 270 

Fourth of July, 273 

License Commissioners, 287, 352, 651 

Mystic Valley Sewer, 308, 330, 428 

Ventilation of Council Chamber, 312 

Duties of Board of Health, 324 

Cottage-street bridge, 352 

Contracts only to citizens, 356 

Stony-brook Improvement, 381 

Salary of Superintendent of Dover-sti'eet bridge, 382, M3 

Releases on Winship place, 382 



VI 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Vacation for firemen, 386 
Drainage of Muddy brook, 887 

Fire corner Shawmut avenue and Pleasant street, 408 
Visit to Sudbury river, 357, 409, 430 
Buildings to be inspected, 431 
Salaries of employes of Water Board, 467 
Storage of gunpowder, 467 
Sale of Atherton School building, 613 
Free Ferries, 523 
Improved Sewerage, 530, 561 
Sealers of Weigtits and Measures, 545 
Occupancy of streets for building, 547 
Extra pay for Sept. 17, 621 
"Wines, etc. at city entertainments, 689 
Duties of City Officers, 656 
Hiring rooms in Pemberton sqiiare, 669, 690 
Appointment of Inspector of Buildings, 722 
Stone-cutting business at the Islands, 748 
Commercial-st. widening, 752, 793 
Small-pox Hospital, 777 

Payment for extra services in Assessors' Department, 803 
Annual Dinner of Council, 815 
Reduction of rent to T. W. Carter, 803 
Squantum bridge, 828, 848 ^ 

Coe, Ward 23 — remarks : 
Sinking Funds, 122 
Salaries of city officers, 183 
Appropriation Bill, 230 
Second Assistant Assessors, 270 
Police for License Commissioners, 354 
Stony-brook Improvement, 381 
Army and Navy Monument, 441 
Repairs on Adams School-house, 466 
Salaries of employes of Water Board, 467 
Public parks, 478, 524 
Vacations for firemen, 541 
Additional appropriation for Common, 634 
Refreshments, etc., 673 
Stony-brook, 718 

Appointment of Inspector of Buildings, 724 
Small-pox Hospital, 777 
Condition of School-houses, 779 
Collector's Department — 

Report on estates sold for assessments, c. 59 

Extra clerk -hire authorized, 280 

$3,800 for clerk-hire, 310 

Annual report referred, c 357, a 363 ; report of Committee on 

Examination, c 445, a 449 
$4(10 for extra services, c 835, a 840 
$300 for extra services, c 835, a 840 
Committees — 

Order for appointment of Joint Special Committees to nominate 

candidates for city offices, c 4, c 6, a 8 
Committee on Finance elected, c 5 ; organized, c 14 
Committee on Accounts elected, c 5, a 8 ; organized, c 14 
Joint Standing Committees, c 6, a 8 
Standing Committees of Board of Aldermen, a 8 
Standing Committees of Common Council, o 7 
Order rejected relating to candidates for city offices, c 63 
Orders passed for nominations to be made, a 134 
Special Committees appointed — 

State Aid, a 2, c 5 

Rules and orders Board of Aldermen, 3 

Joint rules and orders, a 3 

Disposal of topics in Mayor's Addi-ess, c 4, a 8 

Nominating committees appointed, c 4, c 6, a 8 

Rules and orders of Common Council, c 6 

Retrenchment in expenditures, a 10, c 13 

Army and Navy Monument, c 15, a 17 

Badges, c 25 

Historic points, a 46, c 48 

Public Parks, c 26, a 47 

Improved sewerage, c 26, a 47 

Franklin Fund, a 33, 41 

Auditor's Estimates, c 136, a 148 

Seventeenth of June, o 206, a 211 

East Boston Ferry Investigation, c 271 

Fourth of July, c 274, a 277 

Stony-brook Improvement, a 365, c 381, a 395 

Bonds of city officers, a 395, c 403 

Inspection of Prisons, a 412 

Evening concerts, c 460, a 472 

Industrial Schools, a 484, c 494 

Proposed visit of Governors of States, a 505, c 513 

Superintendent of Pawnbrokerage Investigation, 506 

Excursion of Council, e 530 

Inspection of Lime, 598 

Blackstone-square accident, a 609, c 620; report, 743 
' Investigation of Department of Common and Squares, c 

656, a 658 

State Election Returns, 709 

Stony-brook Improvement, a 732 

Small-pox Hospital, 748, 778, 781 

Municipal Election Returns, 784 
Nominations by special Committees — 

Trustees Mt. Hope, c 14, a 17, 175 

Trustees City Hospital, c 15, a 17, c 142, a 148 

Directors for Public Institutions, c 15, a 17, 175, 183 



Directors East Boston Ferries, t- 15, a 30 

Trustees Public Library, c 15, a 29, c 207 

Assessors, a 46 

City Solicitor, c 51, a 54 

Superintendent of Sewers, c 51, a 51 

Clerk of Committees, c 51, a 54 

City Engineer, c 51. a 54 

Superintendent of Common, etc., c 5! , a 54 

Superintendent of Public Lauds, c 51, a 54 

Water Registrar, c 51, a 54 

City Surveyor, c 51, a 54 

Superintendent of Streets, c 51 , a 54 

City Messenger, a 56, c 58 

Superintendent of Public Buildings, a 56, c 58 

Inspectors of Lighters, a 94, c 95 

Overseers of Poor, c 97, a 100 

Superintendents of Bridges, c 194, a 197, 252 

First Assistant Assessors, a 198, c 206, a 224 

City Architect, c 207 

Harbor Master, c 207 

Directors E. B. Ferries, c 207 

Commissioner Cedar Grove Cemetery, c 207 

City Registrar, c 207 

Fence Viewers, a 214, c 217 

Culler of Hoops and Staves, a 214, c 217 

Inspector of Lime, a 214, c 217 

Field Drivers and Pound Keepers, a 214, c 217 

Sinking Fund Commissioner, c 222 

Second Assistant Assessors, a 226, c 228 

Auditor of Accounts, c 386 

Deputy Scalers Weights and Measures, a 392 

City Treasurer, 445 

City Collector, 445 
Common Council — 

Admission to ante-room, 6 

Strangers excluded from tioor and ante-room , c 208 

Order to supply members with Cushing's large Manual, an 

English Grammar, and a dictionary, c 332, 356 
Excursion, order rejected, c 482 ; reconsideration, c 504 ; com- 
mittee appointed, c 530 
Annual Dinner, c 815, 833 
Common and Public Grounds — 
$1,200 for labor, c 36, a 41 

$6,000 additional appropriation, c 97, a 100, c 139 
Land on Dartmouth and Boylston streets, committee authorized 

to confer, a 47, c 48 
Mass. Charitable Mechanic Association, petition referred, a 41 ; 

petitions in aid and remonstrances, a 57 ; report, recom- 
mitted, a 57, c 58; report, order passed, a 111; substitute 

order passed, c 125; non-concurrence, a 130; indefinite 

postponement, c. 137 
Order passed relating to care by City Council, a 134, c 139 ; 

reconsideration refused, c 159 
$5,500 for labor, c 139, a 148 

Expediency of providing play-ground referred, c 208 ; a 214 
Play-ground, order passed, c 208 ; indefinitely postponed, a 211 ; 

order passed, c 314, 326, a 350, 364, c 882 
$2,000 for squares on Commonwealth ave., a 227, c 228, 255 
Huntington avenue square, report a 240, c 253 
Boats on Public-Garden pond, a 248, c 253 
Supt. authorized to purchase supplies and employ men, c 275, 

a 277 
$34.25 for sewer, a 279 
Expediency of railing round Fort Hill square referred, c 315, 

a 318 
Order passed for protection of plants, a 351 
Fence on Commonwealth avenue authorized, c 386, a 389 
$628.76 for Commonwealth-avenue sqxiare, a 413. c 440 
Stealing flowers from Public Garden, a 474, c 478, 497, a 660, 

682, c 690 
Expediency of fountain in Madison square, a 490 
Evening concerts, c 446, 460, a 472, 689 
Orchard park, order rejected, c 550 
Additional appropriation, a 632, c 634, 654, 669, a 687, c 691, a 

697 
Proposed removal of Supt., laid on table, c 655 ; indefinitely 

postponed, c 835 
Investigating Committee appointed, c 656, a 658 ; report, c 770, 

805, a 820 
Employment of laborers, c 656, a 658 

Expediency of placing public grounds in care of Park Commis- 
sioner, c 678, 692 
$352.50 for Phonographic Report of Hearings, c 770 
Contingent Expenses (see also " Auditor of Accounts") — 
Of Board of Aldermen : approval of bills authorized, a 102 
Of Common Council : discussion, 98 ; order passed, 142 
Refreshments and carriage-hire, c 532, 544, 550, 743, 773, 766, 

788, 835, a 842, c 846, 849, a 853 
Wines at city entertainments, c 639, 653, a 658, c 673, a 682 
Public Inspection of Refreshment Bills, c 676, a 682 
Constables — see County of Suffolk. 
County of SufColk — 

Repairs and furniture for county buildings authorized, a 19, 29 
Jail expenses : for Jan., 45 ; Feb., 101 ; March, 198 ; May, 363 ; 
June, 450; July, 535; Aug. 585 ; Sept. 612 ; Oct. 698; Nov. 
761 ; Dec. 820 
Investigation of constables, c 98, a 100 ; report, a 612, c 620 
Inspection of Prisons, a 412, 586, 855 



INDEX TO TROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



VII 



Registry of Deeds, index of estates sold for non-payment of 

taxes authorized, a 401 
Appointments of Constaljles, a 593, 609, 612, 621, 703, 763, 795, 

819, 837 
Old Records of Courts, communication referred, a 626 
CroeVcer, Ward 9 — remarlcs : 
Badges, 24 
' Rates of toll on East Boston Ferries, 26 

Management of sinking funds and city debt, 26, 119, 140, 143, 

181, 208, 218 
Documents for Social Law Library, 86 
Work for poor citizens, 62 
Boards and commissions, 74 
Abolition of Second Assistant Assessors, 95 
Common Council refreshment bills, 98 
Bills for furnishing supplies, 118 
Claim of Louise Woodworth Foss, 124 
Mechanics' Fair and the Common, 125, 138 
Appropriation for Public Grounds, 139 
Salaries of city officers, 140, 184, 188, 828 
Contingent Fund, 142 
Play -ground on Common , 209 
Appropriation Bill, 228 
Certificates of firemen, 253 

Mr. Keith's appointment to Board of Health, 26S, 273, 293, 311 
License Commissioners, 286, 353, 385, 652 
Joint Riiles and Orders, 292 
Mystic Valley Sewer, 310, 329, 407 
Ventilation of Council Chamber, 313 
Police for License Commissioners, 354 
Contracts only to citizens, 355 
Civilities to distinguished strangers, 357 
Official report, 359 
Releases on Winship place, 383 
Fence on Commonwealth avenue, 386 
Salary Superintendent Dover-street bridge, 403 
Laborers in Paving Department, 410 
Duties of Retrenchment Committee, 410, 429 
Army and Navy Monument, 443 
Salaries of employes of Water Board, 467 
Storage of gunpowder, 467 
Public Parks, 481, 815, 817 
Vacation for firemen, 495, 541 
Free Ferries, 495 
Improved Sewerage, 530 
Refreshments, etc., 513 
Proposed visit of Governors, 540 
Scalers of Weights and Measures, 545, 567 
Northampton St. District, 603 
Inspection of Lime, 605 
Extra Pay for September 17, 608, 621 
Messenger for Treasury Department, 620 
Police Boat " Protector," 622, 636 

Additional Appropriation for Common, 634, 654, 672, 691 
Removal of Superintendent Common, 656 
Refreshments, etc., 673, 676, 774, 835 
Investigation of Fire Commissioners, 677 
Opportunity for city employees to vote, 692 
Inspection of bills in Auditor's office, 693 
Appointment of Inspector of Buildings, 721,738 
Payment of Carriage bills, 770 
Small-pox Hospital, 777 
Commercial-st. widening, 804, 830 
Common Investigation, 805 
Annual Dinner of Council, 815, 833 
Reduction of rent to T. W. Carter, 803 



Danforth, Ward 10 — remarks : 

Salaries and duties of city officers, 87, 161, 192 

Salary of Superintendent of Dover-street bridge, 381 

Army and Navy Monument, 431, 441 

Sealers of Weights and Measures, 494, 513, 545, 567 

Free Ferries, 621 

Improved Sewerage, 565 

Messenger for Treasury Department, 620 

License Commissioners, 651, 676 

A'cgetable Market, 719 

Cojimercial-st. widening, 752, 804 

Annual Dinner of Council, 815 
Day , Ward 4 — remarks : 

Salaries and duties of city officers, 39, 40, 140 

Abolition of Assistant Assessors, 73, 95 

Old South preservation, c 194 

Appropriation Bill, 229 

Mr. Keith's appointment to Board of Health, 256 

Acceptance of Mercantile Library, 275 

Joint Rules and Orders, 292 

Mystic Valley Sewer, 809, 330 

Horatio Harris estate for park, 326 

Contracts only to tax-payers, 333, 355 

Official report. 359 

Improved !-ewerage, 530, 566 

llefrcsliments, etc., 532 

Inspection of Lime, 607 

Laborers on Public Grounds, 6.50 

Personal explanation, 679 

t'onimcrcial-st widening, 804 



Dee, Ward 5 — remarks : 

Salaries and duties of city officers, 37 
Dogs — 

Expediency of muzzling, referred, a 94, c 95 ; report, orders 
referred, a 323, c 324 ; report, a 392 ; order passed, a 4oS, 659 

Order passed to kill unlicensed dogs, a 682 

Damage for fowls killed, a 726, 842 
Duggan, Ward 12 — remarks : 

Vacation of Firemen, 494 
Dunbar, Alderman — remarks : 

Salary of Inspector of Provisions, 285 

License Commissioners, 643. 

Claim of John Raddin, 825 

Elections — 

Petitions for recounts of votes for councilmen, referred, c 4, 5 
Report on recount of Ward 20, Joseph Morrill, jr., elected and 

qualified, c 5 
Reports on recounts of Wards 16, 6,4, 19,15, '3, c 5 ; Ward 8, cl4 
Petitions for recounts for ward officers, referred, a 12 ; report, 

a 19 
Warrants issued for State Election, a 660 
Opportunity for city employes to vote, c 692, a 097, 784 
Report of Returns, State, a 726, 745 
Warrants for Municipal Election, 747 
Report of Returns, Blunicipal, 797, 823 

Fagan, Ward 19 — remarks : 

Salaries of city officers, 140 (see errata, page 222) 
Mystic Valley Sewer, 330 
Contracts only to citizens, 356 
Appointment of Inspector of Buildings, 723 
Felt, Ward 18 — remarks : 

Common Council refreshment bills, 98 
Contingent Fund, 142 
Myotic Valley Sewer, 809 
Ventilation of Council Chamber, 313 
Horatio Harris estate for park, 325 
Contracts only to tax-payers, 333 
Cottage-street bridge, 352 
Additional Appropriation for Common, 634 
Release of land to heirs of .John English, 701 
South Boston Flats, 719 
Historic sites, 789 
Stony brook, 793 
Ferries — 

Expediency of changing rates of toll, referred, c 26, a 29 
Investigation of management, c 255, a 268, c 271, a 277, c 445, 

a 449 
Petitions for free ferries referred, a 237, 317, c 328 ; report, 

a 473 ; order passed, a 484, c 495, 514, 532 
Annual report, a 337, 395 
Notice from Mayor of legal proceedings, a 057 
Records of the Ferries, c 742 
Mandamus from Supreme Court, 820, c 827 
Fire Department — 

Report of fires and alarms for Dec, 1876, H 9 : Jan., a 64; Feb., 
cl42; March, a 225; April, c 311: Muv.c 407 ; .lune,490; 
July, 580 ; Aug. 696; Sept. 641 ; Oct. <■ 720 ; Nov. 782 
Petition for new fire alarm box in Ward 24, referred to the 

Commissioners, c 36, a 41 
Uniforms for Fire Commissioners, order rejected, c 30 ; recon- 
sidered, referred, c 48, a 54 
Vacations for firemen, referred, c 63, a 64 ; resolve passed, c 386 
Report on rebuilding Jenney & Co.'s petroleum works, a. 135 
Expediency of giving fines to Firemen's Charitable Fund, 

referred, c 194, a 197 ; report, a 509, c 513 
Exhibition by Fire Extinguishing Liquid Co., c 207, a 210 
Pay of crew of fire-boat, c 236, a 238, c 386, a 389, c 778, 794 
Certificate of seven years' service, ordinance passed, a 240 ; 

referred, c 253, a 258 ; ordinance passed, c 328, a 337 
Expediency of changing Board of Fire Commissioners referred, 

a 267, c 270 
Bxplo.^ive compounds, order to report ordinances, c 858, 383, a 

889 ; repoit, ordinance and order passed, a 843, c 846 
Management of fire-boat, referred, c 387, a 339 
Vacation for firemen and fii-e-alarm employe.-*, c 3S5, a 391, 491 

c 494, a 506, c 513, a 535, c 540, a 551 
Order to investigate cause of fire corner Shawmut avenue and 

Pleasant street, c 407 ; indefinitely postponed, c 482 
Board of Commissioners allowed to fix salary of clerks, a 412 
Exhibition of Boston Self-Regulating Fire Escape and Hose, 

a 412 
Annual report, 460 
Ordinance to amend, referred, c 408, a 412 ; report, 814 ; referred 

to next city government, c 833, a 840 
Arrangement of Telegraph Wires, order passed, c 623, a 627 ; 

report, c 814, a 820 
Investigation of Fire Commissioners, order passed, c 677, a 681, 

c 690 ; report, a 725, c 734 
$300 to Charles Brooks, c 779, 789, a 795 
Fitzgerald, Alderman — remarks : 
On election of chairman, 2 
Retrenchment in expenditures, 10, 42, 102, 197 
Cost of publishing orders of notice, 20 
Repairs of police stations, 46 
0nion Freight Railroad, 46 
Abatement of a claim against a bankrupt, 52 



VI I r 



INDEX TO PEOOEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Equitable valuation of property, 64, 305 

Election ot Assessors, 56, 179 

Exhibition on Common, 57, 111, 131 

N. W. Day's omnibus route, 80 

Management of sinking funds, 80, 109, 130, 146, 157, 176 

Charles-river embankment, 117 

Tracks on Columbus ave., 151, 173 

Protection of burial-grounds, 157 

System of taxation, 175 

Confirming nominations of city officers, 197 

Care of truants, 199, 210 

Ninth-street improvement, and work for laborers, 206 

Play-ground on Common, 211 

Fruit-stands in streets, 239, 263 

Fourth of July, 240 

Appropriation Bill, 242, 261 

Boats on Public-Garden pond, 248 

South Boston R.R., 249 

East Boston Ferries, 260, 657 

Middlesex R.R., 266 

New piggery at Deer Island, a 266 

Charles-river park, 267 

A''acation Schools, 280, 361, 389 

Sealers of Weights and Measures, 297, 426, 436, 4^7, 510 

Vacant stores and tenements, 306 

Registrar of Voters, 316, 351 

Petition for new Gas Co., 317, 800 

Refreshment bills , 319 

Army and Navy Monument, 322, 592 

English High and Latin Schools, 322 

Salary of Inspector at Abattoir, 335 

Public Parks, 344, 369, 414, 438, 475, 533 

License Commissioners 350, 618, 641 

Wales-street drainage, 379 

Work on Mystic Valley Sewer, 392, 425, 458, 472 

Asphalt pavement, 320, 397, 453 

Poland & Peabody's Omnibus Line, 398 

Public School Musical Exhibitions, 401 

AUston School, 433 

Salary of Superintendent Public Library, 470 

Free Ferries, 487 

Police Sergeant Clark, 492 

Commercial-street widening, 607, 631, 839 

Free access to horse-railroad cars , 511 

Salary of City Engineer, 533 

Proposed visit of Governors, 537 

Horse-car blockades, 538, 591, 618, 645 

Limit of City Indebtedness, 588 

Inspection of Lime, 598, 601 

Constables, 593, 609, 618, 624, 629 

Blackstone-square accident, 609, 646, 662 

Rejection of policeman, 613 

Paving Richmond street, 615 

East Boston High School, 627, 647 

Printing Army and Navy Memorial, 616, 632 

Removal of horses from South Russell street, 647 

Discharge of Laborers in Paving Department, 667 

Wines, etc., at city entertainments, 658 

Ward-room in Ward 24, 659, 700 

Public Park Loan, 660 

Refreshments and bills, 683 

South Boston Railroad location, 698 

Police Rules and Regulations, 704, 840 

Vegetable Market, 715 

Brimmer School, 744 

Metropolitan Railroad, 747 

Roxbury Canal, 760, 764, 785 

Small-pox Hospital, 781 

Condition of School-houses, 782 

Industrial School, 782, 797 

Metropolitan Railroad Location in Washington-st., 822 

Management of horse railroads, 845 

Congress-st. widening, 854 

Closing Proceedings, 856, 861 
Flint, Ward 8 — For Flint, read Flynn, Ward 13 
Flynn, Ward 13 — remarks : 

Declining renomination on Committee on Accounts, 4 

Admission to ante-room, 6 

Retrenchment in expenditures, 13, 141, 161, 189 

Charges against Globe Theatre, 22 

Badges, 24 

Special Committee on Parks, 26 

Pay of street laborers, 59, 194, [206, see Flint] 

Estates sold for assessments, 60 

Work for poor citizens, 61 

Boards and commissions, 76 

Common Council refreshment bills, 98 

Sinking Funds, 119, 182 

Mechanics' Fair and the Common, 125, 138 
' Contingent Fund, 142 

Appropriation Bill, 2-54 

Fourth of July, 255 

Mr. Keith's appointment to Board of Health, 255, 271, 293, 310 

Fourth of July, 273 

License Commissioners, 287, 315, 328, 354, 384, 652, 676 

Board of Health, 295 

Mystic Valley Sewer, 309 

Horatio Harris estate for park, 315, 325 



Contracts only to citizens, 355 

Civilities to distinguished strangers, 358, 459 

Salary of Superintendent of Dover-street bridge, 3S1 

Ninth street, 386, 479 

Army and Navy Monument, 431 , 440 

Public Parks, 478, 481. 502, 524 

Registrar of Voters, 467 

Commercial street, 497, 752, 773, 792, 829 

Free Ferries, 523 

Improved Sewerage, 530, 564 

Refreshments, etc., 531, 773, 835 

Messenger for Treasury Department, 620 

Extra pay for September 17, 621 

Police Boat " Protector ", 622 

Wines, etc., at city entertainments, 653 

Removal of Superintendent Common, 655 

Investigation of Department of Common, etc., 656 

Inspection of refreshment bills, 676 

Investigation of Fire Commissioner, 677 

Care of Public Grounds, 692, 794 

Election of Inspector of Buildings, 701, 720, 738 

Stony Brook, 718, 748 

Vegetable Market, 719 

Stone-cutting business at the Islands, 748 

Roxbury Canal, 789, 848 

Curbstone Fruit-venders, 829 
Forest Hills Cemetery — 

Occupation of lands authorized, a 241 
Fourth of July — 

Order for committee, laid on table, c 143 ; referred to Re- 
trenchment Committee, c 222 ; indefinitely postponed, a 
240 ; new order passed, a 240 ; substitute assigned, c 254 -^ 
passed, committee appointed, c 273, a 277 

Sale of fireworks, petition referred, a 450, ; report, a 474 

Thanks to orator, c 480, a 490 

Sailing regatta, petition referred, a 505 
Eraser, Ward 6 — remarks : 

Contract for water-pipes, 72 

Appropriation Bill, 235 

Mystic Valley Sewer, 309, 404, 427, 460 

Visit to Sudbury river, 430, 440 

Repair's on Adams School-house, 466 

Salaries of employes of Water Board, 467 

Widening Commercial street, 482, 513 

School Sessions, 638 

Opportunity for city employes to vote, 692 

Historic sites, 790 

Commercial-st. widening, 793, 804 

Extra Services in the Assessors' Department, 803 

Stony Brook, 805 
Funds — see also Sinking Funds — 

Franklin Fund — examination of accounts, a 33 ; report, a 4? 

Loan to A. G. Rockwood, a 41, 56 

Loan to George H. Dyer, a 278 

Dorchester Trust Funds, annual report, a 412 

G. A.R.— 

$200 to each post for Decoration Day, c 217, a 223 

Invitation for Decoration Day accepted, offer of escort referred, 
a 267, c 270, a 320, c 324, a 363 
Gas — 

Proposition from Globe Gaslight Co., referred, a 70 

Petition for new Gas Co., referred, a 317; report, a 767, 800 
Gibson, Alderman — remarks : 

Abatement of claim against a bankrupt, a 52 

Equitable valuation of property, 54, 306 

Election of Assessors, 56 

Appointment of special police at Boston and Maine R. R., 72 

Salaries, 104 

Exhibition on Common, 112 

Ninth-street improvement, and work for laborers, 205 

Fruit-stands in streets, 240 

Appropriation Bill, 247 

East Boston Ferries, 258 

Vacation Schools, 281 

Salary of Inspector of Provisions, 285 

Sealers of Weights and Measures, 298, 457, 511 

Army and Navy Monument, 322 

Public Parks, 350, 378, 422, 476, 821 

Play-grounds, 350 

License Commissioners, 350 

Registrar of Voters, 351 

Wales-street drainage, 379 

Personal explanation, 389 

Asphalt pavement, 396, 455 

Poland and Peabody's Omnibus Line, 401 

Salary of Superintendent Public Library, 471 

Free Ferries, 489 

Police Sergeant Clark, 492 

Mystic Valley Sewer, 472 

Vacation for firemen, 507, 552 

Commercial-street widening, 631 

Blackstone-square accident, 610, 664 

Rejection of policeman, 614 

East Boston High School, 627, 647 

License Commissioners, 643 

Refreshments, etc., 687 

Metropolitan railroad, 729 



INDEX TO PEOCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



IX 



Highland railway, 732 
Koxbury Canal, 787 
Claim oif John Raddin, 825 



Ham, Ward 14 — remarks : 
Visit to the parks, 315 
Horatio Harris estate for park, 326 
i'lay-arounds, 327 
Mystic Valley Sewer, 330 
Stony-brook Improvement, 381 

Salary of Supetintendeut of Dover-street bridge, 382 
Ninth street, SSfi 
Public Parks, 501 
ImproTed Sewerage, 567 
Appointment of Inspector of Buildings, 720 
Historical sites, 7S9 

Uate of fare for Old South Ball, a 214 
Harbor — 

Investing Harbor Master with police powers and duties, a 69, 80 
Dredging on Charles river, referred, c 315, a 318 ; report, a 660, 

c66y 
Expediency of furnishing steam facilities to Harbor Master, 
referred, c 834, a 840 
Health — 

Nuisance in Charlestown, committee to give hearing, c 480, a 490 
Nuisance at the Highlands, petition referred, a 505 
Health, Board of — 

Order of inquiry relating to scarlet fever, c 5, a 8 ; report from 

Board of Health, referred, c 14, a 17 
Nuisance near junction Commonwealth avenue and Parker 

streer, referred, a 171, c 181 
Cemeteries, conveyance of lots, report, c 208 ; ordinance passed, 

c 217, a 223 
Stony Brook nuisance, requested to examine cellars, c 221, a 

223; report, c 255, a 258 
Inspection of oysters, c 255, a 258 
Expediency of reconstituting, rejected, c 275, 294 
Lying-in-hospitals, permits refused, a 320, 611 
Hospitals authorized, a 660 
Order requiring members to devote whole time to duties, a 323, 

c324 
Orders relating to information from City Registrar referred, a 363 
Urinals, request referred, a 508 
Annual report, c 543, a 555 
Expediency of employing physicians to visit poor referred, a 588, 

c 603 ; report, c 833 ; a 840 
Expediency of transferring care of ashes to Fire Dspartment, 

referred, c 638, a 640 ; report, c 814, a 820 
Report on Prison Point Flats, resolve passed, c 635, a 640 ; a 

788, c 789 ; report of Board, a 796 
Small-pox Hospital, request for additional appropriation, a 725, 
c 734 ; order passed, a 746 ; referred to special investig.ating 
committee, c 748, 775, a 781; report, orders passed, c 834, 
a 840 
He.alth Department — 

Superintendent authorized to purchase horses, supplies, etc., 

c 26, 35, a 41 
Cost of removing night-soil, referred, c 51, a 54 ; report, a 71, c 

72 
Contract for house offal in WestRoxbury authorized, a 278, c 310 
Contract for offal in E.ist Boston authorized, c 816, a 820 
Hibbard, "Ward 17 — remarks : 
Election of Ferry Directors, 15 
Salaries, 169, 192 
Appropriation Bill, 235 
Second Assistant Assessors, 270 
Ventilation of Council Chamber, 313 
Mystic Valley Sewer, 329 
Contracts only to citizens, 356 
Visit to Sudbury river, 430 
Army and Navy Monument, 445 
Refreshments, etc., 632 
Sealers of Weights and Measures, 546 
Inspection of Ijime, 605 
Highland R. R. Co.— 

Tracks on Columbus ave., hearing, a 52, 65; reports, a 134 ; 
substitute order referred, a 149 ; order passed, a 172 ; 
location accepted, a 197 
Authorized to increase number of cars, a 363 
Temporary track on Cliandler street, a 412 
Hearing on tracks in (Dartmouth and Bo3'lston streets, a 483; 

leave to wthJraw, a 511 
Hearing on running to northern depots, a 551, 594; leave to 

withdraw, a 615 ; indefinitely postponed, 856 
Petition for tracks in Eliot street, a 644 ; hearing, 696 ; report, 

708 ; order passed, 732 
Location accepted, 760 
Location on Northampton street, 854 
Iliscock, Ward 21 — remarks : 

Salaries and duties of city officers, 38, 193 
Historic Sites — 

Offer of escort referred, a 174 

Tablet on Christ Church, a 762, 763; recommittal, c 789, a 795 : 
orders passed, c 834, a 840, c 849, a 853 
Howes, Ward 18— remarks : 
Personal explanation, c 21 



B.adges, 24 

Special Committee on Parks, 26 

Salaries and duties of city officers, 39, 40, 141, 164, 183, 828 

Uniform for Fire Commissioners, 49 

Pay of street laborers, 59 

Labor for poor citizens, 61 

Boards and commissions, 75 

Additional appropriation for Public Grounds, c 97 

Mechanics' Fair and the Common, 125, 138 

Management of Public Grounds, 139 

Appropriation for Public Grounds, 139 

Contingent Fund, 142 

Pensions for Police, 145, 158 

Pay of laborers, 206 

Play-ground on Common, 209, 314 

System of valuation , 207 

Appropriation Bill, 229 

Second Assistant Assessors, 254 

Mr. Keith's appointment to the Board ot Health, 256, 272, 294 

Fourth of July, 273 

Acceptance of Mercantile Library, 274 

License Commissioners, 288, 653 

Joint Rules and Orders, 289 

Duties of Board of Health, 324 

Play-grounds, 327 

Contracts only to tax-payers, 332, 355 

Official report, 359 

Releases on Winship place, 382 

Fence on Commonwealth avenue, 386 

Management of fire- boat, 387 

Drainage of Muddy brook, 387 

Fire corner Shawmut ave. and Pleasant street, 408 

Mystic Valley Sewer, 429 

Visit to Sudbury river, 430 

Army and Navy Monument, 444 

Inspection of Buildings, 447 

Public Parks, 498, 528 

Sealers of Weights and Measures, 513 

Free Ferries, 520 

Refreshments and carriage-hire, 531 

Proposed visit of Governors, 540 

Vacations for firemen, 542 

Occupancy of streets for building, 547 

Improved Sewerage, 564 

Additional Appropriation for Common, 634, 654, 691 

Police Boat ' ' Protector ", 636 

Care of hot ashes, 638 

Wines, etc., at city entertainments, 653 

Removal of Superintendent Common, 655 

Investigation of Department of Common, etc., 656, 669, 805 

Laborers on Public Grounds, 656 

Investigation of Fire Commissioners, 678, 734 

Inspection of refreshment bills, 676 

Care of Public Grounds, 693 

Appointment of Inspector of Buildings, 701, 720, 737 

Records of the Ferries, 742 

Commercial-street widening, 755, 830 

Employes on Fire Boat, 778 

Historic sites, 791 

Claim of John Raddin, 827 

Roxbury Canal, 832 

Improved Sewerage — 

Joint Special Committee to resume charge, a 20, c 6, a 47, c 285 

Reference of Mayor's Address, c 26 

Report, and referred, c 497, a 506 

Report, 530 ; specially assigned, c 544 ; orders passed, c 559, 

a 569 
City Engineer authorized to employ assistance, and incur ex- 
penses, a 617, c 621 
Committee authorized to accept collateral, a 646, c 651 
City Engineer's visit to Eui-ope, c 635, a 640 
Shelter for steam-pump on Berkeley street, a 799, c 803 
Property at Old Harbor Point, order passed, c 849, a 853 
Boston Society of Architects, communication referred, c 833, 
a 840 
Industrial Schools — 

Petition referred, a 484, c 494 ; report referred, a 767, c 770 ; re- 
port, a 782 ; order rejected, a 797 
Inspector of Buildings — see Buildings. 
Inspector of Lime — 

Petition from Dealers in Lime, referred, a 598 ; report, orders 
passed, a 601; substitute passed, c 603; non-concurrence, 
a 611 ; laid on table, c 621 ; indefinitely postponed, c 835 
Invitations accepted— see also G. A. R. 

Faneuil Hall Temperance Reform Club, a 88 
Carney Hospital Fair, a 612, c 620 

Jack.son, Ward 16 —remarks : 
Regulation of quacks. .39 
Work for poor citizens, 63 
Salaries of city officers, 141, 163, 190 
Salary of Superintendent of Dover-street bridge, 403 
Mystic Valley Sewer, 406 
Civilities to distinguished str.angers, 459 
Sealers of Weights and Measures, 01.3 
Wines, etc., at city entertainments, 639 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Jury List — 

Revised list and communication from Registrars of Voters, 

a 157 
List adopted, a 176 

Kelley , "Ward 3 — remarlss : 
Salaries, 160, 192 
Joint Rules and Orders, 291 
Mr. Keith's appointment to Boai'd of Health, 294 
Mystic Talley Sewer, 309, 329, 405 
A'entilation of Council Chamber, 313 
Visit to Sudbury river, 357. 409 
Inspection of Buildings, 446 
Repairs on Adams School-house, 466 
Refreshments, etc., 532 
"Vacations for firemen, 541 
Occupancy of streets for building, 548 
Inspection of Lime, 605 

Investigation of Department of Common, etc., 656 
Armory in Charlestown, 719 
Appointment of Inspector of Buildings, 722 
Commercial-st. widening, 793 
Surveyors of Highways, 816 
License Commissioners, 836 ^ , 

Lamp Department — 

Annual report of Superintendent, a 9 

Supt. authorized to purchase supplies, etc., and employ men, 

a 33 
Expediency of removing lamp-posts at Granary Burial-ground, 

referred, a 323 
Committee authorized to visit other cities, a 660 
Nomination of Superintendent rejected, a 856 
Law Department — 

Annual report of City Solicitor, a 55 
Opinion requested on limit of city indebtedness, a 588 
Semi-annual report of City Solicitor, a 841 
Legislative matters — 

Expediency of regulation of quacks referred, o 39, a 41 ; report, 

order passed, c 58, a 64 
Order relating to boards and commissions, c 63, 74, a 88 
Changing Aldermanic to Joint Committees, c 98, a 100 
Protection of burial-grounds, order of inquiry passed, a 157 ; 

indefinitely postponed, c 158 
Order passed to oppose changing system of taxation, a 175 ; 

rejected, c 183 ; reconsideration refused, c 206 
Old South, c 194, 236 
Charles-river Park, a 267, c 271, a 277 

Surveyors of Highways, order referred, c 810; indefinitely post- 
poned, a 820 
Management of horse railroads, a 845 
License Commissioners — 
Annual report, a 64 
Nominations requested, c 276, a 277 
Appointed, a 277, c 286, 310 
Apartments indefinitely postponed, c 315 

Kequest for police referrsd, a 317 ; orders passed, a350, c354, 383 
Organization , a 320 

Additional clerk, c 328, a 350, c 352, a 368 
Disposition cf License fees, c 357, 385 
Salaries — see Salaries . 
Licenses — 

I'ruit pedlars, petition, a 196 ; hearing on remonstrance, a 238 ; 

discussion, order indefinitely postponed, a 261 1 new order 

referred, a 265 
Report on Jourdain's Museum of Anatomy, a 795 
Venders of old lead pipe, order referred, c 816, a 820 
Pruit, Mayor requested to petition, a 824, c 829, 846 
Lime — see Inspection of Lime. 
Loans — 

851,500,000 in anticipation of taxes, c 466, a 472 
$460,000 for Back Bay Park — see Public Parks. 
$3,713,000 for Improved Sewerage, c 659 
!S1,000,000 for widening Commercial street, a 629 
$138,000 for Stony Brook improvement, a 732 

Markets — 

Quarterly report of Superintendent, a 55, 214 

I'aneuil Hall, new leases authorized, a 175 ; new order referred, 

a 202 ; report, order passed, a 214 
Superintendent authorized to employ deputy, a 223 
Vegetable Market, report on purchase, a 581 ; laid on table, 

a 583 ; assigned, a 700 ; referred, a 709 ; laid on table, c 719 ; 

referred to next City (iovernnient, c 833 
Report on dressed poultry, referred, a 647 ; ordinance passed, 

c 651, a 658 
Mass. Charitable Mechanic Association — see Common. 
Mayor — 

Copy of Inaugural Address requested, c 4, a 8 

Disposition of topics in address, I'eferred, c 4, a 8 ; report, and 

reference of topics, c 25, a 29 
Appointment of railroad police at Bo.ston & Maine R. R., c 72 
Autliorized to extend civilities to distinguished strangers, c 357, 

a 363, c 459 
Proposed visit of Governors of States, a 505, 536 ; c 540, 550 
Legal proceedings against free Ferries, a 657 
Purchase by Park Commissioners, c 817 
Valedictory, 857 



McDonald, "Ward 12 — remarks : 

Election of Ferry Directors, 15 

Pay of street laborers, 59, 74 

Buildings to tie inspected, 431 

Storage of gunpowder, 467 

Appointment of Inspector of Buildings, 720 
McGaragle, "Ward 8 — remarks: 

Badges, 15, 23 

Special Committee on Parks, 26 

Salaries and duties of city officers, 87, 160, 186 

Regulation of quacks, 39 

Uniform for Fire Commissioners, 48 

Pay of street laborers, 59 

Estates sold for assessments, 60 

"Work for poor citizens, 61 

Abolition of Assistant Assessors, 98 

Sinking Funds, 119, 182 

Mechanics' Fair and the Common, 125 

Pensions for Police, 145, 158 

Play-ground on Common, 209, 314 

Appropriation Bill, 232, 254 

Mr. Keith's appointment to Board of Health, 256, 272, 294 

New Building at Deer Island, 270 

Acceptance of Mercantile Library, 274 

License Commis;=ioners, 288, 352, 384, 652 

Joint Rules and Orders, 290 

Duties of Board of Health, 324 

Horatio Harris Estate for Park, 326 

Mystic Valley Sewer, 330, 405 

Police for License Commissioners, 354 

Contracts only to tax-payers, 355 

Cusbiug's Manual for members, 356 

Fire corner Shawmut ave. and Pleasant st., 408 

Visit to Sudbury river, 409 

Laborers in Paving Dept., 410 

Buildings to be inspected, 431, 446 

Repairs on Adams School-house, 467 

Commercial street, 497 

Occupancy of streets for building, 513, 546 

Public Parks, 524, 813 

Tax titles, 531 

Refreshments, etc., 531, 774 

Vn cation for Firemen, 541 

Salary of clerk of Ferries, 550 

Improved Sewerage, 561, 635 

Sealers of Weights and Measures, 567 

Inspection of Lime, 607 

Police Boat " Protector", 622 

Wines, etc., at city entertainments, 639, 658, 673 

Duties of city officers, 656 

Investigation of Fire Commissioners, 678 

Opportunity for city employes to vote, 692 

Care of Public Grounds, 693 

Appointment of Inspector of Buildings, 722 

Stone-cutting business at the Islands, 748 

Small Pox Hospital, 776 

Employes on Fire Boat, 778 

Payment for extra services in Assessors' Department, 803 

Reduction of rent to T. W. Carter, 803 

Claim of .lohn Raddin, 827 

Curbstone fruit-venders, 829 
Metropolitan R. R. Co. — 

Part of location granted June 29, 1874, revoked, a 19 

Hearing on tracks in Columbus ave. and Northampton St., a 52 ; 
report, a 135 ; substitute order referred, a 149 ; report, 
order passed, a 172, a 321 

Hearing on tracks in Lexington, Prescott and Liverpool streets, 
a 88 

Location in Leoox Street, hearing, a 146 

Location in Atlantic avenue and across Dover street, hearing, 
a 171 

Location in Lexington street, a 265 

Forty -sixth location accepted, a 278 

Forty-seventh location accepted, a 337 

Leave to lay tracks on Atlantic ave., a 338 

Forty -eighth location accepted, a 363 

Hearing on tracks in Dartmouth and Marlborough streets, 
a 468 ; leave to withdraw, a 511 

Additional track on Marlborough street authorized, a 511 

49th location accepted, a 583 

Petition for track in iv'ashington and Milk streets, a 643 ; hear- 
ing, 695, reports, 707 ; order passed, a 728 

Location in Battery street, hearing, 759 ; order passed, 783 

Locations accepted, 760, 820 

Hearing on change in Wa.sliington St., 819 ; order passed, 821 ; 
location accepted, 821, 839 

Hearing on location over the Milldam , 837 ; order referred to 
next I oard, 856 
Middlesex R. R. Co. — 

Location in Haymarket square granted, a 89 

Hearing on location in Lincoln St., a 101 

Hearing on connecting with S. B. 11. R. track, a 170; order 
passed, a 266 

Locations accepted, a 172, 320, 449 

Location in Il.aymarket Square, hearing, a 411 ; leave to with- 
draw. 511 

Location at Old Colony Depot, hearing, a 411 ; order passed, 728 
Location in Bevei-ley street, hearing, a 412 ; granted, a 436 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



XI 



Fifteenth location accepted, a 449 

Turnout track on Alford street, a. 511 

Sixteenth location accepted, a 556 

Communication accepting seventeenth location laid on table, 
745 ; location revoked, 843 

Hearing on location in South and Kneeland streets, a 819; leave 
to withdraw, 843 

Authorized to run additional cars, 856 
Militia — 

$200 for fitting up armory Co. A, 1st Bat. Inf., a 20 

$2.50 for repairing and fitting up armory of Co. D, Eou:?th Eat. 
Inf., a 33 

$500 for furnishing and fitting up armory of Co. C, Fourth Bat. 
Inf., a 71 

Kent of Ninth Reg. Inf. transferred to Ninth Bat. Inf., and ap- 
proval of head-guarters, a 71 

$200 for furnishing and repairing head-quarters of First Bat. 
Cav., a 71 

Mayor requested to petition for further allowance for rent of 
armories, a 94, c 95 

Second Brigade M.V.M., $250, furnishing and fitting up head- 
quarters, a 176 

Fifth Regiment Infantry, $200, fitting up head-quarters, a 176 
" $200, " " '• a 176 

First Brigade M.T.M., $450 for rent of head-quarters, a 176 
" " " $250 for fitting up head-quarters, 176 

Co. 0, Ninth Bat. of Inf., $700 for rent, a 215 
<' " " " $350 for fitting up armory, a 215 

Co. A, " " " $150, furnishing armory, a 227 

$600 for rent of Institute of Technology, a 241 

$250 for Armory of Fourth Bat. Inf., a 338 

Co. D., Fifth Reg. Inf., armory established, a 450 

®400 for Armory Co. D, First Bat. Cav., a 659 

$1000 for Armory Co. D, Fifth Reg., a 699 

Co. I), Fifth Reg., order to fit up old Winthrop School building 
for armory referred, c 719, 743 

TJnattached Company Inf., $600 for rent, 784 

Co. D., Fifth Reg. Inf., $500 and $300 for rent, 855 
Milk — 

Annual report of Inspector, a 225 
Minors — 

Board of Aldermen authorized to make rules or grant licenses, 
a 12, o 13 

Rules adopted, a 18 
Morrill, Ward 21 — remarks : 

Payment for extra services in Assessors' Department, 803 

Commercial-st. widening, 804 

Public Parks, 817 
Mowry, Ward 11 — remarks : 

Badges, 23 

Petition of James DeshoUj 48 

Uniform system of valuation, 48 

Abolition of Assistant Assessors, 73 

Sinking Funds, 120 

Exhibition on Common, 138 

Salaries, 165 

System of valuation, 207 

Appropriation Bill, 234 

Mr. Keith's appointment to Board of Health, 256 

Acceptance of Mercantile Library, 274 

Joint Rules and Orders, 290 

Personal explanation , 308 

"Ventilation of Council Chamber, 312 

Clerk for License Commissioners, 352 

Salary of Supt. Dover-st. Bridge, 382, 404 

Releases on Winship Place, 382 

Salary of Clerks in Fire Commissioners' office, 409 

Mystic Valley Sewer, 429 

Vacation for firemen , 495, 541 

Free Ferries, 496, 516 

Sale of Atherton school-building, 513 

Occupancy of streets for building, 613, 648 

Improved Sewerage, 561 

Sealers of Weights and Measures, 567 

Additional appropriation for Common, 684, 672 

License Commissioners, 651, 676 

Investigation of Fire Commissioners, 677 

Hiring rooms in I'embei'ton square, 669 

Opportunity for city employes to vote, 692 

Inspection of bills in Auditor's office, 693 

Election of Inspector of Buildings, 701, 721, 742 

Stone-cutting business at the Islands, 748 

Commercial-st. Widening, 752, 793 

Small-pox Hospital, 777 

Historical Sites. 789 

Stony Brook, 794 

Payment for extra services in Assessors' Department, 804 

Public Parks, 817 

Surveyors of Highways, 816 

Claim of John Kaddin, 827 

Roxbury Canal, 832, 849 

Northampton-street District — see Unfinished Business. 

O'Brien, Alderman — remarks : 
On election of chairman , 1 
Retrenchment in expenditures, 10, 41, 105 
Loiterers in City Hall, 46, 64 



Union Freight Railroad, 46 

Equitable valuation of property, 55, 305 

Exhibition on Common, 57, 111 

Appointment of special police at Boston & Maine R. R., 72 

Managemeut of sinking funds, 84 

Consolidation of City Registrar and Board of Health, 87 

Charles-river embankment, 117 

Tracks on Columbus ave., 151, 173 

Protection of burial-grounds, 157 

List of Jurors, 157, 176 

Investigation of Assistants in Paving Department, 175 

System of taxation, 175 

Election of Assessors^ 179 

Confirming nominations of City Officers, 197 

Ninth-street improvement and work for laborers, 204, 449 

Play ground on Common, 212 

Fourthof July, 240 

Appropriation Bill, 245 

South Boston R.R., 249 

East Boston Ferries, 259, 667 

Fruit-stands in streets, 261 

Charles-river Park, 268 

Vacation Schools, 282, 362 

Salary of Inspector of Provisions, 285, 335 

Sealers of Weights and Measures, 300, 511, 579, 584 

Vacant stores and tenements, 307 

Registrar of Voters, 316, 351 

Petition for New Gas Co., 318 

Army and Navy Monument, 322 

Public Parks, 339, 369, 415, 439, 475, 534, 821 

Northampton-street District, 361, 596 

Wales-street drainage, 379 

Poland & Peabody's Omnibus Line, 401 

Mystic Valley Sewer, 424, 435, 467, 472 

Asphalt pavement. 320, 456 

Salary of Supt. of Public Library, 469 

Free Ferries, 484 

Vacation of Firemen, 506^ 552 

Commercial-street widening, 507, 657, 629 

Free access to horse railroad cars, 511 

Salary of City Engineer, 533 

Proposed visit of Governors, 537 

Horse-car blockades, 538, 591, 618 

Occupation of streets for building, 554 

Improved Sewerage, 671 

Printing at Deer Island, 586 

Employing of physicians to visit poor, 588 

Limit of city indebtedness, 589 

Inspection of Lime, 598, 601, 611 

Blackstone-square accident, 610 

Constables, 612, 624 

Rejection of policeman, 613 

License Commissioners, 618 

East Boston High School, 628, 648 

Police boat " Protector", 629 

Printing Army and Navy Memorial , 632 

Public park loan, 660 

Refreshments, etc., 683 

Expenditures for Common and Public Grounds, 689 

Police rules and regulations, 706 

Vegetable Market, 716 

Metropolitan Railroad, 729 

Stony Brook Improvement, 733 

Highland-Street Railway, 732 

Roxbury Canal, 760, 763, 787 

Forfeiture of land on Washington sq., 761, 769 

Small-pox Hospital, 781 

Claim of John Raddin, 825 

Management of horse-railroads, 845 

Congress-st. widening, 854 
O'Donnell, Ward 7 — remarks : 

Pay of laborers, 194, 20b 

Visit to Sudbury river, 409 

Opportunity for city employes to vote, 692 

Appointment of Inspector of Buildings, 720 
Omnibuses, etc. — 

Poland and Peabody's omnibus line from South Boston to 
northern depots, hearing and recommittal, a 43, 278 ; leave 
to withdraw, a 398 

From Cragie's bridge to India wharf, allowed, a 56 

From Boston & Maine R. R. to Rowe's and India wharves, al- 
lowed, a 56 

FromBowdoin sq. to Rowe'sandlndia wharves, allowed, a56, 636 

N. W. Day's omnibus route, a 80, 196, 224, 278 

Fletcher's passenger wagon, Fitchburg R. R. to Rowe's wharf, 
a 214 

Ryan & Son's passenger wagon, Bowdoin sq. to Rowe's wharf, 
a 241 

Roswell E. Bailey, passenger wagon from Maverick sq. to Cliel- 
sea, a 267 

Samuel J. Ellis, passenger wagon from Maverick sq. to Mai- 
den, a 278 

Wm. Burnett, passenger wagon from Winthrop to South Ferry, 
a 535, 612 

Wm. Fletcher, passenger wagon from Charlestown to Taber- 
nacle, a 682 
Overseers of Poor — 

Quarterly reports, a 55, 296, 680, 704 



xir 



I^n)EX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Report of examination of property, c 160, a 171 

Report on resolve requesting reduction in salaries, c 222 ; order 

passed, a 238 
Annual Report, a 450 



Passenger Wagons — see Omnibuses, etc. 
Paving Department — 

Investigation of assistants, a 174 
Pawnbrokerage — 

Request of Supt. for investigation, committee appointed, a 505 ; 

report, 580 
Annual report of Supt., a 824 
Pearl, Ward 1 — Remarks : 
Appropriation Bill, 234 
Management of the Ferries, 255 
Salary of clerk of Ferries, 550 
Release of land to heirs of John English, 702 
Perham, Ward 23 — remarks : 

Stony Brook Improvement, 381 
Public Parks, 524 
Play -grounds on new Parks, 531 
Stony Brook, 805 
Pieioe, Ward 24 — remarks : 

Documents for Social Law Library, 35 
Boards and commissions, 76 
Sinking Funds, 122 

Mechanics' Fair and the Common, 125 
Appropriation Bill, 254 
Second Assistant Assessors, 270 
Visit to the parks, 315 
Horatio Harris estate for park, 315, 325 
Cushing's manual for members, 356 
Contracts only to citizens, 356 
Civilities to distinguished strangers, 358 
Official report, 359 
Buildings to be inspected, 431 
Army and Navy Monument, 441 
Public Parks, 628 
Improved Sewerage, 565 
Messenger for Treasury Department, 620 
Additional appropriation for Common, 654 
Care of Public Grounds, 678, 692 
Curbstone fruit-venders, 829 
Commercial-st. widening, 830 
Police — 

Quarterly reports of Chief, a 9, 536, 641 
Annual report of Chief, a 17 

Order relating to loiterers in City Hall, a 45 ; indefinitely post- 
poned, a 54 
Keeping Iiorses, purchasing furniture and supplies, making re- 
pairs, authorized, a 54 
Police Relief Association, by-laws referred, a 70 ; approved, a 101 
Police sergeants, maximum number, a 70 
Annual report of Police Charitable Fund, a 320 
Police for bath-houses, a 380 
Police Sergeant Clark, reconsideration lost, a 492 

Police boat " Protector ", investigation, c 622 ; resolve rejected, 
c636 

Police rules and regulations, a 699, 704, 795, 840 

Vagrants, Committee to confer with Overseers of Poor, a 700 
Pope, Benjamin, Ward 15 — 

Elected President, 3 ; address, 3 

Response to Resolution of Thanks, 850 
Pope, Ward 14 — remarks : 

Salaries and duties of city officers, 38, 193 

Jlechanics' Fair and the Common, 126, 138 

Civilities to distinguished strangei's, 357, 459 

Fire corner Shawmut avenue and Pleasant street, 407 

Laborers in Paving Department, 410 

Duties of Retrenchment Committee, 410 

Vacation for firemen, 495 

Police boat " Protector," 622 

Additional appropriation for Common, etc., 654 

Investigation of Department of Common, etc., 656 

Laborers on public grounds, 656 

Refreshments, etc., 673 

Payment for extra services iu Assessors' DeiJartment, 803 

Common Investigation, 813 
Pratt, Ward 21 — remark.-i : 

Treatment of scarlet fever, 5 

Retreachment iu expenditures, 13 

Badges, 23 

Documents for Social Law Library, 35 

Salaries and duties of city officers, 37, 160, 187 

Regulation of quacks, 39 

Work for poor citizens, 61 

Abolition of Assistant Assessors, 99 

Sinking Funds, 118, 182 

I'ersonal explanation, 123 

Mechanics' Fair and the Common, 127 

Flay -ground on Common, 209 

Appropriation Bill, 232 

Dorchester school-house windows, 255 

Joint Rules and Orders, 291 

Acceptance of Mercantile Library , 292 

Mr. Kei'-h's appointment to Board of Health, 293 

Horatio Hirris estate for park, 325 



Mystic Valley Sewer, 329, 406, 429 
Contracts only to tax-payers, 332 
Salary of c'erks in Fire Commissioners office, 409 
Visit to Sudbury river, 409 
Duties of Retrenchment Committee, 410 
Personal explanations, 430 
Army and Navy Monument, 442 
Public Parks, 482, 502, 527 
Free Ferries, 514 
Improved Sewerage, 530 
Refreshments, etc., 532, 773 
Proposed visit of Governors, 540 
Vacations for firemen, 542 
Sealers of Weights and Measures, 567 
Inspection of Lime, 604 
School Sessions, 037 

Wines, etc., at city entertainments, 639, 653, 674, 673 
Additional Appropriation for Common, 654, 672, 691 
Laborers on public grounds, 656 
License Commissioners, 676 
Investigation of Fire Commissioners, 677 
Opportunity for city employes to vote, 692 
Inspection of bills in Auditor's office, 693 
Stony Brook, 718, 793 

Appointment of Inspector of Buildings, 720 
Stone-cutting business at the Islands, 748 
Commercial-st. widening, 773 
Small-pox Hospital, 775 
Historical sites, 790 

Payment for extra services iu As.sessor3' Department, 803 
Annual Dinner of Council, 815 
Ro.xbury Canal, 833 
Printing and Binding — 

Annual reports authorized in print, a 2, c 4 

100 additional copies of Pi'oceedings of City Council authorized, 

a 2, c 5 
Municipal Register authorized, c 4, a 8 
Mayor's Inaugural Address, c 4, a 8 

Documents for Social Law Library, c 28, 35, a 41, c 97, a 100 
500 extra of Retrenchment and Salary report, authorized, a 92, 

c 95 
$4,500 additional appropriation, a 94, c 95, 124, a 130 
Printing at the Public Institut'ons, communication from direc- 
tors referred, c 479, a 490; remonstrance from Boston 
printers referred, a 586 
Superintendent of Printing, report of vacancy, referred, a 596, 

c603 
Army and Navy Monument Memorial, referred, a 616, o 620 ; 

report, order passed, a 632, c 634 
Charlestown Book of Posse.ssioiis, referred, a 745 ; report, 

order passed, a 766, c 789 
Binding documents and proceedings of City Council authorized, 
c 850, a 853 
Public Baths — 

Repairs and assistance authorized, a 19, c 35 
Annual report, a 823, c 827 
Public Buildings — (see also Schools) — 

Sale of Cooper-street armory estate, a 34, 41, c 48 

Furniture, repairs, etc., authorized, a 19, 29, c 48 

Egress from school-houses, order referred, c 36, a 41 

Annual report of Superintendent, a 55 

Expediency of lighting county buildings by Walworth plan, 

referred, a 267 
Quincy Hall, report on refitting and leasing, referred, a 278, 

c 286 ; order passed, a 305, c 308 
City Hall — expediency of second elevator, referred, c 26, a 29 

order passed to supply furniture, etc., a 29, c 48 

expediency of better ventilation in Council chamber, re- 
ferred, c 51, a 54, c 312, 325, a 850, 438,472,c478,a491, c 494 

use of elevator, order indefinitely postponed, c 143 

expediency of lighting by Walworth plan, referred, a 267, 

c270 

Reference Library, report on assigning a room , a 279, c 286 

Old Atherton School-house, sale authorized, a 509, c 51.3 
Curtis Hall, steam-heating authorized, c 549, a 551 
Lecture-room for College of Pharmacy, a 659 
Hire of offices in Pemberton square, a 659, c 669, 690, a 824, 

c827 
Highland Municipal Court Building, claim of W. R. Huston a 

796, c 803, c 829, a 840 
Police Station in Charlestown, referred, a 821, c 827 
Improved Sewerage, lease of rooms, a 824, c 846 
Public Institutions — 

Request for transfer of $500 for home for female paupers at 
Austin Farm, referred, a 17, c 23; report, referred to 
Finance Com., a 71, c 72 ; orders passed, a 93 
Marcella-street Home, communication referred, c 123, a 130 ; 

report, 199 ; order passed, a 210, c 217 
Expediency of iadustrial schools, referred, a 202, c 206 
New piggery at Deer Island, a 266, c 270 
Annual report, a 363 

PrintinL' .at Public Institutions — see Piiotins. 
Report on Treatment of Drunkenness, referred, a 580, c 090 
Stone-cutting at Deer Island, referred, a G98, c 701 ; report, 
c 743; order passed, o 748, a 760 
Public Lands — 

Annual report of Superintendent, c -30 

Confirmatory deed to Henrietta L. T. Wolcott, a 56, c 53 



INDEX TO PUOCEEDINGS OF CITr COUNCIL. 



XIII 



Land sold to Joseph F. Paul, on Bristol and Albanj' streets, for- 
feited, a, 94, c 95 

Reduction of rent to Thos. W. Carter, authorized, a 101, c 139, 
a 796, e, 803. 8'<;9, a s40, c 846, a 853 

($150 allowed to Ella Wynian. a 101 

Confirmatory deed to St. John's Umrersalist Parish, author- 
ized, a. 101 

$102 paid to Mary A. Rosemeyer, Northampton-street District, 
a 102 

Deed to Bank of Commonwealth authorized, c 221, a 223 

Northampton-st. District, $20,000 additional appropriation, 
a 279, c 286 

25 Oliver stree'-, forfeited, a 305, c 308 

Receivers of Mechanics' Mutual Fire Insurani-e Co. authorized 
to repay assessment on prlicies, a 305, c 324, a 450, c 479 

Committee to take possession of estates, c 315. a 318 

Report on petition of Joseph Hunneman and othei-s, a 328, 361, 
c381 

Order passed for releases on Winship place, a 379, c 382 

Release to Hunneman, a 413, o 440, a 696 

Several bonds cancelled, a 436, c 440, a 636, c 540, a 596, c 603, 
a 767, 796, c 803 

Two lots on West Castle street forfeited, a 536, c 540 

Renewal of conditions in deed to .'Vbner Kingman, a 617 

Forfeiture of estate on East Fourth street, a 699 

Forfeiture of estate on M street, a 699, c 701 

.Lot on Washington sq. forfeited, a 761, 769, c 770 

Release of 111 Warrenton st., a 795, c 803 

Extra appropriation referred, c 814, a 820 ; report, c SS5 
Public Library — 

Expediency of Branch in West Roxbury, referred, c 40, a 41 
report, a 296, c 308 ; order passed, a 322, c 355 

South Boston Branch, report on additional accommodations, 
referred, a 149, c 158 ; report, inexpedient, c 549, a 551 

Offer of Mercantile Library, c 274 ; order passed, c 292, a 296 

Petition of trustees for authority to make a contract with 
superintendent, a 468 ; salary increased, a 468, c 478 

Bequest from Charlotte Harris, referred, c 530, a 633; report, 
orders passed, c 549, a 551 

Annual report, a 565 

Request to use unexpended money for salaries, referred, a 760 ; 
report, a 784, c 789 

Dedication of Jamaica Plain Branch, printing proceedings, re- 
ferred, c 779, a 781 ; order passed, a 843, c 846 
Public Parks — 

Annual report of Parit Commissioners, c 16 

Charles-river embankment, a 117 

Order passed to petition for amendment of act, a 267, c 271 , a 277 

Report of joint special committee, a 301 ; considei-at-on, a 339, 
365, 413, 438; order passed, a 474 c 47 8; committee in- 
structed to procure estimates, c 480, a 490 ; report, order 
rejected, reconsideration, c 498 ; order passed, c 523, a 533 

Tisit by Common Council, c 315 

Horatio Harris estate, c 315, 325 

Petitions presented, a 438 

Setting apart play-grounds, referred, o 531, a 533 

Order passed to petition for authority for loan, a 660, c 675 

Mt. Bellevue, West Roxbury, offer from W. E. Elakemore, re- 
ferred, c 742, a 744 ; orders passed, c 815, a 820 

Additional appropriation, request referred, a 761, c 770 ; order 
passed, a 782, c 804 

Park Commissioners authorized to purchase, c 805, 817, a 821 

Sixth report of Commissioners, a 841, c 846 

FUIing up Back Bay Park, order passed, a 843, c 846 

Record Commissioners — 

Authorizing second report referred, a 227, c 228 ; order passed, 
a 279, c 286 

Third report received, a 704 

Printing Charlestown Book of Possessions, referred, a 766 ; re- 
port, order passed, a 766, c 789 
Reed, Ward 17 — • remarks : 

Salaries and duties of city officers, 37, 140, 165, 191 

Boards and commissions, 76 

Sinking Funds, 121 

Salary of Supt. < f Dover-st. Bridge, 381, 404 

Free Ferries, 496, 516 
Refreshments, etc. — see Contingent Expenses. 
Registrars of Voters — 

Request for information whether new member has entered on 
duties of office, c 467, a 471 

Authorized to employ assistance, a 766, c 789, a 795 

Extra sessions for registration of voters, c 743, a 744 ; amended 
order, c 770 
Rewards — 

Mary Ella Harrington, a 285 ; paid, a 583 

$500 for detection of robbers of Asa A. Breed, a 640 
Richardson, Ward 10 — remarks : 

Badges, 24 

Salaries, names and residences of city officers, 40, 167, 188 

Estates sold for assessments, 60 

Work for poor citizens, 61 

Abolition of Assistant Assessors, 98 

Appropriation Bill, 228 

Mr. Keith's appointment to Board of Health, 272 

License Commissioners, 288, 662, 676 

Play-grounds, 326 

Mvstic Valley Sewer, 329 



Fence on Commonwealth ave., 387 

Army and Navy Monument, 440 

Public Parks, 4S0, 504, 527 

Occupancy of streets for buiUVniK, 513, 646 

Free Ferries, 621 

Improved Sewerage, 530 

Tax titles, 631 

Vacations for Inremen, 542 

Inspection of Lime, 606 

Extra pay for September 17, 608 

Messenger for Treasury Dejiartment, 620 

Care of hot ashes, 6-38 

Investigation of Department of Common, etc., 656 

Duties of city officers, 656 

Loans for Public Parks, 675 

Investigation of Fire Commissioners, 678 

Hiring rooms in Pemberton square, 690 

Opportunity for city employes to vote, 692 

Appointment of Inspector of Buildings, 738 

Commercial-st. widening, 750, 792, 804, 829 

Employes on Fire-boat, 778, 794 

Roxbury Caral, 789, 831, 849 

Historic sites, 789 

Surveyors of highways, 816 

Squantum bridge, 8'-8, 848 
Richardson , Ward 11 — rema rks : 

Mystic Valley Sewer, 309 

Public Parks, 479 

Stony Brook, 718 

Sma.ll-po,x Hospital, 776 

Payment for exti-a services in Assessors' Department, 804 
Robinson , Alderman — remarks ; 

On election of chairman, 5 

Retrenchment in expenditures, 10 

Cost of publishing orders of notice, 20 

Loiterers in City Hall, 46, 54 

Exhibition on (Jommon, 57, 112, 1.30 

Tracks on Columbus ave., 155, 172 

Protection of burial-grounds, 157 

Care of truants, 202, 210 

Ninth-street improvement and work for laborers, 204 

Play-ground on Conmion, 211 

Fruit-stands in streets, 239, 262 

Appropriation Bill, 243 

Boats on Public Garden pond, 248 

South Boston R. K.,251 

Charles-river Park, 269 

Equitable valuation of property, 306 

Vacant stores and tenements, 307 

Petition for new Gas Co., 318, 800 

Public Parks, 348, 374, 414 

Wales-street drainage, 379 

Police for Bath Houses, 380 

Asphalt pavement, 395, 437, 461 

Supt. of permits for occupation of parts of streets, 438 

Salary of Supt. of Public Library, 470 

Free Ferries, 488 

Police Sergeant Clark, 492 

Proposed visit of Governors, 537 

Horse-car blockades, 539, 584, 590, 619, 644 

Improved Sewerage, 574 

Limit of City Indebtedness, 590 

Inspection of Lime, 599 

Constables, 609 

Blackstone-square accident, 610, 646 

Rejection of policeman, 613 

Paving Richmond street, 615 

Police Boat " Protector," 629 

East Boston High School, 648 

Removal of tow-horses from South Russell street, 647 

Discharge of laborers in Paving Department, 667 

Wines, etc., at city entertainments, 658 

Ward-room in Ward 24, 659, 700 

Investigation of Common, etc., 689 

Refreshments and bills, 684 

South Boston Railroad location, 698 

Police rules and regulations, 704, 840 

Metropolitan Railroad, 728, 837 

Roxbury Canal, 765, 786 

Industrial Schools, 799 

Metropolitan Railroad location in Washington street, 821 

Congress-st. Widening, 854 
Roxbury Canal — 

Dredging authorized, a 708 ; report referred, a 726, c 728 ; re- 
port, a 740, 769, 763 ; orders for loan, and to take land, 
passed, a 788, c 789 ; referred to next City Government, 
c831, 848, a 853 
Ruffin, Ward 9 — ^remarks : 

Badges, 24 

Salaries, 40 

Pay of street laborers, 59 

Work for poor citizens, 62 

Boards and commissions, 74 

Common Council refreshment bills, 98 

Claim of Louise Woodworth Foss, 124 

Mechanics' Fair and the Common. 127 

System of valuation, 206 

License Commissioners, 276, 653 



XIY 



INDEX TO PKOCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Mr. Keith's appoiatment to Board of Health, 293 

Horatio Harris Estate for Park, 325 

Play-grouuds, 328 

Licease Commissioners, 384 

Mystic Valley Sewer, 405 

Army and Navy Monument, 442 

Public Parks, 503 

Police Boat " Protector," 636 

Duties of city officers, 656 

Additional Appropriation for Common, 691 

Care of Public Grounds, 692, 794 

Inspection of bills in Auditor's office, 693 

Appointment of Inspector of Buildings, 722 

Investigation of Common, etc., 810 

Claims of John Raddin, 827 

Rules and Orders — 

Of Aldermen — of 1876, adopted, S ; committee, 3 ; report, 8 
Of Council — of 1876, adopted, 4 ; committee, 6 ; report, 14 
Joint — of 1876, adopted, a 3, o 4 ; committee, a 3, c 4 ; report, 

amendment adopted, a 8, c 13 
Pocket edition autaorized, c 4, a 8 

Order of inquiry referred, c 257, a 258; report, amendments 
adopted, a 279, c 289 j recommittal, o 292 j_iudefinite post- 
ponement, a 318 

Salaries — 

Order relating to retrenchment passed, a 10, c 13 

Proposed department for purchase of supplies, referred, c 28, 
a 29 

Older to report names, residences, and salaries of city officers and 
employes passed, c 37 ; reconsidered, amended and passed, 
c 40 ; laid on table, a 41 

Order to report duties of salaried officers passed, c 40 ; laid on 
table, a 43 

Report of Joint Special Commiteee on Retrenchment, a 89 ; 
ordinances passed, a 102, c 140, 160, 183, a 197 

Report of Joint Standing Committee on Salaries, a 91 

Pensions for the Police, e 145 ; indefinite postponement, c 158 

Salaries for court officers, a 157 

Inspector of Provisions, c 207, a211,c 257, a267, 285, c286, 311, 
a 320, 324, 334 

Supt. of North Beacon-st. and Western-ave. bridge, a 258, c 270 

S500 to Assistant of City Architect, a 36+, c 407 

Supt. of Dover-street Bridge, $2,.50O, a 379, c 381, a 391, c 403 

Clerks in Fire Commissioners' office, c 408 

Duties of Retrenchment Committee, c 440, 429, a 432 

Equalizing pay of Water Inspectors, c 447, a 449 

Water Board authorized to fix pay of employes, c 467, a 471 

Of Supt. of Public Library, see Public Library. 

Order piissed relating to salaries of employes of Public Institu- 
tions, a 477, c 478 

Sealers of Weights and Measures, a 436, 457, 492, c 494, a 510, 
c 514, a 535, c 545, 550, a 556, c 567, a 579, 584, c 621 

City Engineer, referied, c 532 ; indefinitely postponed, a 533 

Clerk of Pen-ies, c 549, a 551 

License Commissioners, request referred, a 617; report, order 
passed, a 641 ; rejected, c 651, 656, 675, 836, 846 

Treasurer's Messenger, a 646, c 675 

Salaries for members of City Government, c 702, 743, 776 ; re- 
ferred to next City Government, c 834, a 840 

Salaried officials to devote their time to city, report, a 825 ; re- 
ferred to next City Council, c 828, a 840 

Sampson, Ward 17 — remarks : 

Appointment of Nominating Committees, 4 

lletrenchment in expenditures, 14 

Badges, 24 

Management of sinking funds and city debt, 27, 119, 140, 144, 

181, 217 
Salaries and duties of city officers, 38, 140 
Pay of street laborers, 59 
Bills for furnishing supplies, 118 
Mechanics' Fair and tlie Common, 128 
The Appropriation Bill, 228, 258 

Mr. Keith's appointment to Board of Health, 257, 271. 310 
New building at Deer Island, 270 
Second Assistant Assessors, 270 
Public Parks, 271, 478, 482, 805, 813 
English High and Lacin School-house, 324 
Play-grounds, 328 

Clerk for License Commissioners, 353 
Civilities to distinguished strangers, 858 
Salary of Supt. of Dover-street Bridge, 403 
Fire corner Shawmut ave. and Pleasant street, 408 
Laborers in Paving Department, 409 
Inspection of buildings, 447 
Sealers of Weights and Measures, 513, 545 
Improved Sewerage, 530. 544, 559, 635 
Vacations for firemen, 542 
Northampton-street District, 603 
Inspection of Lime, 604 

Additional Appropriation for Common, 655, C72 
Refreshments, etc., G73 
Loans for Public Parks, 075 
License Commi-ssioners, 676 
Hiring rooms in Pemberton square, 690 
Care of public grounds, 693 
Inspection of bills in Auditor's office, 693 



Release of land to heirs of John English, 702 

Vegetable JJarket, 719 

Stone-cutting business at the Islands, 748 

Small-pox Hospital, 775 

Commercial-st widening, 804 

Claim of John Raddin, 827 

Claim of Martin Milmore, 835 
Schools — see also Industrial Schools. 

Requests from School Committee, referred, relating to Primary 
schools on Washington street and Codman park, and to 
AllstonSchool, al7,c23 

Furniture for new school-house. West Roxbury, authorized, 
c 95, a 100 

S28,000 additional appropriation, c 97, a 100, c 124, a 130, c 141 

Paving Bennett School yard, referred, c 123, a 130, 321 

Vacation Schools, referred, c 123, a 130; report, discussion, and 
recommittal, a 280, c 286, a 321, c 324, a 328, 361, c 382, a 389, 
438, c 440, 460 

Gordon-st. School-yard enlargement, referred, o 123, a 130 

Egleston square accommodations, referred, c 123 

AUston School location and building, referred, c 123, a 130 

Dorchester School-house windows, referred, c 123, a 130, c 255 

Gaston District, report on site, c 124, a 130 

Andrew District, request referred, c 207, a 211 

Adams School, request referred, c 236, a 238 ; report, repairs 
authorized, c 466, a 472 

Remonstrance of School Committee against reduction of appro- 
))riation, c 233, a 238 

English High and Latin Schools, report, a 280 ; referred, a 305, 
c 308 ; order passed, a 322, c 355 

AUston District, request for additional accommodations, re- 
ferred, c 311, a 318, c 430, a 432, c 440, 531, 544, a 554, c 567 

Primary School-house on Weston street, c 383, a 389 

Temporary building at Egleston square, c 383, a 389 

East Boston Branch High School, request from School Com- 
mittee, referred, c 385, a 389 

Tickets for School Festival, c 388 

Public School Musical Exhibitions, a 401, 477 

Brimmer School-house, order referred, c 467, a 472 ; report, 
order passed, c 549, a 551 

School furniture for St. John, N.B., a 491, c 494 ; thanks of St. 
John , a 580 

Everett school, Dorchester, furniture authorized, a 581, c 603 

Brighton school-houses, requests referred, c 622, a 627 ; re- 
port, c 779 

School Sessions, discussion, c 637 

Old Lyman school-house, E. B., for High School, c 621, a 627, 
647, 658, c 669, a 682, e 690, 850 

Requests referred for fire escapes from Latin and English High 
School ; to enlarge yard of Andrew School ; to present plan 
of buildings for AUston School, c 690, a 697 

New High and Latin school-house, purchase of wall, a 699, c 701, 
719, a 725 

Release of betterment title on site in Brighton, to heirs of 
English, c 701, 719, a 725 

Brimmer School-building, request for information indefinitely 
postponed, c 690 ; request referred, c 742; indefinitely 
postponed, a 744 

Condition of School-houses, Inspector of Buildings to report, 
c. 779 ; laid on table, a 782 ; indefinitely postponed, a 856 

Seventeenth of June — 

Order offered, c 194 ; passed, committee appointed, c 206, a 211 
Sewers — (see also Improved Sewerage.) 
Mystic Valley — see Water. 
Annual report of Superintendent, c 36 
Stony Brook — see Stony Brook Improvement. 
Back Bay Nuisance — Board of Health to report, c 315, a 318 ; 

report of committee, a 322 
Muddy Brook drainage, referred, c 387 
AVales-street drainage, report, a 379 
$2,000 to Charles B. Gardner, assignee, a 450 
Orders of notice of intention to take land, a 472, 587 
Sewer in Maudlin street, referred, a 535 
Resolves and orders to take land, a 536, 555, 587, 597, 612 
Ro.Kbury Canal, — see heading Roxbury Canal. 
Order to construct in Chambers street, 267 

" " " " Whitney street, 267 

" " " " Centre street, 267 

" " " '■ Sargent street, 301 

" " " " Dorchester St., 301 

" " " " Starr St., 301 

" " " " Newborn St., 301 

" " " " Meander St., 321 

" " " " Norwich St., 321 

" " " " Boylston St., 365 

" " " " Gibson St., 365 

" " " "Dorchester ave., 365 

" " " " Mather St., 365 

" " " " Fairfield St., 395 

" " " " North Market St., 450 

" " " " Wyman st., 450 

" " " '' Lamartinest , 450 

" " " "Moon St., 450 

" " " " Savin HUl ave., 4.50 

" " " " Sagamore St., 450 

" " " " Wesley St., 490 

" " " " Washington St., 490 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS, OF CUT COUNCIL. 



XV 



Order to construct in Burr St., 510 

" " " " Avon place, Roxburv, 510 

■' " " " India St., 510 

" " " " Garden St., 510 

" " " " AValnut St., 536 

" " " " Adams St., 555 

" " " '• Curtis St., 555 

" " '• " Forbes place and Bowc .<t., 555 

" " '» " Taylor street, 581 

" " •' " Cedar avenue. West Roxburj': 583 

" " "■ " John A. Andrew street, 583 

" " " " Maudlin street, 587 

" " " " Maple street, 687 

" " " " Jenkins street, 597 

" " " " Canal street, 597 

" " " " Haymai-ket square, 597 

" " " " St. James avenue, 602 

" " " " Rockland street, 612 

" " " " Jenkins street, 612 

" '■ " " Tuckerman street, 612 

" " " " Dorchester .street, 612 

" " " " Blue Hill avenue to Warren'street, 612 

" " " " Warren street, 612 

" " " " Crawford street, 612 

" " " " Thomas street, 646 

" " " " Washington street, 600 

" " " " Ferry street, 660 

" " " " Dudley street, 660 

" " '• " Thornton street, 660 

" '■ " " Thomas street, 682 

" " " >' A street, ti82 

" " '■■ " Northampton street, 698 

" " " " Summit street, 698 

" '• " " Cunard street, 726 

Shepard, Ward i — remarks : 

Release of land to heirs of John English, 702 
Sibley, Ward 5 — remarks : 

Retrenchment in expenditures, 13 
Badges, 24 

Abolition of Assistant Assessors; 73 
Boards and commissions, 77 
Mechanics' Fair and the Common, 123 
Salaries of city officers, 188 
Play-ground on Common, 209 
Appropriation Bill, 231 
East Boston Ferries, 271 
Fourth of July, 273 
License Commissioners, 287, 652, 676 
Joint Rules and Orders, 289 
Mystic Valley Sewer, 309. 42S 
Ventilation of Council Chamber, 313 
Police for License Commissioners, 355 
Army and Navy Monument, 441 
Public Parks, 478, 481 
Free Ferries, 496 
Vacations for firemen, 541 
Sealers of Weights and Measures, 545 
Improved Sewerage, 566 
Inspection of Lime, 604 
Police boat " Protector ", 636 
Care of hot ashes, 6-39 
Investigation of Fire Commissioners, 677 
Employes on Fire-boat, 794 
Roxbury Canal, 832, 849 
Sinking Funds — 

Order on management referred, c 26, a 29 ; report, c"124 ; orders 

rejected, c 143 
Unexpended balances of appropriations, a 70, 80 ; ordinance 
passed, a 110; discussed, referred to Finance Committee, 
c 118, a 130; report, ordinance passed, c 139; amended, 
a 176 ; non-concurrence, c 181 ; concurrence, a 197 
Order for equalizing taxation, a 157, 171, c 181 
Order to report amendments of ordinances to conform to 

statutes, a 179, c 181, a 197 ; report, a 825, c 827 
Appropriation required, communication referred, a 198, c 206 
Auditor requested to furnish estimates, c 208; reconsideration, 
order rejected, c 217 ; order passed, c 236, a, 238, c 255, a 258 
Ordinance authorizing reductions passed, c 217, a 223 
Annual report, 363, 395 
Slade, Alderman — remarks : 
On election of chairman, 2 
Exhibition on Common, 133 
Tracks on Columbus ave., 155, 174 
Play-ground on Common, 213 
Appropriation Bill, 247 
South Boston R. R.,251 
Fruit-stands in streets, 264 
Vacation Schools, 281 

Salary of Inspector of Provisions, 285, 319, 337 
Scalers of Weights and Measures, 297, 426, 436, 457, 511, 579, 584 
Refreshment Bills, 319 
Public Parks, 374, 413 
Wales-street drainage, 379 
Police for Bath Houses, 380 
Asphalt pavement, 397, 454 
Mystic Valley Sewer, 425 
Salary of Supt. of Public Library, 471 
Horse-car blockades, 539, 591 



Limit of city indebtedness, 589 

Inspection of Lime, .599 

Printing Army and Navy Memorial, 632 

License Commissioners, 642 

Dressed Poultry, 647 

East Boston High School, 649 

Blackstone square accident, 666 

Refreshments, etc., 685 

Expenditures for Common, etc., 689 

Vegetable Market, 709 

Metropolitan Railroad, 728, 837 

Roxbury Canal, 788 

Industrial School, 797 

Claim of John Raddin, 825 

Management of horse railroads, 845 
Smardon , Ward 10 — remarks : 

Joint Rules and Orders, 290 

Investigation of Department of Common, etc., 656, 672 
Soup for the Poor — 

Report from Chief of Police, 225 

Order appropriating $4,800 referred, c 779, a 781 
South Boston Flats — 

Request to construct B or steeet, a 709, c 719 
South Boston R. R. Co. — 

Hearing on running cars from southern to northern depots, 
a 88 ; report, a 149, 171 

Hearing on uniting Federal and Kneeland street tracks, a 170 ; 
order passed, a 266 

Thirteenth location, to northern depots, granted, a 249 

Location accepted, a 278 

Location at Old Colony Station, a 412, 698, 708 

Hearing on petition to lay down tracks in Canal street, a 402 ; 
leave to withdra-w, a 536 

15th location accepted, a 782 

Petition for new connections referred, a 781 

Curved tracks on Sixth-st. , report, 783 

Location accepted, a 839; order rescinded, a 843 
Souther, Ward 14 — remarks : 

Salaries, 168 
Spenceley, AVard 19 — remarks : 

Admission to ante-room, 6 

Retrenchment in expenditures, 13 

Badges, 25 

Regulation of quacks, .39 

Uniform for Fire Commissioners, 49 

Salaries and duties of city oificers, 37, 164, 187 

Labor for poor citizens, 60 

Sinking Funils, 120, 145, 182, 218 

Mechanics' Fair and the Common, 125, 138 

Management of public grounds, 139, 159 

I'ensions for police, 145, 158 

Play-ground on Common, 208, 314 

System of valuation, 207 

Appropriation Bill, 229, 253 

Certificates of Firemen, 253 

Mr. Keith's appointment to Board of Health, 255, 273, 294 

Acceptance of Mercantile Library, 274 

License Commissioners, 288, 353, 383, 653 

Joint Rules and Orders, 290 

Board of Health, 294, 324 

Ventilation of Council Chamber, 312 

Horatio Harris Estate for Park, 326 

Means of egress from Public Buildings, 328 

Mystic Valley Sewer, 331, 406, 429 

Contracts only to citizens, 356 

Official report, 359 

Salary of Supt. of Dover-street Bridge, 381, 403 

Vacation for firemen, 386, 494, 540 

Management of Fire Boat, 387 

Fire corner Shawmut ave. and Pleasant street, 408 

Duties of Fire Commissioners, 408 

Salary of clerks in Fire Commissioners' ofBce, 409 

Laborers in Paving Department, 410 

Duties of Retrenchment Committee, 410, 429 

Visit to Sudbury River, 357, 430 

Personal explanations, 430 

Buildings to be inspected, 431 

Ai-my and Navy Jlonument, 443 

Civilities to distinguished strpougers, 459 

Repairs on Adams School-house, 466 

Storage of gunpowder, 468 
. Public Parks, 479, 481, 504, 529 

Sale of Atherton School building, 513 

Occupancy of streets for building, 513, 547 

Improved Sewerage, 530, 504 

Refreshments, etc., 531 

Sealers of IVeights and Measures, 546 

Inspection of Lime, 605 

Extra pay for Sept. 17, 608, 621 

Messenger for Treasury Department, 620 

Police boat " Protector", 6-'2 

School sessions, 637 

Care of hot ashes, 638 

Wines, etc., at city entertainments, 039 

Additional appropriation for Common, 655 

Investigation of Department of Conunon, etc., 656 

Duties of city officers, 666 

Hiring rooms in Pemberton square, 669, 690 



XVI 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Invesfcigatiou of Fire Commissioners, 677, 734 

Inspection of llefresliuieut bills, 676, 743 

Brimmer school building, 690 

Sterling-street extension, 691 

Care of public grounds, 693 

Election of Inspector of Euildings, 701, 738 

Salaries for members of City Government, 702 

Commercial -St. -widening, 756, 804 

Paj'ment of caiTiage-bills, 770 

Employes on Fire -boat, 778, 794 

Historic sites, 791 

Payment for extra services in Assessors' Department, 803 

Reduction of rent to T. W. Carter, 803 

Ordinance in relation to Fire Department, 833 
State Aid — 

Committee, a 2, c 5 

Quarterly repjrt of Paymaster, a 9, 225, 472, 626 
Stone, Ward 3 — remarks : 

Pay of street laborers, 59, 206 

Estates sold for assessments, 60 

"Work for poor citizens, 61 

Sinking Funds, 119 

Bills for furnishing supplies, 118 

Claim of Louise Woodworth Foss, 124 

Mechanics' Fair and the Common, 126 

Management of Public Grounds, 139 

Salaries of city officers, 140, 169 

Use of City Hall Elevator, 143 

Second Assistant Assessors, 158 

Appropriation Bill, 229 

License Commissioners, 287 

Mystic Valley Sewer, 309 

Visit to the Parks, 315 

Public Parks, 502, 813, 817 

Messens^er for Treasury Department, 620 

Tolicc boat " Protector", 622, 636 

Armory in Charlestown. 719 

Small-pox Hospital, 776 

Stony Brook Improvement — ■ 

Report of Street Commissioners, a 92 ; referred, a 365, c 381 

Release of land, a 587 

Report retoned, a 707, c 718, 724 

Report orders )jasscd, a 732, c 734, 748 ; laid on table, c 773 ; 
order rejected, c 793 ; reconsideration, orders passed, c 805, 
816 
Streets — 

Annual report of Comnsissioners, c 15 

Supei-intendent authorized to remove structures on sidewalks, 
grant permits to open streets, number streets, purchase 
horses and supplies, furnish and set edgestones, pave side- 
walks, erect fences, lay crosswalks, and pave gutters, a 19, 29 

Committee authorized to refer claims to arbitration, a 33 

Oliver-street improvement, rescinding order of Sept. 30, 1867, 
c36, 48, a54 

Betterments assumed, Swett street, a 71, 88 

Committee authorized to arrange for conveyance of cross-dam 
to city, a 94, c 95 

Beach-street wid-'niug, conveyance to Moses Williams, c 98, a 100 

$5,000 additional appropriation, c 142, a 149 

Expediencj' of watering main avenues referred, a 198 

Niuth-strcet improvement, and work for laborers, referred, a 
202, c 208, 386, a 390, c 403, a 436, 448, c 479 

Annual report of Supt., a 225 

Order of notice to quit on River street, a 207 

Closing up and building over fifty feet of street, between 
Columbus ave. and Dartmouth st., c 329, 357, a 363 

Asphalt pavement, petition referred, a 320 ; discussion, recom- 
mittal, a 395 ; report, a 437 ; order passed, a 451 

Unsafe bv\ilding on Mill street, referred, c 431, a 432 

Consultation relative to B street, a 509, c 513 

Horse-car blockades, order of inquiry passed, a 538 

Relocation of Western ave., Brighton, a 491, 535, 641, 646 

Release to Liberty Square Warehouse Co., c 549, a 551 

Release of land adjoining Rockland street, c 549, a 551 

Purchase of estate of Mrs. Ellis authorized, a 556, c 567 

Butchers' Slaughtering and Melting Association, railroad, 
a 614, 641 

Sale of building corner Boylston street and Chester park, a 633, 
c634 

Relocating of streets, order to petition, c 656, a 658 

Commercial street widening — Com. from Commissionei'S, a 93 ; 
reference, a 149, cl58; request to report, c 446, a 449, c 482 ; 
report, reference, c 497, a 507, c 513, a 557, c 568, a 679 ; re- 
port inexpedient, a 618 ; order passed, a 629, c 635, 658, 
656 ; rejected, c 792 ; reconsideration, c 794, 804 

Sterling-street extension, request for estimate, c 691, a 697 ; re- 
port referred, a 761, c 770 ; order passed, c 829, a 839 

Plan to relieve the blockade, a 697 

Permission to erect bridge over Milk-st., ji'om Old South 
Church, a 726 

Congress-st. Improvement, order passed, c 849, a 853 

$2,250 to James Dennie, a 842 

— A St., grade established, 767 ; grading, 783 

— Alden St., paving, a 320 

— Adams st., grade, macadamize, a 320 

— Adams street, order to " quit ", 581 

— Albany street, repair bridge, 596 



— Beacon street, sprinkling, a 240 

— Blue Hill ave., sprinkling, 279 

— Brighton ave., sprinkling, a 240 

— Brookliue ave., " a 240 

— Boylston St., W. Koxbury, edgestones, crossing, a 320 

— Boylston avenue, grade, macadamize, etc., a 320 

— Boston St., sprinkling, a 321 

— • Bishop St., edgestones, gutters, macadamize, 321 

— Broadway, repave, 364 

— Beech St., paving, 490 

— Brookline and Longwood avenues, sprinkling, a 474 

— Canal St., Charlestown, grade established, a 71 

— Cambridge st., paving, a 320 

— Commonwealth ave., edgestones, gutters, crosswalks, macadam- 

izing, a 338 

— Cottage St., sprinkling, 321 

— Charlestown St., paving tracks of Middlesex R. R., a -392; rc- 

paving, 392 

— Charles St., paving, 474 

— Centre St., Roxbury, sprinkling, 536 

— Cambridge St., Charlestown, Middlesex R. R, Co. to pave tracks, 

364 

— Columbus avenue, stone blocks adjacent to I'ailroad, edgestones, 

sidewalks, 587 ; delay of paving referred, c 701 

— Cross street, paving, 616 

— Call St., Jamaica Plain, named, 767 

— Chestnut ave., named, 821 

— Dorchester avenue, grade established, a 71 

— Dearborn St., sprinkling, a 338 

— Dartmouth place, edgestones, sidewalks, gutters, 587 

— Dix Street, open and grade, 659 

— Downer st., grading, 761 

— Eliot square, Roxbury, sprinkling, 536 

— Eustis St., " "338 

— Eastern ave., grade established, a 267 

— Everett St., Jamaica Plain, named, 767 

— Fourth St., repave, 364 

— Franklin ave., closed for repairs, 392 

— I'ort Hill square, pave sidewalk, 412 

— Guild St., edgestones, paved gutters, 436 

— Gouch St., name changed to Norman St., 795 

— Hudson street, grade established, a 71 

— Highland St., sprinkling, a 321 

— Humphrey St., sprinkling, 321 

— Holbrook st., grade and gravel, 510 

— Harrison ave., sprinkling, 433 

— Huntington ave., grading, macadamizing, fences, plank walks 

536 

— Isabella street, grading and paving, a 240 

— India St., paving, 392 

— Kilbj' St., crosswalk, a 392 

— Lincoln St., Charlestown, grade established, a 71 

— Lamartine st., edgestones, gutters, 364; revised grade, 761 

— Longwood avenue bridge, closed for repairs, 583 

— Liverpool street, edgestones and roadway, 580 

— Mercer street, paved sidewalks, 279 

— Mt. Everett St., grading, a 320 

— Marginal st., crosswalk, 510 ; paving, 615 

— Miller St., Charlestown, edgestones, gutters, sidewalks, 510 

— Mill street, raise and grade, culvert, retaining walla, 583 ; grade 

established, 761 

— Meridian street, repave, 587 

— Marginal street, paving, 616 

— Myrtle street, edgestones, gutters, roadway, 682 

— Northampton St., paving, a 320 

— Norman St., named, 795 

— Old Harbor street, edgestones and gutters, a 279 

— P St., edgestones, gutters, 321 

— Park St., W. Rox., grade, gravel, a 364 

— Roxbury St., sprinkling, 320 

— River st., Dorchester, grading, macadamizing, a 460 

— Pvichmond street, paving, 615 

— Sixth St., edgestones, gutters, 321 

— Spring Garden St., grade, gravel, a 363 

— Sherman St., edgestones, gutters, .sidewalks, a 363 

— South and Centre sts.,W. Roxbury, edgestones, macadamize, 

364 

— Sargent St., grade, macadamize, 412 

— Swett St., grading, 436 

— Summer street, Dorchester District, edgestones and sidewalks, 

580 

— Sparhawk street, edgestones, gutters, 587 

— Shelby St., order to quit, 825 

— Trinity place, edgestones, gutters, sidewalks, 364 

— Tremont St., repave, 364 ; paving, 392 

— Walnut ave., water, a 320 

— Warren St., sprinkling, 321 

— West Chester Park, grading, maoadamiziug, fences, plank walks 

338 

— Washington St., sprinkling, 338 ; plank walk, 364 

— Warren St., paving, 412 

— Wales St., edgestones, gutters, macadamizing, 364 

— Washington street (Brighton), macadamize, 587 

— Wyman St., revised grade, 761 
Suffolk-street District — see Claims. 
Summer Vacation — 

Order laid on table, c 482 ; passed, c 5-50, a 587, 59 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



XVII 



Taxes — (see heading, Auditor of Accounts.) 

Petition from James Deshon vefei-ied, c 48 
Thompson, Alderman — remarks : 

Retrenchment in expenditures, 11, 41, 102 

Cost of publishing orders of notice, 20 

Election of Trustees of Public Library, 29 

Union Freight Railroad, 46 
' Equitable yaluation of property, 54, 306 

Exhibition on Common, 57, 111 

Appointment of special police at Boston and Maine R. R., 72 

Management of sinking funds, 85 

Exhibition on Common, 134 

Tracks on Columbus ave., 150, 173 

List of Jurors, 157 

System of taxation, 175 

Care of truants, 200, 210 

Ninth-street improveiiient, and work for laborers, 202 

South Boston Railroad, 216, 249 

Appropriation for Schools, 238 

Appropriation Bill, 241, 261 

East Boston Ferries, 258, 657 

Middlesex R.R., 266 

New piggery at Deer Island, 266 

Charles-river Park, 267 

Joint rules and orders, 279 

Vacation Schools, 280, 361, 389 

Salary of Inspector of Provisions, 285 

Sealers of "Weights and Measures, 301, 426, 457 

Vacant stores and tenements, 307 

Registrar of Voters, 316 

Petition for new Gas Co., 318, 800 

Refreshment Bills, 318 

Salary of Inspector at Abattoir, 319, 335 

Army and Navy Monument, 321, 592 

Public Parks, 348, 378, 418, 476, 821 

Play-grounds, 350 

License Commissioners, 350, 642 

Northampton-street District, 361, 597 

Salary of Supt. Dover-street Bridge, 391 

Asphalt Pavement, 320, 396, 437, 451 

Public school musical Exhibitions, 401 

Mystic Valley Sewer, 424, 434, 458, 472 

AUston School, 433 

Salary of Supt. Pub. Library, 469 

Widening Commercial street, 508 

Free access to horse railroad cars, 511 

Proposed visit of Governors, 536 

Horse-car blockades, 539, 591, 618 

Occupation of streets for building, 554 

Purchase of estate of Mrs. Ellis, 556 

Inspection of Lime, 598 

Constables, 609, 626 

Blackstone-square accident, 609, 667 

Rejection of policeman, 613 

Paving Richmond street, 615 

East Boston High School, 627, 649 

Printing Army and Navy Memorial, 616 

Refreshments, etc., 687 

South Boston Railroad location, 698 

Vegetable Market, 716 

Metropolitan Railroad, 730, 837 

Brimmer School, 744 

Roxbury Canal, 759, 765, 788 

Forfeiture of land on Washington sq., 761, 769 

Small Pox Hospital, 781 

Industrial School, 783, 799 

Nuisance in Charlestown, 788, 796 

Improved Sewerage, 799 

Claim of John Raddin, 826 

Management of horse-railroads, 845 

Congress-st. widening, 853 

Middlesex Railroad, extra cars, 856 
Thompson, "Ward 9 — remarks : 

Election of Ferry Directors, 15 

Badges, 23 

Salaries and duties of city officers, 37, 164, 190 

Petition of James Deshon, 48 

Uniform for Fire Commissioners, 49 

Contract for water-pipes, 72 

Boards and Commissions, 76 

Abolition of Assistant Assessors, 98 

Sinking Funds, 119, 144, 181 

Mechanics' Fair and the Common, 126 

Contingent Fund, 142 

Play -ground on Common, 209, 315 

Certificates of Firemen, 253 

Mr. Keith's appointment to Board of Health, 255, 272, 293, 310 

Public Parks, 271, 478, 480, 498, 502, 527, 805, 813, 815, 817 

Acceptance of Mercantile Library, 274 

License Commissioners, 288, 328, 352, 383, 052, 836 

Joint Rules and Orders, 290 

Ventilation of Council Chamber, 313 

Visit to the Parks, 315 

Play-grounds, 327 

Mystic Valley Sewer, 330, 407 

Police for License Commissioners, 354 

Contracts only to tax-payers, 332, 355 

Cushing-'s Manual for members, 356 



Civilities to distinguished strangers, 357 

Official report, 359 

Salary of Supt of Dover-street Bridge, 381, 403 

Management of Fire-boat, 387 

Laborers in Paving Department, 410 

Duties of Retrenchment Committee, 410 

Occupancy of streets for building, 513 

Free Ferries, 518 

Personal explanation, 523 

Refreshments, etc., 531 

Northampton-street District, 603 

Inspection of Lime, 604 

Extra pay for September 17, 608 

Messenger for Treasury Department, 620 

Police boat " Protector ", 622, 636 

Additional appropriation for Common, 634, 654, 672 

Removal of Superintendent Common, 655 

Duties of city officers, 656 

Laborers on public grounds, 656 

Refreshments, etc., 674, 774 

Loans for public park, 675 

Investigation of Fire Commissioners, 677 

Release of land to heirs of John English, 702 

Stony Brook, 718 

South Boston Flats, 719 

Armory in Charlestown, 719 

Appointment of Inspector of Buildings, 720, 737, 740 

Commercial-st. widening, 753, 792, 804, 829 

Small Pox Hospital, 776 

Roxbury Canal, 789, 849 

Historic Sites, 790 

Management of Common, etc., 794 

Investigation of Common, etc., 808 

Pay of employes of Fire Boat, 794 
Thorndike, Ward 2 — remarks : 

Improved Sewerage, 560 
Treasury Department — 

Extra clerk-hire authorized, a 280 

$100 for clerk hire, c 310 

Annual report of treasurer, referred, c 357, a 363; report of 
committee on examination, c 445, a 449 

Special Messenger authorized, a 617, c 620, 635, a 640j c 675 

Taxes and betterments on site of Post Office extension, c 742, 
a 744 
Trees — 

Removals authorized, a 338, 436, 700, 797, 825 
Truant and Vagrant Home — see Public Institutions. 

Union Freight Railroad — 

Order restricting trains referred, a 46 
Track from Commercial street to Union Wharf, a 783, 820 
Unfinished busine.ss — 

Standing Committees directed to resume, c 4, a 8, 12 

Suffolk, Church and Northampton -street districts referred ro 

Committee on Public Lands, a 10, c 13 
Referred to next City Government : — 

Brighton High School building, c 779, a 781 

Joint Committee business, o 850, a 853 

Requiring salaried officers to devote whole time to citj^, 
c 828, a 840 

Bridge to Squantnm, c 828, 848 

Roxbury Canal, c 831, 848, a 853 

Ordinance i-elating to Fire Department, c 833, a 840 

Mercantile Wharf, c S33 
Salaries of members of City Government, c 834, a 840 
Standing Committees Board of Aldermen, 856 
Union R.R. Co. — 

Hearing on running to Temple place, a 195 
Petition for track in Merrimac street, a 644 
Removal of tow-horses from South Uussell street, a 647 

Viles, Alderman — remarks : 

N. W. Day's omnibus route, 80 

Management of sinking funds, 85 

Tracks on Columbus ave. , 157 

Jury List, 176 

Care of truants, 201 

Appropriation Bill, 248 

Fruit-stands in streets, 263 

Salary of Inspector of Provisions, 285, 337 

Sealers of Weights and Mea.^ures, 300, 426, 457, 510 

Registrar of Voters, 316, 351 

Wales-street drainage, 379 

Police for bath-houses, 380 

Asphalt pavement, 395 

Poland and Pe;i body's omnibus line, 401 

Free Ferries, 487 

Police Sergeant Clark, 493 

Public Parks, 475 

Commercial-street widening, 508, 558, 631 

Improved Sewerage, 678 

Printing at Deer Island, 586 

Constables, 609, 626 

Rejection of policeman, 613 

Paving Richmond street, 615 

Removal of horses from South Russell street, 647 

East Boston High School , 649 

Refreshments, etc., 682 



XVI II 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Stone-cutting at Deer Island, 698 
Vegetable market, 717 
Metropolitan Railroad, 730, 837 
Roxbury Canal, 727, 759, 764, 784 
Public Lands, 762 

Forfeiture of land on Washington sq.,762 
Small Pox Hospital, 781 
Nuisance in Charlestown, 788, 796 

Metropolitan Horse Railroad location in Washington St., 823 
Claim of John Raddiu, 825 
Vose, Ward 24 — remarks : 

Salaries and duties of city officers, 38, 167 

Visit to the Parks, 315 

Salary of Clerks in Fire Commissioners' Office, 409 

Visit to Sudbury river, 409, 430 

Personal explanations, 430 

Sale of Atherton School building, 513 

W&rds ""• 

Ward-room for Ward 24, c 357, 383, a 389, 659, 700, 732, 734 

Ward 2, resignation of Inspector, a 391 

Ward 22, ward-room accommodations, referred, c 410 
Washington's Birthday — 

Order passed to commemorate, c 37, 48, a 54 
Water — 

Contract for pipe authorized, a 56, 71, c 72 

Water Board authorized to designate number of employes and 
fix salaries, c 236, a 238 

Report on high service in theatres, c 274, a 277 

Mystic Valley Sewer, order for construction, passed, a 297, 
c 308, 324 ; employing citizens as laborers, referred, c 329 
a 337 ; resolve and order passed, a 392, c 404 ; non-concur- 
rence, a 424 ; adherence, c 427, a 434 ; reconsideration, a 
457, c 460 ; communication from City Council of Somerville 
laid on table, a 472 ; order passed, c 480, a 490 ; report on 
legality, c 504 ; report from Water Board, orders passed to 
take land, c 550 ; reconsideration refused, c 550, a 551 ; 
communication from Woburn referred to Water Board, a 
585 ; deduction of wages referred, c 623, a 627 

Visit to Sudbury river, order rejected, c 357, 409 ; orders passed, 
c 430, 440, a 456, 477, c 480, a 490 

Boston Water Board, first annual report, a 509 

$20,000 for pumping engine, a 598, c 603, a 611, c 622, a 627 

$27,000 for second line force main-pipe, Mystic, a 598, c 603, 
622, a 627 
Webster, Ward 3 — remarks : 

Retrenchment in expenditures, 14 

Badges, 15, 25 

Salaries and duties of city officers, 37, 40, 164, 185 

Abolition of Assistant Assessors, 73 

Mechanics' Fair and the Common, 126 

Contingent Fund, 142 

Use of City Hall Elevator, 143 

Pensions for police, 158 

System of valuation, 207 

Sinking Funds, 219 

Appropriation Bill, 232 

Mr. Keith's appointment to the Board of Health, 256, 272, 294 
, Public Parks, 271 

Fourth of July, 273 

Acceptance of Mercantile Library, 274, 292 

Joint Rules and Orders, 289 

Board of Health, 295 

Mystic Valley Sewer, 309, 330, 404, 427 

Ventilation of Council Chamber, 313 

Visit to the parks, 315 

License Commissioners, 315, 328, 651 

Contracts only to tax-payers, 333 

Oushing's Manual for members, 356 

Civilities to distinguished strangers, 357 

Official report, 360 

Salary Superintendent of Dover-street bridge, 403 

Salary of clerks in Fire Commissioners' office, 408 

Duties of Retrenchment Committee, 410, 429 

Personal explanation, 430 

Inspection of Buildings, 446 

Salaries of employes of Water Board, 467 

Public Parks, 481 

Free Ferries, 514 

Sealers of Weights and Measures, 513, 546 

Improved Sewerage, 530, 564 

Refreshments, etc., 532 

Salary of clerk of ferries, 550 

Inspection of Lime, 603 

Police boat " Protector", 637 

School sessions, 637 

Investigation of Department of Common, etc., c 656, 673, 813 

Refreshment bills, etc., 676, 743 

Investigation of Fire Commissioners, 678 

Appointment of Inspector of Buildings, 721, 734 

Surveyors of Highways, 816 

Public Parks, 818 

Curbstone fruit-venders, 828, 846 
Weights and Measures — see also Salaries, 

Annual report, a 30 

Report ana orders referred, a 301, c 308 ; report, a 364 

Discussion on petition for appointment of Daniel 0. Hunt, 
a 426 ; indefinitely postponed, a 436 



Wilbur, Ward 20 — remarks : 

Uniform system of valuation, 48 

Labor for poor citizens, 61 

Abolition of Assistant Assessors, 72, 95 

Boards and commissions, 75 

Sinking Funds, 119 

Bills for furnishing supplies, 118 

Mechanics' Fair and the Common, 125 138 

Use of City Hall Elevator, 143 

Salaries, 163, 189 

Second Assistant Assessors, 158, 254 

System of valuation, 207 

Appropriation Bill, 230, 254 

Dorchester School -house windows, 255 

Mr. Keith's appointment to Board of Health, 272, 294 

License Commissioners, 287, 353 

Ventilation of Council Chamber, 312, 440 

Vacation Schools, 324 

Horatio Harris estate for park, 325 

Mystic Valley Sewer, 329, 404 

Contracts only to tax-payers, 332, 355 

Civilities to distinguished strangers, 358 

Official report, 360 

Cause of fire corner Shawmut avenue and Pleasant street, 407 

Salary of clerks in Fire Commissioners' office, 409 

Visit to Sudbury river, 430, 440 

Army and Navy Monument, 441 

Public Parks, 478, 481 

Inspection of Buildings, 447 

Free Ferries, 496 

Sale of Atherton School building, 513 

Improved Sewerage, 530 

Vacations for firemen, 541 

Occupancy of streets for building, 547 

Investigation of Fire Commissioners, 677 

Hiring rooms in Pemberton square, 669 

Appointment of Inspector of Buildings, 720 

Stone cutting business at the Islands, 748 

Small Pox Hospital, 776 
Wilder, Alderman — remarks: 

Abatement of claim against a bankrupt, 62 

Election of Assessors, 56, 179 

Appointments of special police at Boston and Maine R. R., 72 

Consolidation of City Registrar and Board of Health, 86 

Exhibition on Common, 112, 131 

Tracks on Columbus ave. , 155, 172 

Confirming nominations of city officers, 197 

Play-ground on Common, 212 

Fruit-stands in streets, 239, 264 

East Boston Ferries, 260 

Salary of Inspector of Provisions, 285, 819, 335 

Sealers of Weights and Measures, 297, 426, 437, 457, 510 

Equitable valuation of property, 805 

Vacant stores and tenements, 307 

Wales-street drainage, 379 

Public Parks, 349, 367, 416 

Poland & Peabody's Omnibus Line, 398 

Mystic Valley Sewer, 424 

Asphalt pavement, 456 

Vacation of firemen, 507 

Proposed visit of Governors, 537 

Horse-cars blockades, 538 

Occupation of streets for building, 554 

Improved Sewerage, 575 

Inspection of Lime, 598 

Blackstone-square accident, 609, 666 

Refreshments, etc., 684 

South Boston Railroad location, 698 

Ward room in Ward 24, 700 

Vegetable Market, 717 

Metropolitan Railroad, 731, 837 

Roxbury Canal, 784 

Nuisance in Charlestown, 788 

Congress-st. widening, 854 
Wolcott, Ward 11 — remarks : 

Salaries, 165, 193, 828 

Preservation of Old South, 194 

Vacation Schools, 382, 460 

Repairs on Adams School-house, 466 

Free Ferries, 515 

Condition of School-houses, 780 

Historical sites, 789 

Annual dinner of Council, 815 

Rovbury Canal, 831 

FINAL PROCEEDINGS. 

Common Council. 
Thanks to the President, 850 
Response of the President, 850 
Copy of the President's address requested, 852 
Adjournment sine die, 852 

Board of Aldermen. 
Thanks to the Mayor, 856 
Valedictory address of the Mayor, 857 
Thanks to the Chairman, 861 
The Chairman's address, 862 
Order for printing final proceedings, 863 
Adjournment sine die, 863 



CITY Q-OVERNMENT. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Organization of the Grovemment, 

JANUARY 1, 1877. 



The members elect of the Board of Aldermen 
met in their chamber and wei-e called to order at 
10.15 o'clock by the City Clerk. 

The Mayor elect, his Honor Frederic O. Prince, 
entered the chamber and took the chair. He was 
accompanied by Chief Justice Gray and Rev. S. 
K. Lothrop, D. B., who took seats on his right and 
left. 

A message was received from the Common 
Council that a quorum of that body was present 
and ready to be qualified. The Mayor and Alder- 
man elect and the City Clerk proceeded to the 
Council chamber in charge of the City Messenger. 

The members elect of the Common Council were 
called to order at ten minutes past ten o'clock A. 
M., by Mr. Benjamin Pope of Ward 15, the senior 
member. 

On motion of Mr. Wilbur of Ward 20, Messrs. 
Smardon or Ward 10, Wilbur of Ward 20, Spence- 
ley of Ward 19, Felt of Ward 18 and Fraser of 
Ward 6 were appointed a committee to collect cre- 
dentials, which duty they performed, and report- 
ed that sixty-eight members elect, constituting a 
quorum, were present. 

On motion of Mr. Howes of Ward 18, it was or- 
dered, that a committee be appointed to inform 
the Mayor and Aldermen elect that a quorum of 
the Common Council were present and ready to be 
qualified. Mr. Howes was appointed said com- 
mittee, and in a few minutes he returned and re- 
ported that he had performed the duty and that 
the Mayor and Aldermen elect would forthwith 
attend for the purpose of qualifying the mem- 
bers. 

The Mayor and Aldermen elect entered the 
Council Chamber and took seats. 

Prayer was offered by Rev. S. K. Lothrop, D. D. 

Chief Justice Gray administered the usual oaths 
of office to his Honor Mayor Prince. The names 
of the Aldermen and Common Councilmen elect 
were called by the Clerk, and the usual oaths of 
office were respectively administered to them by 
his Honor the Mayor. 

The Mayor then delivered his inaugural address, 
at the conclusion of which th^. Mayor and Alder- 
men retired from the Council Chamber. 



Soard of Aldernien. 



The Aldermen returned to their chamber and 
were called to order by the Mayor, who took the 
chair. 

Alderman Viles moved that the Board proceed 
to the election of chairman. 

Alderman Robinson— Mr. Mayor and Gentlemen 
oi the Board : I am extremely sorry that the first 
remarks I am called upon to make in the Board, 
upon a question of conscience, should be some- 
what of an unpleasant character. It is well known 
— because the newspapers have published it — that 
there was a caucus of all the members of the pres- 
ent Board held in the adjoining room on Saturday. 
At that caucus one member of the old 
Board made a motion, Afhich was second- 
ed by another member of the old Board, 
that a third member of the old Board should 
be nominated for the position of Chairman of this 
Board. Although there was some little feeling 
shown in the matter then, there was no time to 
enter into an extended discussion ; bat it placed 
not only the gentleman nominated, but us all, in 
a very embarrassing position. Nothing had been 
said to us in regard to who should be nominated; 
the thing was brought up suddenly ; it was within 
a few minutes of the hour for the final meeting 
of the old Board, and there was no time to talk 
about it. Everybody seemed abashed, and there 
were some, besides myself, who thought that some- 
thing ought to have been said before the nomina- 
tion was made. The time was short, and it was 
necessary to finish up the business in time for the 
meeting of the old Board; so the thing was rush- 
ed through and passed, which amounted to the 
same thing as a unanimous informal vote— if such 
a thing could be. It was not my intention to have 
anything of a partisan character here ; but having 
received a nomination from the successful party, 



without any efforts on my part, I feel under obli- 
gations to express my obligations to them, espe- 
cially in a matter which does not affect the inter- 
ests of the city. By voting for a member of that 
party for Chairman, it was the only way that 1 
had of expressing my obligations to that party for 
my nomination. The action taken on Saturday is 
just the same as if the Democratic House of Rep- 
resentatives of the United States, when they met 
in caucus a year ago last December, had, in con- 
sequence of the ability of Mr. James G. Blaine as 
a good presiding officer, voted for him to be speak- 
er. Nothing that I say is of a personal character 
in regard to Mr. Clark, in any way, shape or man- 
ner, for he is a strong personal friend of mine. I 
have only acted in this way from conscientious 
feelings toward the party which put me in nomina- 
tion. 

Alderman O'Brien— I regret, Mr. Mayor, that the 
Alderman from the Dorchester District, [Alder- 
man Robinson] has felt it necessary to open this 
discussion. I supposed that the matter was settled 
at the informal meeting of the new Board on Sat- 
urday last, as there was the time and place for 
this discussion, especially as at that meeting it 
was voted to make the nomination unanimous. 
Since I have been a member of the Board, some 
two years, an informal meeting has always been 
called a few days before the beginning of a new 
year, to nominate a chairman and a Committee on 
Accounts. The election of a Committee on Ac- 
counts is necessary at an early day, in fact one 
of our first acts, in order to transact 
the business of the city. There was, then, 
nothing unusual in our meeting on Satur- 
day, and I have never known an instance 
where there was any understanding what should 
be done at that meeting, so far as the chairman- 
ship of the Board was concerned, or as to who 
should fill positions on the Committee on Ac- 
counts. I never said one word about the matter 
previous to that meeting to the gentleman nomi- 
nated f Aldermen Clark], and have had no under- 
standing with any one in relation to the chairman- 
jhip, although at all times free to express my hon- 
est convictions. At that meeting I called atten- 
tion to the fact that for two years I had 
been impressed with the prompt, faith- 
ful, able and impartial manner the Chairman 
had discharged his duties. 1 could not do 
less under the circumstances, for in boards 
largely Republican he has been impartial beyond 
all question, and moved that for such distin- 
guished services that Alderman Clark be nomi- 
nated by acclamation as our next Chairman. I 
considered this a graceful compliment from a 
Board constituted as ours will be the coming year, 
so largely Democratic, and that it would do much 
to silence forever the partisan cry that was raised 
previous to the election. The informal ballot on 
Saturday resulted in eight votes for Alderman 
Clark and four votes for all others, and 
then the nomination was made unani- 
mous. I regret that there is any misunder- 
standing about it. There has been con- 
siderable outside pressure to change the current 
since Saturday, and for my part I consider it a 
duty never to give way to such a pressure, when 
I feel that I am right. In voting for Alderman 
Clark on Saturday I feel that I was right. It was 
honoring faithful and impartial services, and I 
am ready to ratify the act today. Before the 
election the "Prince ticket" was denounced as 
extremely partisan by nearly the entire press of 
the city. The election of that ticket, it was 
said, would bring about such an adminis- 
tration in this city as Tweed's in New 
York, and misrule such as has made 
Philadelphia almost bankrupt. I wish em- 
phatically to contradict such comparisons, and in 
starting on our new departure by the reelection 
of Alderman Clark to show that we are not such a 
partisan aoministration as was represented, to 
show that nine Democratic members are not so 
exclusively partisan and can do a graceful act. 

The position has no political significance. It is 
an honor in being elected to preside over the 
Board, but it is an office of essentially hard work, 
and I know of no member of the present Board 
who could so ably and so promptly discharge the 
duties as the Alderman who has so faithfully filled 
the position the past three years. It has 
also been currently reported that if Mayor 
Prince accepts a foreign mission, or if he 
should happen to die during the year, that our 
Chairman takes his place. There is no foundation 
whatever for this report. The city charter, sec- 
tion 50, expressly provides that "in case of the de- 



2 



BOAK.IJ OF^ AJLiDER^JVLEN 



cease, inability, absence or resignation of the 
Mayor, and whenever there is a vacancy in the 
office from any cause, and the same being de- 
clared, and a vote passed by the Aldermen and 
Common Co'incil respectively declaring sucli 
cause, and the expediency of electing a Mayor for 
the time being to supply the vacancy thus 
occasioned, the Board of Aldermen shall 
issue their warrants in due form for the 
election of Mayor," etc. It will be seen 
that the election of Mayor, in case of vacancy, is 
under the control of th-j City Council, and that the 
election cf Chairman of the Board has nothing to 
do with it. 1 hope the Board will ratify the ac- 
tion of the informal meeting, and elect Alderman 
Clark to ttU the position he has so ably filled dur- 
ing the past three years. 

Alderman Fitzgerald— Mr. Mayor, I was, present 
last Saturday at an informal gathering of the 
members of the Board of Aldermen, and I gave a 
very full expression of my feelings with regard to 
the person who should be the presiding officer of 
this Board. In municipal matters I am no 
partisan and do not propose to toe. I have 
made more enemies among my Democratic 
friends during the two years I have served 
as a member of the City Government, than 
I have in any other political party, and 1 
presume I shall make more during my term of of- 
fice here. I said last Saturday that 1 was under 
the impression and believed that the presiding 
officer of this Board, considering the circum- 
stances under which you, sir, were elected, should 
be fully in accord with you politically. I said that 
the Mayor of Boston this year was elected on a 
purely partisan ticket. He is recognized as a 
Democratic Mayor. The Mayors who have pre- 
ceded him, whether they have been Democrats or 
Republicans, have acknowledged that they were 
elected by citizens and were not party men. 
But you, sir, are a purely party Mayor. I think it 
is but proper and just that the person who repre- 
sents you, as the presiding officer of this Board, 
shoulil beof the same political stripe as you. 1 
take this Mew, not because tbe Democrats have a 
maiority of the Board of Aldermen, but because 
the Mayor is essentially a Democrat, and his rep- 
resentative should also be of that stripe. 
The gentleman [.Uderman O'Brien] said it 
was charged that our Government, under 
Democratic rule, would be Uke that of New York 
under Tweed, or that of Philadelphia at the 
uresent time; and that while it would show to the 
people a disposition to be liberal, it would also be 
an act of magnanimitv on our part to elect a Re- 
publican as presiding' officer. Now I fail to see 
that such action will disprove any charge or that 
kind. For myself I should take no notice 
of it: no matter which man is elected, 
whether he be a Democrat or Republican, it 
will make very little difference so far as 
making this a pure or a corrupt government; 
therefore his argument simply amounts to noth- 
ing. I am sorry that this matter comes up in this 
shape, but as it comes up for argument before the 
Board I feel that it is a duty I owe to myself and 
to this Board to give an expression of my opinion 
on this question. I entertain the highest re- 
spect and regard for Alderman Clark and 
under any other circumstances, even if a 
maiority of this Board were Democrats, I 
should vote for him. But, sir, considering the 
circumstances under which you have been elected, 
I cannot vote for any perscm who has not the 
same political ideas and is not fully in accord with 
yourself politically. 

Alderman Robinson— The gentleman [Alderman 
O'Brien] seems to convey the idea that something 
of a personal character was intended by my re- 
marks. There is nothing personal in it; but I will 
repeat again, that I feel that in this thing it is the 
only chance I have to express my obligations to 
the party which nominated me for the position. 
1 felt obliged to do so, and it had no connec- 
tion of a personal character whatever ; and in the 
remarks I made I intended no reference to the 
ability of Mr. Clark. After saying what we have 
1 believe we should let the whole thing rest. 

Alderman O'Brien : Mr. Mayor— There is noth- 
ing unusual in the election of a chairman of dif- 
ferent political sentiments from the majority of 
the Board. When Mayor Pierce, a Republican, 
was elected, Alderman Cutter, one of "he most de- 
cided Democrats of the Board, was elected to hll 
tbe position oE Chairman, and he was acting 
Mayor for a sboit time, after Mayor Pierce 
resigned to go to Coniiress. This was 
done by a Republican Board of Aldermen, 



and Alderman Clark was the chief mover in the 
matter. Since I have been a member of the 
Board the Democrats have voted as willingly 
for our Chairman as the Republicans, and if it is 
wrong now it was also wrong then. For three 
years the Republicans have elected a Democratic 
Mayor, and extreme partisanship has seldom been 
heard in City Councils. Other precedents might 
be named where party lines have been ignored, 
and I cannot see the great wrong that is done by 
reelecting our worthy Chairman. On the contrary, 
I contend that it is a graceful act that will tend to 
place the new administration in the right posi- 
tion. 

Alderman Slade — I was surprised at the action 
of the caucus. The nomination of Chairman was 
made and advocated by Democrats and on the in- 
formal ballots all the votes but three — one of 
which I cast — were for Mr. Clark. As the nomina- 
tion was made in a caucus of the full Board I feel 
bound to abide by it. 
A ballot was ordered and resulted as follows: 

Whole number of votes 8 

Necessary for a choice 5 

John T. Clark had 8 

Blanks 2 

Alderman Clark took the chair and said- 
Gentlemen of the Board of Aldermen— I thank 
you for the honor you have done me in electing 
me to preside over your deliberations for the com- 
ing year. I accept the office, and will endeavor to 
discharge the duties acceptably and impartially, 
confidently relying upon sympathy and coopera- 
tion. Gentlemen, we are called upon to discharge 
duties of gre.it responsildlity. The welfare ot the 
community is in a measure intrusted to us. Let 
us ever keep in view the fact that we are here as 
representatives of a. city noted tor its wise and 
beueticent legislation, and that it is our duty 
to guard the reputation which has come 
down to us through the historic years 
which have marked the progress of Boston. 
Let us emulate our pi-edecessors in whatever is 
wise, whatever is good, whatever is for the wel- 
fare of the community, that we may leave for our- 
selves a record which will compare favorably with 
theirs, and, that we may perpetuate a government 
which haS been and will continue to be a model 
for other municipalities. 

Again thanking you, gentlemen, and wishing 
you a happy New Year, I await your pleasure. 

Alderman Robinson presented the petition of 
George E. Bullard, Augustus Parker, Coolidge 
Barnard, James H. Means, William Pope and 49 
others, that Geneva^enue be extended westward 
to Marston avenue fSrGrove Hall, and eastward to 
the junction of Dorchester avenue and Park 
street, Dorchester; and that Geneva avenue and 
Olney street be put in suitable order for public 
travel, especially at the railroad bridge. Referred 
to Street Commissioners. 

On motion of Alderman Viles, a message was 
sent to the Common Council informing them of 
the organization of the Board, and a message was 
received that the Council had organized and was 
ready to proceed to business. 

On motion of Alderman Thompson, a message 
was sent to the Common Council proposing a joint 
convention for the choice of a City Clerk. Subse- 
quently a message was received that the Council 
had concurred; and the Mayor and Aldermen pro- 
ceeded to the Council chamber. 

On returning from the joint convention Alder- 
man Clark took the chair. 

Alderman O'Brien offered an order. That the 
several beads of departments and boards of direc- 
tion of the various institutions be authorized to 
submit their annual reports in print, under the 
direction of the Superintendent of Printing. Read 
twice and passed. Sent down. 

Alderman O'Brien offered an order. That one 
hundred additional copies of proceedings of the 
City Council for 1877 be printed. Read twice and 
passed. Sent down. 

On motion of Alderman Slade it was ordered, 
That until otherwise ordered. Monday, at four 
o'clock P. M., be assigned as the day and hour for 
holding the regular meetings of the Board. 

Alderman O'Brien offered an order. That a joint 
special committee, to consist of three members of 
the Board of Aldermen, with such as the Common 
Council may join, be appointed to determine and 
pay the allowances of State aid to the families of 
disabled soldiers and the families of the slain, pur- 
suant to the existing acts of the Legislature; and 
that said committee have power to employ a pay- 
master and such clerical assistance as may be re- 
quired for that purpose, and that the expense be 



JANUARY 1, 1877 



o 



charged to the appropriation for Soldiers' Relief. 
Read twice and passed, and Aldermen O'Brien, 
Slade and Wilder were appointed on said commit- 
tee. Sent dcwn. 

Alderman Thompson offered an order that the 
joint rules and orders of the City Council of the 
year 1876 be adopted as the joint rules and orders 
of the present City Council until otherwise order- 
ed, and that Aldermen , with such as the 

Common Council may join, be a committee to ex- 
amine and report if any alterations are needed 
therein. Read twice and passed, and Aldermen 
Thompson and Burnham were appointed on said 
committee. Sent down. 

On motion of Alderman Viles, it was ordered 
that the rules and orders of the Board of Alder- 
men for 1876 be adopted as the rules and orders 
of the Board until otherwise ordered; and Alder- 
men Allies and Fitzgerald were appointed a com- 
mittee to report if any changes are needed 
therein. 

On motion of Alderman O'Brien, the Board ad- 
journed. 



Common Council. 

After the Mayor and Aldermen retired from the 
Council Chamber Mr. Beeching of "Ward 1 was 
called to the chair. On motion of Mr. Sampson of 
Ward 17, an election for President was ordered. 
Messrs. Sampson of Ward 17, Shepard of Ward 4 
and Thorndike of Ward 2 were appointed a com- 
mittee to collect and count votes. They reiJorted 
as follows : 

Whole number of votes 69 

Necessary for choice 35 

Benjamin Pope of Ward 15 had 68 

J.J. Flynn 1 

And Mr. Pope was declared elected. 

Messrs. Sampson of Ward 17 and Flynn of 
Ward 13 were appointed a committee to conduct 
the President elect to the chair, which they did. 
The President was introduced to the Council by 
Mr. Beeching. He took the chair and said- 
Gentlemen of the Common Council— Permit me 
to return to you my sincere thanks for the distin- 
guished honor which you have now conferred upon 
me in elevating me to this position of trust and re- 
sponsibility. When I consider the very acceiitable 
service which has been rendered by the able, 
faithful and competent gentlemen who have occu- 
pied this chair, and of wliom you have made me 
the successor; that you have selected me, when 
there are those among you whose experience, 
whose ability could afford you promise of better 
results than I can give; and when I consider the 
spontaneous manner in which your choice has 
been made so unanimous, and this without any so- 
licitation or expectation on my part, I feel that 
you have given expression to a generous confi- 
dence that claims the exercise of the best powers 
that I possess and that I can bring to the discharge 
of the duties of this important olfice. In accepting 
this position I cannot disguise the fact that I en- 
tertain such a distrust of my own ability that I 
must invoke all the indulgence for any errois of 
judgment that I must inevitably commit, and all 
the aid and cooperation that I can claim from the 
friendship of which you have given me sach un- 
mistakable evidence. We are this day engaged in 
inaugurating a new City Government. We are 
entering upon the discharge of important and 
honorable public duties with which we have been 
intrusted by our fellow citizens. 

The city of Boston, notwithstanding the calam- 
ity of the great tire, and the period of severe 
business depression through which we are now 
passing, maintains, and is likely to maintain, its 
position among the great cities of the world. 
Within a few years it has made a large increase 
in population and in territory, calling for addi- 
tional provisions for the safety, the comfort and 
convenience of its inhabitants, and imposing- 
greater duties and heavier responsibilities upon 
those who are chosen to manage its affairs. 

It is to he presumed that none of us have sought 
position here ior the purpose of jsromoting per- 
sonal or political interests, of advocating sectional 
projects in which the whole city does not share 
the benefit, or that we have any aim in view, 
which is not consistent with the public good. 
Some of us have had one or two years, a 
few a longer experience in this branch of 
the City Government, while nearly two-thirds 
of us come here for the first time. Tlie 
short time of service which this indicates, 
is thought by many reflecting minds to be 



a defect in our municipal system. It is enough to 
signify to us, that in order to become so familiar 
with the affairs of the city in all their magnitude, 
as to be able wisely and intelligently to pass judg- 
ment upon the different measures which wUl 
come before us for our decision, we must devote 
all the time, thought and attention which we can 
spare from our private business. Among the 
most important matters which are likely to be 
brought before us in the early portion of this year, 
are the projects of public parks and an improved 
system of sewerage, reported by the commission- 
ers appointed to investigate those subjects, and 
which. If carried out, will involve the expendi- 
ture of several millions of dollars. These are 
great questions, and realized as such, most vivid- 
ly, by the members of the last City Government, 
and although earnestly considered by them, some 
of the most conscientious and judicious minds 
among them could not be said to have obtained 
such a definite knowledge of these projects as to 
enable them to come to a decision. It was 
therefore wisely determined to defer action 
until further information could be procured. 
The report of the committee to consult 
with the Park Commissioners was brought in 
during the closing hours of the last Citv Govern- 
ment, and was referred to us for our consider- 
ati<m. The investigations and surveys for the 
proposed improved system of sewerage is in an 
advanced stage and may soon be expected to be 
reported upon. I have taken the liberty of men- 
tioning these subjects at this time, partly for the 
purpose of illustrating the fact that the Common 
Council, which many have the disposition to dis- 
parage, really has great and important interests in 
its charge, and partly to call your especial atten- 
tion to them, because it will be iiupos.sible lor any 
member to-give an intelligejct :ind unprejudiced 
vote upon them, unless by previous preparation 
he has fully qualified hims^elt so to do by examin- 
ing the reports and debates which have already 
been published upon parks and improved sewer- 
age. 

One of the most desirable objects to be accom- 
plished, and upon which the tax payers dis- 
play the greatest anxiety, is a judicious 
economy in the use of the public money. 
It can hardly be considered economy, how- 
ever, to neglect or to postpone projects 
of absolute necessity, merely because of the stag- 
nation of business. It would rather seem, that 
such a peiiod when money, material and labor are 
cheap, when so many of our fellow citizens stand 
in need of a market for these commodities, es- 
p3ciany those who have nothing but their labor 
to dispose of, is the very time to enter upon neces- 
sary public works of permanent utility. 

Among the projected enterprises which those 
best acquainted with the necessity existing for 
them have refrained from pressing upon the at- 
tention of the City Council in deference to the 
great sensitiveness of the public mind in regard 
to the expenditure of money, are the extension of 
the Public Library Building on Boylston street, 
ana also proper accommodations for the English 
High and Public Latin schools. These are men- 
tioned because they happen to have come some- 
what within the sphere of my own observation, 
and have served to convince me that there is a 
medium between parsimonious economy and ex- 
travagance which it is wise for us to follow. 

We are expected .by our fellow citizens in the 
discharge of our duties as public servants to exer- 
cise the same wisdom, the same vigilance, the 
same regard to economy with which we would 
manage our own private affairs. They hold us, in 
common with the Board of Aldermen, responsible 
for the measures whicli are passed by the City 
Government; but it will be remembered that there 
are several important departments in which this 
Common Council, through its committees, has no 
control whatever in regard to the details of expen- 
diture, although those details amount to an enor- 
mous sum in the aggregate. Among the more im- 
portant of these may be mentioned the public 
schools, bridges, paving and county matters. 

The general appropriation bill comes before you 
early in the year, being reported to the Council by 
the Joint Standing Committee on Finance, and is 
based upon estimates furnished by the different 
departments. 

It should come before us at as early a period as 
possible, in order that ample time maj' be afford- 
ed to each member of the Council to obtain such 
information as he may require to be able to vote 
intelligently upon its merits. There is no expen- 
diture of money, however large or small, embraced 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



in this bill, that is not a legitimate subject of in- 
quiry by each member of this Common Council. 
The heads of departments and the committees of 
the Council will always be ready to give any ex- 
planations that will be called for upon the matters 
which they have in charge, so that members can 
hold every item of proposed expenditure within 
their control until the appropriation bill is passed. 
When reported, it will be found desirable to con- 
sider it without unnecessary delay, rather than to 
postpone it from time to time, till we arrive so 
near the close of the financial year, that impera- 
tive necessity will compel us to dispose of it with- 
out the careful deliberation which its importance 
demands. 

Gentlemen who enter for the first time upon 
the duties which devolve upon them here will rec- 
ognize the propriety of calling their attention to 
this subject, because upon the care with which 
they scrutinize this bill depends in a large degree 
the reputation which they may hope to gain as 
wise economists. 

In conclusion, gentlemen, let me express the 
hope that our deliberations through the year 
which has so auspiciously begun may always lead 
us to the wisest conclusions; that they may be so 
harmonious, that notwithstanding the differences 
of opinion which will very properly arise on the 
questions which will come before us, that the close 
of the year will find us undisturbed by any unpleas- 
ant recollections, and that it will be remembered 
in after life for the lasting friendships which we 
have formed. Let us remember that so far as we 
propose to become faithful servants and repre- 
sentatives of the people we will find here ample 
scope for all the work we may feel disposed to do 
in their behalf, and just so far we will gain the 
self-satisfaction consequent upon duly well per- 
formed and the gratitude of our constituents, 
which is all the honor and recompense that we 
can hope for. 

On motion of Mr. Clarke of AVard 22, an elec- 
tion for clerk of the Common Council was ordered. 
Committee— Messrs. Clarke of Ward 22, Fraser of 
Ward 6 and Barnard of Ward 24. They reported- 
Whole number of votes 71 

Necessary tor a choice 36 

Washington P. Gregg had 71 

Mr. Gregg was declared unanimously elected. 
The oath of oflice was administered to him by 
Joim P. Healy, City Solicitor, and he assumed his 
position. 

On motion of Mr. Richardson of Ward 11 an or- 
der was passed, and that gentleman was appoint- 
ed a committee, to inform the Board of Aldermen 
that the Council was organized and ready to pro- 
ceed to business. He performed that duty and re- 
Dorted accordingly. 

Mr. Stone of Ward 3 offered an order, That until 
otherwise ordered the rules and orders of the 
Common Council of 1876 be adopted as the rules 
and orders of this Council. Read twice and 
passed. 

Messages were received from the Board of Al- 
dermen that they had organized, a,nd proposing a 
joint convention for the election of a City Clerk. 
The Council concurred in the request. 

Mr. Duggan of Ward 12 offered an order. 
That the Municipal Register be printed under 
the direction of the JointCoramittee on Rules and 
Orders, who may employ such assistance as may 
be deemed advisable ; and that they also prepare 
a pocket edition of the rules and a list of members 
and committees. Read twice and passed. Sent 
up. 

Mr. Stone of Ward 3 offered an order for the ap- 
pointment of a Standing Committee of the Coun- 
cil on Elections. Read twice and passed, and 
Messrs. Felt of Ward 18, Stone of Ward 3, Samp- 
son of Ward 17, Souther of Ward 14, and McGar- 
rigle of Ward 8, were appointed said committee. 

Mr. Smardon of Ward 10 offered an order. That 
Thursday next at 8 P. M. be assigned as the time 
for the election, on the part of the Council, of a 
Standing Committee on Finance. Read twice and 
passed, and Messrs. Flynn of Ward 13, Howes of 
Ward 18 and Pierce of Ward 24 were appointed a 
committee to make nominations. 

JOINT CONVENTION. 

The Mayor and Aldermen entered the Council 
Chamber and a joint convention was held. An 
election for City Clerk was ordered; Committee- 
Alderman Fitzgerald and Councilmen Richard 



Pope of Ward 14 and Wilbur of Ward 20. They 
reported — 

Whole number of votes 81 

Necessary for a choice 41 

Samuel F. McCleary had 79 

George A. Shaw 1 

John T. Priest 1 

Mr. McCleary was declared elected, and the oath 
of office was administered to him by the Mayor. 
The convention then dissolved. 

COMMON COUNCIL RESUMED. 

On motion of Mr. Spencelev of Ward 19, an order 
was passed that when the Council adjourn it be to 
Thursday next at 7i/4 P. M., and that that be the 
day and hour for tne regular meetings of the 
Council, until otherwise ordered. Passed. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 9 offered an order for the 
joint standing committee, when appointed, to re- 
isume the unfinished business appropriate to them 
referred from the last City Council. Read twice 
and passed. Sent up. 

Mr. Ham of Ward 14 offered an order. That the 
joint rules and orders of the City Council of 1876 
be adopted as the joint rules and orders for the 
government of the present City Council until oth- 
erwise ordered. Read twice and passed. Sent up. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17 offered an order tor 
the appointment of joint special committees to 
nominate suitable persons as candidates for the 
various city offices elected by the City Council. 

Mr. Sampson— That is rather an unusual order, 
and it is perhaps as well that I should explain 
why it has been introduced. It is for the purpose 
of facilitating business, as all gentlemen who have 
served here before will appreciate, and to give the 
President of the Council time to deliberate In 
making up the nominating, as well as the joint 
standing committees. I hope it will meet the ap- 
proval of the Council. 

The order was read twice and passed. Sent up. 

Mr. Fraser of Ward 6 offered an order, That the 
heads of departments and boards of direction be 
requested to submit their annual reports in print, 
under the direction of the Superintendent of 
Printing. Read twice and passed. Sent up. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 13 offered an order for the 
appointment of a joint special committee to re- 
port what disposition should be made of the topics 
in the Mayor's address. Read twice and passed, 
and Messrs. Flynn of Ward 13, Pierce of Ward 18, 
and Fernald of Ward 15 were appointed on said 
committee. Sent up. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 11 offered an order. 
That his Honor the Mayor be requested to furnish 
a copy of his address, and that the same be print- 
ed. Read twice and passed. Sent up. 

An order came from the other branch for the 
adoption of the joint rules and orders of 1876 until 
otherwise ordered, and appointing a joint commit- 
tee (with Aldermen Thompson and Burnham) to 
report what alterations are needed. Amended, on 
motion of Mr. Howes of Ward 18, by striking out 
the part adopting the rules of 1876, and passed. 
Messrs. Sibley of Ward 5, Pratt of Ward 21, and 
Upliam of Ward 20 were appointed on said com- 
mittee. Sent up. 

Petitions for recounts of votes for Common 
Councilmen were received as follows ; Of George 
F. Doyle et al., Ward 3; Samuel G. Stone et al., 
Ward 4; C. Blanchard et al.. Ward 6; Peter Allen 
et al. and Charles L. Storrs et «t.. Ward 15; George 
E. Filkins et al.. Ward 16; James Teevan et al.. 
Ward 19; Fred H. Bisch et al. and John E. Ward 
etal.. Ward 20. Mr. Kelley of Ward 3 presented 
a petition from George Flanigan for recount in 
Ward 4. Severally referred to Committee on 
Elections. 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 5 offered 'an order that 
Thursday next at 8.15 P. M. be assigned as the 
time for the election on the part of the Council of 
a Standing Committee on Accounts. Read twice 
and passed, and Messrs. Sibley of Ward 5, Samp- 
son of Ward 17 and Pope of Ward 14 were appoint- 
ed a committee to nominate candidates. Mr. 
Flynn of Ward 13 stated that he had served on the 
Committee on Accounts several years, and as a 
renominatlon was customary in such cases, he re- 
quested the committee not to nominate him. 

On motion of Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19, the 
Council proceeded to draw for seats, after which 
a recess of ten minutes was taken. 

Adjourned, on motion of Mr. Howes of Ward 18, 
and stood adjourned to Thursday evening next, at 
71/2 P. M. 



COMMON OOXJNOIL 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

JANUARY 4, 1877. 



Regular meeting at 714 o'clock P. M., Beujamin 
Pope, President, in the chair. 

PAPEKS FROM THE BOAKD OF ALDERMEN. 

Order for a joint special committee to pay the 
allowances of State aid. Ordered to a second 
reading. Near the close of the session the rule 
was suspended, on motion of Mr. Spenceley of 
"Ward 19, and the order was read a second time 
and passed in concurrence. The President an- 
nounced the committee, with the others given 
below. 

Order for the Superintendent of Printing to con- 
tract for 100 additional copies of the reports of 
Proceedings of the City Council from Jan. 1 to 
July 1, 1877, at an expense not exceeding $200. 
Read twice and passed in concurrence. 

WARD TWENTY CONTESTED CASE. 

On motion of Mr. Pelt of "Ward 18, the rule was 
suspended, and he submitted a report from the 
Committee on Elections on the petitions of John 
E. "Ward et al. and Jacob Schmidter et al., for a 
recount of the votes for Common Councilmen 
in "Ward 20. The recount gives the following re- 
sult: 

Nathan S. Wilbur 803 Stacob Schmitter 5 

N. S. Wilber 1 Herbert C. Bavis 495 

James H. Upham 786 Edward Ryan 272 

Joseph Morrill, Jr 576 William H. Varney 68 

James Devine 543 Lucius L. Ryerson 6 

Jacob Scnmidter 513 Osborne Parker 4 

And Morrill, Jr., H.P.Bailey, S. "W. Adams, 

Fred H. Nazro, "William Gray, Jr., and George P. 
Moore had one each. 

It appears therefore that Nathan S. "Wilbur, 
James H. Upham and Joseph Morrill, Jr., were 
elected, and that Herbert C. Davis, who received 
a certificate of election and now occupies a seat 
in this Board, was not elected. The committee 
recommend the passage of the following ; 

"Whereas, It appears from a recount of the 
original ballots cast at the last municipal election 
in "Ward 20 that Joseph Morrill, Jr., was elected a 
member of the Common Council in place of Her- 
bert C. Davis, who receivod a certificate of elec- 
tion, 

Resolved, That Joseph Morrill, Jr., is entitled 
to the seat in this Board now ocoupied by Herbert 
C. Davis. 

The preamble and resolve was read twice and 
passed. 

On motion, Mr. Felt was appointed a committee 
to conduct Mr. Morrill to the City Clerk to be 
qualified, which he did, and Mr. Morrill took his 
seat. 

PETITION PRESENTED. 

Mr. Pope of "Ward 14 presented the petition of 
James Kelley et al., for a recount of the votes for 
Common Council in "Ward 7 at the last municipal 
election. Referred to Committee on Elections. 

RECOUNTS OF VOTES FOR COMMON COUNCIL. 

Mr. Felt of "Ward 18 submitted reports from the 
Committee on Elections on petitions for recounts 
of votes for Common Council, with the results of 
the several recounts as given below. From them 
it appears that the sitting members from the sev- 
eral wards named are entitled to their seats. 

Ward 16. Petition of George E. Filkins et al. 

John Cross 603 Francis A. Davis 439 

J.Cross 4 F.A.Davis 15 



Cross 1 

J. C. Cros. 12 

Dennis A. Flynn 599 

Andrew Jackson 552 

Jackson 1 

Abraham Firth 530 



WiUiam Tuttle ....:.... 340 

J. C. Mahoney 54 

Timothy C. Mahoney. . 8 

Charles H. Doten 14 

Henry Jenkins 12 

William C. Kingsbury. 11 



Nathaniel GifiEord, George Dunbar, Joseph 
Doherty, George E. Bell, Neil Henry and H. A. 
Adams had one each. 

Ward 6. Petition of C. Blanchard et al. 

Michael Burke 1 

Michael Barr 556 

AbelB.Munroe 140 



John A. Kidney 974 

John Kidney 1 

John Kelley 802 

John Kelly 18 

Kelley 1 

John W. Fraser 793 

John Frazer 1 

WiUiam Taylor 628 

Michael A.Burke 606 



Munroe 1 

Torrey W.Sibley 127 

Albert E. Proctor 97 

Peter Eldredge 11 

Samuel P.Poole 2 



And James Quigley, Anthony C. Daley and Thom- 
as Gray had one each. 

Ward 4. Petitions of George Flanigan and 
Samuel G. Stone et al. for recount of votes for 
said Flanigan and Peter S. Roberts, the sitting 
member. 

Peter S. Roberts, 489, George Flanigan, 444. 

Ward 19. Petition of James leevan et al. 

James H. Nugent 524 JamesTeevan 447 

James Nug'snt 1 George Bellew 445 

H.Nugent 1 Wm. B. Shay 372 

Chris. J. Speucely 511 tteorge Werner 241 

C. J. Spenceley 3 John F. Curley 236 

James Fagan 481 Edward Cody 5 

James Fagin 1 H.W.Stone 2 

A. J. Leonard, Michael Burnes, "William Seaver, 
"William E. McCue, Michael H. Murray, "William 
Blanchard, Mathew R. W^alsh and Lowell B. 
Hiscock had one each. 

Ward 15. Petition of Peter Allen et al., and 
Charles L. Storrs et al. 

Oliver G. Fernald 683 Edward L. Barnes .... 448 

Oliver G. Furnald 9 George H. Noyes, 2d. . .348 

Fernald 1 George £. Noyes, 2d. . . 1 

Benjamin Pope 549 Henry McCoy 23 

RobertCox 535 W. Cole 19 

Nicholas Harlan 468 Benjamin E. Toombs.. 15 

And Hugh O'Brien, James A. Lappen and Thomas 
Brown had one each. 

Ward 3. Petition of George F. Doyle et al. 
Phinheas J. Stone, Jr. .617 Frederick B. Bogan. ;..592 

George B. Webster.... 608 James J. O'KeeSe 485 

John Kelley 606 Nathaniel D. Toppan..482 

John Kelly 17 John B. Wright 17 

Kelley 1 

Thomas "Willia, Francis B. Austin, Eben O. 
Hawes, Isaac Hobart and I. Roberts had one 
each. 

COMMITTEE ON FINANCE. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 13 submitted a report from 
the special committee appointed to nominate can- 
diaates for a Committee on Finance recommend- 
ing the election of Eugene H. Sampson, Phinehas 
J. Stone, Jr., J. Homer Pierce, "Webster F. Warren, 
Henry F. Coe, Moses "W. Richardson and Joaquin 
K. Souther. The report was accepted and at eight 
o'clock, the hour assigned, the Council proceeded 
to an election. Committee — Messrs. Spenceley of 
"Ward 19, Ruffin of Ward 9, and Barnard of "Ward 24. 

Whole number of votes 70 

Necessary for a choice 36 

Eugene H. Sampson 69 

Phinehas J. Stone, Jr 70 

J. Homer Pierce 69 

Webster F. Warren 69 

Henry F. Coe 70 

Moses W. Richardson 70 

Joaquin K. Souther 70 

Uriel H. Crocker 1 

John A. Smardon 1 

And the nominees of the committee wete declared 
elected. Notice sent up. 

COMMITTEE ON ACCOUNTS. 

Mr. Sibley of "Ward 5 submitted a report from 
the joint special committee to nominate a Com- 
mittee on Accounts, recommending the election of 
J. Augustus Felt, Osborne Howes, Jr., Roger "Wol- 
cott, Lowell B. Hiscock and Coolidge Barnard. 
The report was accepted, and at 8.15 P. M., the 
hour assigned, the Council proceeded to an elec- 
tion. Committee— Messrs. Sibley of Ward 5, Reed 
of Ward 17 and McGarrigle of "Ward 8. 

Whole number of votes 70 

Necessarv for a choice 36 

J. A ugiistus Felt 65 

Osborne Howes, Jr 63 

Roger Wolcott 68 

Lowell B. Hiscock 69 

Coolidge Barnard 69 

E. K. Webster 5 

J.J. Flynn 1 

I.P.Clarke 1 

Oscar Mowry 1 

And the nominees of the committee were declar- 
ed elected. Notice sent up. 

TREATMENT OF SCARLET FEVER. 

Mr. Pratt of Ward 21 offered an order, That the 
Board of Health be requested to consider and re- 
port to the City Council whether in their opinion 
any further legislation is necessary to prevent 
the spread of scarlet fever by contagion. 

Mr. Pratt— I do not know that any further leg- 
islation would be required to enable the Board of 
Health to take any action they might find neces- 
sary ; but I do think that a report from the Board 
of Health to this Council on the subject would be 
an interesting document. It is a fact gen- 
erally wellkhown, I think, that scarlet fe- 
ver is very prevalent in this city at pres- 



J A NTJ A H Y :4r^, ' : 1 8 7 7 , 



6 



em, and it is said to be ian ' epidemic 
disease just now, which is a sufficient reason fcii- 
calling the attention of the public to the subject. 
I am aware that the medical authorities are some- 
what divided upon tlie question' as to whetlier 
scarlet fever is a contagious disease or not; but I 
think that the weight of authority is admitted to 
be upon the affirmative side. I think that for 
social and practical purposes it is regarded by the 
best physicians, and ought to be regarded by all 
citizens, as a contagious disease, and if anything 
can be done to isolate cases of scarlet fever 
It ought to be done. I do not suppose that 
such action would be contemplated as 
is taken m respect to smallpox — 1 mean 
such extreme action with respect to iso- 
lation; but I think it would be well for the Board 
of Health to require physicians practising in the 
city of Boston to report to them all cases of scar- 
let fever, as they do smallpox cases, and it would 
be a comfort to many parents and citizens if they 
could feel assured that somebody was looking 
after the matter so as to procure as much isola- 
tion as possible, by advice, or otherwise, to those 
having charge of patients sick with scarlet fever, 
so that they should not be allowed to go to the 
public schools and expose themselves in public ; 
and perhaps that some care should be taken 
at the houses where they are confined, 
and in the neighborhoods where they live, 
keep them withdrawn from the sight of other 
persous. It is with the view of bringing this mat- 
ter to the attention of the Board of ifealth, and 
through them to the City Council, that I have of- 
fered the order, and I hope it will pass. 

The order was read a second time and passed. 
Sent up. 

COMMON COUKCIL EULES AND OEDEES. 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 5 ofEered an order for the ap- 
pointment of a committee to prepare rules and 
orders for the government of the Common Coun- 
cil during the current year. Read twice and 
passed, and Messrs. Sibley of Ward 5, Pratt of 
Ward 21, and Upham of Ward 20 were appointed 
said committee. 

ADMISSION TO THE ANTE-ROOM. 

Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19 ofEered an order. That 
the City Messenger be instructed to admit no per- 
son upon the floor of the Council Chamber or into 
the ante-room of the same wlio is not a member 
of the City Government, or persons properly in- 
troduced, while the Council is in session, always 
excepting those persons who are permitted by 
the President of the Council. 

Mr. Spenceley — I have been asked to offer this 
order tonight, and 1 think it is a proper subject 
for action at this time, as gentlemen must know 
that they may be annoyed a great deal, especially 
during the next two or three months, by persons 
talking, laughing and smoking in the ante-rooms. 
Last year I was frequently annoyed by such pro- 
ceedings in the ante-room. But I do not like the 
order as it now reads, and I offer the following as 
a substitute : 

Ordered, That the City Messenger be instructed 
to admit no person upon the floor of the Council 
Chamber, or into the ante-room of the same, who 
is not a member of the City Government, after the 
seats provided for visitors in the Council Cham- 
ber are occupied, while the Council is in session, 
always excepting those persons who are permit- 
tedlby the President of the Council. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 13—1 like the original order 
better than I do the substitute. I believe that if 
any member has a friend desirous of seeing him 
here he ought to be admitted into the ante-room, 
as there is no harm in it. There is a large ante- 
room for strangers, visitors and members to sit in. 
Last year it was occupied by the Sewer Depart- 
ment, but it has been vacated, and I think it will 
do no harm for members to introduce friends 
there. I hope the original order will pass. 

Mr. Spenceley— I think the gentleman is mis- 
taken in regard to the Sewer Department occupy- 
ing that room during the first part of the session 
last year; they had it during the latter part of the 
session. I recollect being greatly annoyed last 
year by men in there. If the v would go into the 
large room and do their talking there, I would 
not complain; but they gather around the door 
and talk, laugh and smoke, and a gentleman 
who is interested in the proceedings cannot hear 
them if he sits near the door. I objected to it last 
year and I object to it now. It seems to me that 
if members have friends coming here, they can go 
outside to transact business with them just as 



well as to have them go into the ante-room and 
among those inside. 

The substitute was rejected and the original 
Order read a second time and passed. 

, ■ (JOMMITTeSiS APPOINTED. , 

Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19 offered an order fo»ra 
joint special committee to nominate candidates 
for Inspectors of Ballast, etc. Read twice and 
passed. 

The President announced the following com- 
mittees : 

Joint Special Committees on the part of the Coun- 
cil to nominate City Officers. 

Overseers of the Poor — Messrs. Blanchard of 
Ward 21, McCluskey of 'Ward 13, Brintnall of 
Ward 5. 

Superintendents of Bridges— Messrs. Ham of 
Ward 14, Fernald of Ward 15, Beeching of Ward 1. 

Clerk of Committees— Messrs. Stone of Ward 3, 
Kidney of Ward 6, Jackson of Ward 16. 

Harbor Master— Messrs. Beeching of Ward 1. 
KeUy of Ward 3, Fraser of Ward 6. 

Superintendent of Streets— Messrs. Flynn of 
Ward 13, Pearl of Ward 1, Perham of Ward 23. 

Superintendent of Common and Public Squares 
—Messrs. Pope of Ward 14, Dee of Ward 5, Wilbur 
of Ward 20. 

Superintendent of Public Buildings— Messrs. 
Shepard of Ward 4, Blanchard of Ward 21, Brown 
of Ward 23. 

Superintendent of Public Lands— Messrs. Clarke 
of Ward 22, Cox of Ward 15, Kelly of Ward 6. 

City Architect— Messrs. Pierce of Ward 18, Pagan 
of Ward 19, McGarragle of Ward 8. 

Superintendent of Sewers— Messrs. Sampson of 
Ward 17, Blodgett of Ward 8, Day of Ward 4. 

City Messenger— Messrs. Howes of Ward 18, 
Ruffin of Ward 9, Shepard of Ward 4. . 

City Engineer— Messrs. Hiscock of Ward 21, 
Doherty of Ward 2, Cannon of Ward 7. 

City Surveyor— Messrs. Thorndike of Ward 2, 
Roach of Ward 7, Loughlin of Ward 13. 

City Registrar— Messrs. Ham of Ward 14, Clarke 
of Ward 22, Upham of Ward 20. 

City Solicitor— Messrs. Crocker of Ward 9, Ruf- 
fin of Ward 9, Mowry of Ward 11. 

Water Registrar— Messrs. Richardson of Ward 
10, Burke of Ward 2, Barry of Ward 22. 

Commissioner of Cedar Grove Cemetery- 
Messrs. Pierce of Ward 24, Morrill of Ward 20, 
Cross of Ward 16. 

Directors of Public Institutions— Messrs. Smar- 
don of Ward 10, Spenceley of Ward 19, Souther of 
Ward 14. 

Directors of East Boston Ferries— Messrs. Web- 
ster of Ward 1, Roberts of Ward 4, McDonald of 
Ward 12. 

Trustees of the City Hospital— Messrs. Howes of 
Ward 18, Reed of Ward 17, Duggan of Ward 12. 

Trustees of the Public Library— Messrs. Sibley 
of Ward 5, Barnard of Watd 24, Hibbard of Ward 
17. 

Trustees of Mt. Hope Cemetery— Messrs. Flynn 
of Ward 13, Pope of Ward 14, O'Donnell of Ward 
7. 

Commissioners on Sinking Funds — Messrs. 
Sampson of Ward 17, Danf orth of Ward 10, Vose 
of Ward 24. 

Auditor of Accounts— Messrs. Felt of Ward 18, 
Coe of Ward 23, Pratt of Ward 21. 

City Treasurer— Messrs. Stone of Ward 3, Rich- 
ardson of Ward 11, Thompson of Ward 9. 

City Collector— Wolcott of Ward 11, Warren of 
Ward 25, Webster of Ward 3. 

Weighers and Inspectors of Lighters and Other 
Vessels— Beeching of Ward 1, Nugent of Ward 
19, O'Connor of Ward 8. 

Joint Standing Committees on the part of the 
Council. 

On Assessors' Department— Messrs. Pope of 
Ward 14, Blanchard of Ward 21, Fraser of 
Ward 6, Richardson of Ward 11, Thorndike of 
Ward 2. 

On Claims— Messrs. Sampson of Ward 17, Howes 
of Ward 18, Ruffin of Ward 9, Richardson of Ward 
10, Pierce of Ward 18. 

On Common and Public Grounds— Messrs. Howes 
of Ward 18, Smardon of Ward 10, Hiscock of Ward 
21, Pope of Ward 14, Dee of Ward 5. 

On City Engineer's Department- Messrs. Thorn- 
dike of Wara 2, Kidney of Ward 6, Brintnall of 
Ward 5. 

On City Registrar's Department— Messrs. Smar- 
don of Ward 10, Upham of Ward 20, Nugent of 
War 1 19. 



COMMON OOUNCIJLi 



On East Boston Ferries— Messrs. Burke of Ward 
2, Reed of Ward 17, Roberts of Ward 4, Roach of 
Ward 7, O'Connor of Ward 8. 

On Fire Department— Messrs. Spenceley of Ward 
19, Burke of Ward 2, Cannon of Ward 7. 

On Fuel— Messrs. Brown of Ward 23, Vose of 
Ward 24, Doherty of Ward 2. 

On Harbor— Messrs. Beeching of Ward 1, Bar- 
nard of Ward 24, Cox of Ward 15. 

On Health Department— Messrs. Sibley of Ward 
5, Flynn of Ward 13, Cox of Ward 15. 

On City Hospital— Messrs. Morrill of Ward 20, 
Reed of Ward 17, McDonald of Ward 12. 

On Legislative Matters — Messrs. RufBn of Ward 
9, Mowry of Ward 11, Pratt of Ward 21. 

On Mt. Hope and Cedar Grove Cemeteries- 
Messrs. Hiscock of Ward 21, Hibbard of Ward 17, 
Vose of Ward 24. 

On Ordinances— Messrs. Crocker of Ward 9, 
Thompson of Ward 9, Richardson of Ward 10, 
Wolcott of Ward 11, Mowry of Ward 11. 

On Overseers of the Poor— Messrs. Blanchard of 
Ward 21, Flynn of Ward 16, Duggan of Ward 12. 

On Printing — Messrs. Pierce of Ward 24, Smar- 
don of Ward 10. McCluskey of Ward 13. 

On Public Baths -Messrs. Blodgett of Ward 8, 
Pearl of Ward 1, FernaJd of Ward 15, Loughlin of 
Ward 13, O'Donnell of Ward 7. 

On Public Buildings— Messrs. Shepard of Ward 
4, Wilbur of Ward 20, Spenceley of Ward 19, 
Pierce of Ward 18, Kelley of Ward 3. 

On Public Institutions — Messrs. Webster of 
Ward 1, Wilbur of Ward 20, Duggan of Ward 12, 
Brown of Ward 23, Loughlin of Ward 13. 

On Public Instruction— Messrs. Pearl of Ward 1, 
Coe of Ward 23, Shepard of Ward 5, Wolcott of 
Ward 11. 

On Public Lands— Messrs. Clarke of Ward 22, 
Crocker of Ward 9, Hibbard of Ward 17. 

On Public Library— Messrs. Morrill of Ward 20, 



Webster of Ward 3, Pratt of Ward 21, Warren of 
Ward 25, Cross of Ward 16. . . , 

On Salaries— Messrs. Danforth of Ward 10, 
Souther of Ward 14, Clarke of Ward 22. . , 

On Laying Out and Wideiiing Streets— Messrs, 
Flynn of Ward 13, Felt of AVard 18, Ham of Ward 
14, Perham of Ward 23, Day of Ward 4. 

On City Surveyor's Department— Messrs. Jack- 
son of Ward 19, Barry of Ward 22, Day of Ward 4. 

On Department for Survey and Inspection of 
Buildings— Messrs. Kelley of Ward 3, Fagan of 
Ward 19, McGarragle of Ward 8. 

On Treasury Department— Messrs. Stone of Ward 
3, Richardson of Ward 11, Danforth of Ward 10. 

On Water— Messrs. Fraser of Ward 6, Beeching 
of Ward 1, Jackson of Ward 16. 

On State Aid— Messrs. Webster of Ward 1, Rob- 
erts of Ward 4, Roach of Ward 7, Mullane of Ward 
12, McCluskey of Ward 13. 
Standing Committees of the Comm.on Council. 

On Police— Messrs. Cannon of Ward 7, Doherty 
of Ward 2, Kelley of Ward 6, Cross of Ward 16, 
Mullane of Ward 12. 

On Paving— Messrs. Fernald of Ward 15, Barry 
of Ward 22, Kelley of Ward 6, Brintnall of Ward 
5, McDonald of Ward 12. 

On the Judiciary— Messr.s. Crocker of Ward 9, 
Thompson of Ward 9, Richardson of Ward 10, 
Wolcott of Ward 11, Mowry of Ward 11. 

SOLDIERS' MONUMENT. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 13 ofEered an order. That a 
joint special committee to consist of three mem- 
bers of the Common Council with such as the 
Board of Aldermen may join, be appointed to 
take charge of the orection of the Army and Navy 
Monument on Boston Common, as provided in the 
contract with Martin Milmore. Laid on the table 
on motion of Mr. Flynn. 

Adjourned on motion of Mr. Beeching of Ward 1. 



8 



BOARJ3 OF AXjJ3F;T1MEN 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceeding's of the Board of Aldermen, 

JANUARY 8, 1877. 



Regular meeting at four o'clock P. M., his 
Honor the Mayor in the chair. 

The usual oaths of office were administered to 
Nehemiah Gibson, Alderman elect, by the Mayor. 

JURORS DRAWN. 

Six additional traverse jurors were drawn for 
the January term of the Superior Criminal Court. 

EXECUTIVE APPOINTMENTS. 

Mayor's Clerk— George F. Babbitt. Sent down. 
Constable— Henry F. Spach. Confirmed. 
Railroad Police— James R. Hathaway, Eastern 
Railroad. 

PAPERS FROM THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Order to adopt Joint Rules and Orders of City 
Council of 1876 until otherwise ordered ; order to 
amend order of this Board providing for similar 
action to the above ; order requesting copy of 

«ayor's Address for publication; order for publi- 
Ltion of the Municipal Re'eister and lists of com- 
ittees. Severally passed in concurrence. 

Order providing that special committees be ap- 
pointed, to consist each of three members of the 
Common Council, with such as the Board may 
join, to nominate the several superintendents 
and boards of direction as therein set foith. 
Passed in concurrence. 

Order for the several joint committees to resume 
unfinished business. Passed in concurrence. 

Order for a committee (Messrs. Flynn, Pierce 
and Fernald to be joined) to consider the topics in 
Mayor's address. Passed in concurrence, and the 
Mayor appointed Aldermen Thompson and Slade 
on the committee. 

Certificate of election of Committee on Finance. 
Placed on file. 

Order for Board of Health to inquire if any ad- 
ditional legislation is necessary to prevent the 
spread of scarlet fever. Passed in concurrence. 

ELECTION OF COJtMITTEE ON ACCOUNTS. 

A certificate was received of the election of a 
Committee on Accounts on the part of the other 
branch. 

On motion of Alderman Thompson, the Board 
proceeded to an election for Committee on Ac- 
counts on the part of the Board. Committee, 
Aldermen Viles and Gibson. John T. Clark, Hugh 
O'Brien and Nehemiah Gibson were unanimously 
elected. 

JOINT RULES AND ORDERS. 

Alderman Thompson, from the joint special 
committee appointed to prepare rules and orders 
for the government of the City Council during the 
present municipal year, submitted a report rec- 
ommending the reduction of the Committee on 
Water from eight to five members, to conform to 
the ordinance establishing the Boston Water 
Board, and the passage of an order, That the rules 
and orders of the City Council of 187G, as printed 
in the Municipal Register of that year, be adopted 
as the rules and orders of this City Council, with 
the followiifg amendment: In section one strike 
out the worcls "A Committee on Water, to cimsist 
of three Aldermen and five members of the Com- 
mon Council," and insert in place thereof the 
words, "A Committee on Water, to consist of two 
Aldermen and thi'ee members of the Common 
Council." Order read twice and passed. Sent 
down. 

RULES AND ORDERS OF THE BOARD. 

Alderman Viles, from the special committee ap- 
pointed to prepare n\les and orders for the gov- 
ernment of the City Council during the piesent 
municipal year, reported that no changes are nec- 
essary and they recommend the passage of an 
order, That the rules and orders of the Board of 
Aldermen of 1876 be adopted as the rules and or- 
ders of this Board. Order read twice and passed. 

APPOINTMENT OF COMMITTEES. 

The Mayor announced the following-named 
committees: 

Handing Committees of the Board. 

Armories— Aldermen O'Brien, Burnham and 
Wilder. 

Bridges— Aldermen Thompson, Burnham and 
Wilder. 



County Accounts— Aldermen Wilder, Fitzgerald 
and Gibson. 

Faneuil Hall— Aldermen Fitzgerald, Slade aud 
Robinson. 

Streets— Aldermen Clark, Thompson and Breck. 

Markets— Aldermen Slade, Breck and Viles. 

Lamps — Aldermen Thompson, Robinson and 
DunbLr. 

Licenses — Aldermen Fitzgerald, Dunbar and 
Robinson. 

Police— Aldermen Robinson, Breck and Burn- 
ham. 

Sewers — Aldermen Viles, Gibson and O'Brien. 

Paving— Aldermen Robinson, Slade and Fitz- 
gerald. 

Steam Engines — Aldermen Gibson, Viles and 
O'Brien. 

Joint Standing Committees. ^ 

Assessors' Department — Aldermen Wilder 
Breck and Dunbar. 

Bathing— Aldermen Viles, Gibson and Slade. 

Claims — Aldermen O'Brien, Thompson and Fitz- 
gerald. 

Common and Public Grounds— Aldermen Clark, 
Slade and Robinson. 

East Boston Ferries — Aldermen Gibson, Viles 
and Breck. 

Engineer's Department— Aldermen Gibson and 
Wilder. 

Finance— The Mayor and Chairman of the Board. 

Fire Department — Aldermen Burnham and 
Breck. 

Fuel- Aldermen Slade and Dunbar. 

Harbor — Aldermen Gibson and Robinson. 

Health — Aldermen Viles and Burnham. 

City Hospital— Aldermen O'Brien and Wilder. 

Public Institutions— Aldermen Thompson, Fitz- 
gerald and Robinson. 

Legislative Matters— Aldermen Thompson and 
Fitzgerald. 

Mt. Hope and Cedar Grove Cemeteries— Alder- 
men Dunbar and Robinson. 

Ordinances— Aldermen Breck, O'Brien and 
Burnham. 

Overseers of the Poor — Aldermen Gibson and 
Wilder. 

Public Buildings— Aldermen Fitzgerald, Slade 
and Robinson. 

Public Instruction— Aldermen Thompson, Fitz- 
gerald and Slade. 

Public Lands— Aldermen O'Brien and Gibson. 

Printing— Aldermen O'Brien and Dunbar. 

Public Library— Aldermen Burnham, Thompson 
and Viles. 

City Registrar's Department — Aldermen Breck 
and Burnham. 

Salaries— Aldermen Dunbar and Slade. 

Streets — Aldermen C^ark, Thompson and Breck. 

Surveyors' Department— Alderman Wilder ami 
O'Brien. 

Survey and Inspection of Buildings— Aldermen 
Wilder and Gibson. 

Treasury Department— Aldermen Gibson and 
Dunbar. 

Water — Aldermen Clark and Thompson. 

NomAnating Committees Joined. 

Overseers of Poor— Aldermen Gibson and Wild- 
er. 

Superintendents of Bridges— Aldermen Thomp- 
son and Burnham. 

Clerk of Committees— Aldermen Breck and Dun- 
bar. 

Harbor Master— Aldermen Fitzgerald and Rob- 
inson. 

Superintendent of Streets— Aldermen Slade and 
Breck. 

Superintendent of Common, etc. — Aldermen 
O'Brien and Thompson. 

Superintendent of Public Buildings— .Aldermen 
Thompson and Burnham. 

Superintendent of Public Lands — Aldermen 
Clark and Gibson. 

City Architect— Aldermen Fitzgerald and Dun- 
bar. 

Superintendent of Sewers— Aldermen Slade and 
Robinson. 

City Messenger— Aldermen Thompson and Rob- 
inson. 

City Engineer— Aldermen Gibson and Burnham. 

City Surveyor— Aldermen Viles and O'Brien. 

City Registrar— Aldermen Fitzgerald and Wilder. 

City Solicitor— Aldermen Clark and Fitzgerald. 

Water Registrar— Aldermen Gibson and Breck. 

Commissioner on Cedar Grove Cemetery— Ald- 
ermen Robinson and Wilder. 

Directors for Public Institutions — Aldermen 
O'Brien and Robinson. 



J ANITA BY a, 1877, 



9 



Directors of East Boston Ferries— Aldermen 
Gibson and Viles. 

Trustees of City Hospital— Aldermen Viles and 
Slade. 

Trustees of Public Library — Aldermen Thomp- 
son and Burnham. 

Trustees of Mt. Hope Cemetery — Aldermen 
Thompson and Break. 

Commissioner of Sinking Funds — Aldermen 
Clark and Gibson. 

Auditor of Accounts — Aldermen Gibson and 
Slade. 

City Treasurer — Aldermien Burnham and Dun-> 
bar. 

City Collector— Aldermen "Wilder and Viles. 

Weighers and Inspectors of Lighters — Aldermen 
Dunbar and Gibson. 

COMMUNICATIONS AND BEPOBTS FBOM CITY OF- 
FICEBS. 

Fire Commissioners. Report of fires and alarms 
for December— Alarms, 55; fires, 33; comflned to 
one building, 30; estimated loss on buildings, 
$39,613, on contents, ®51, 948.50— $91,561.50; full in- 
surance on buildings, $233,690, on contents, $143,- 
300— $376,990. Sent down. 

City Cleric. Communication nominating John 
T. Priest as Assistant City Clerk. Nomination 
approved. 

Auditor of Accounts. Monthly exhibit for Jan. 
1. (City Doc. 4) Total appropriations, $17,525.66; 
expended, $10,156,848.29; balance unexpended, 
$7,168,436.39. 

Chief of Police. Quarterly report for Dec. 31 — 
Arrests, 7481 ; males 6105, females 1376 ; Americans 
2999, foreigners 4482. Placed on file. 

Paymaster of State Aid. Payments for Octo- 
ber, November and December, $19,744; b.alance on 
hand, $590; applicants 3911. Sent down. 

Superintendent of Mort/i Scales. Receipts for 
quarter ending Dec. 31 last, $591.67; forty per cent, 
of which, less expenses, $36.93, has been paid to 
the Collector. Sent down . 

Inspectors of Lighters. Report for quarter end- 
ing Dec. 31 last. Receipts, $409.15; expenses, 
$16.40. Sent down. 

Superintendents of Bridges. Reports giving the 
number of vessels which passed through the 
drawSi as follows: Broadway bridge, 5038; Chel- 
sea-street bridge, 2; Congress-street bridge, 14,112; 
Dover-street bridge, 2346; Federal-street bridge, 
6305; Maiden bridge, 874; Meridian-street bridge, 
1572 ; Mt. Washington-avenue bridge, 10,115. Sev- 
erally sent down. 

LAMP DEPABTMENT. 

Alderman Thompson presented the annual re- 
port of the Superintendent of Lamps (City Doc. 3). 
Accepted and sent down. 

The past year has been one of great activity; the 
number of lamps having been increased by 1265— 
a number never exceeded during any single year 
except in 1874, when the increase was 1766; but the 
larger portion of the increase was then caused by 
the annexation of Charlestown,West Roxbury and 
Brighton, from which several sections the number 
of lamps received was 995, while the additional 
lamps located were 771. 

In addition to the large number of new lamps 
located during the past year, all the old fluid 
lamps have been discontinued, new iron posts and 
brackets located, with new lanterns, in which 
have been placed the most approved kerosene 
hurner ; thereby increasing the light on streets 
and places where they are located almost to the 
brilliancy of gas lighting. The number so changed 
during the year is 611, all of which have been so 
located as to be in proper position for the location 
of gas lamps when the mains of the several gas 
corporations shall be laid down in the streets and 
places where they are placed. 

During the year a large number of old wooden 
posts and small lamp supplies have been discon- 
tinued and iron posts and new and large gas sup- 
plies put in, adding much to the general good con- 
dition of the department. 

There has been a considerable increase of the 
lamps in the city proper, largely due to the locat- 
ing of lamps in the alleys and passageways at the 
northerly section of the city, thereby affording 
great additional police protection to persons and 
property in that locality. There is a continuous 
call for this kind of improvement, as there are 
many places and alleys, the residences of the 
poorer class, stlU unlighted. Many streets in the 
suburban sections of the city still remain unlight- 
ed and will probably call for the attention of the 
department the coming year. 



The lighting of the Common and public squares 
has received the attention of the department dur- 
ing the' past year, and lamps have been placed 
upon Independence square and Thomas park, at 
South Boston; Washington square and Orchard 
park, in Roxbury, and a portion of the parade 
ground on the Common, giving at once safety to 
the people necessarily passing, while adding 
greatly to the pleasure of the persons who fre- 
quent those resorts in large numbers during the 
evenings in the summer season for recreation. It 
has also been decided to place lights on Win- 
throp and Sullivan squares, in Charlestown. 

Price Paid for Gas for Public Lamps, per 1000 
feet— City Proper, $2; South Boston, $2.50; East 
Boston, $2.50; Roxbury, $2.45; Dorchester, $3; 
Brookline, $2.90; Brighton, $2.90; West Roxbury, 
$2.90; Charlestown, $2.40. 

During the year the price of gas consumed by 
the public lamps has, at the suggestion of the 
committee, been reduced per 1000 feet, as follows: 
City proper, from $2,081/3 to $2; Roxbury, $2.50 to 
$2.45; West Roxbury, $3 to $2.90; Brookline, $3 to 
$2.90; Brighton, $3 to $2.90; Charlestown, $2.50 to 
$2.40. 

And the result has been during the present 
financialyear to this time a saving of ovei $4000 
to the City Treasury. 

The number of men employed is 119, and there 0t 
are no supernumerary men. The men (100 in num- 
ber) who light and clean the gas lamps are paid 
at the following rates: City proper, 39 men; 
South Boston, 7 men; East Boston, 5 men ; Charles- 
town, 6 men; l%c per lamp per night; while in 
Roxbury. 19 nien; Dorchester, 13 men; Brookline, 
Iman; Brighton, 4 men; West Roxbury, 6 men; 
are paid at the rate of $1.67 per day. The 
lamps are lighted by the use of the torch. 
The men who light the oil and fluid lamps aie 
nineteen in number, as follows: City proper, 1 
man; South Boston, 4 men; East Boston, 2 men; 
Roxbury, 1 man ; Dorchester, 4 men; West Roxbu- 
ry, 5 men; Brighton, 2 men. The men employed 
to light the oil lamps are paid at the rate of three 
cents per lamp per night. 

The number of lanterns which have been re- 
ported by the Police as broken was 181 

By the lamplighters 7263 



1875. 


1876. 


Increase 


3980 


4043 


63 


491 


561 


70 


813 


878 


65 


1441 


1538 


97 


881 


921 


40 


69 


69 





431 


456 


25 


675 


743 


68 


259 


316 


57 



Total. 7444 

against a total of 8268, iu 1875. 

All repairs of the lanterns are done by the de- 
partment at the workshop on Albany street. At 
this shop there are five men permanently em- 
ployed, and two who work at piece-work on the 
painting of lanterns. In addition to the lanterns 
repaired as above, there have been 1511 lanterns 
and 3681 iron posts repainted during the year. 
The men employed at piece-work have also paint- 
ed 1577 new gas lanterns during the year. 

The following tables will show the number of 
gas lamps in use in the various sections of the 
city, on the 15th of December, 1876, as compared 
with the two previous years : 

1874. 

City proper 3814 

East Boston 470 

South BostoQ 763 

Roxbury 133 2 

Dorchester 810 

Brookline 62 

West Roxbury.. . . 338 

Charlestown 562 

Brighton 269 

Totals 8420 9040 9525 485" 

The balance of appropriation on hand 
from 1875, on the 1st of January, 1876, 

was ;?165,580.82 

There was expended during the remainder 
of the financial year 150,537.35 

The balance unexpended and transferred 
to other appropriations was ^15,043.47 

The appropriation for the financial year 
ending on the 30th of April next was. ... 493,738.00 

Amount expended to date 347,476.44 

Balance unexpended $146,261.56 

An amount suificient to meet all anticipated ex- 
penditures of the department for the remainder 
of the financial year. The committee of the de- 
partment, consisting of Aldermen Stebbins, Bur- 
rage and Thompson, have been untiring in their 
exertions to render perfect the lighting of tbe 
city. They have devoted many days to visiting 
locations tor which new lamps were asked, and in 
inspecting the public property. They have gener- 
ally supervised the purchase of all m'aterials used 
in th,e department, which have been procured in 
large quantities, with the advantages of the lar- 



lO 



BOARD OP ALDERMEN. 



gest discounts for cash. The expenditure of the 
department during the present financial year only 
exceeds that of last year at corresponding date by 
11557.26, notwithstanding the great increase in 
the number of the public lamps ; and it is confi- 
dently expected that the close of the financial 
year, April 30, 1877, will show a less expenditure 
than the financial year 1875-6. 

IfOETHAMPTOX-STBEET DISTKICT, ETC. 

Alderman O'Brien offered an order, That 4II un- 
settled claims or other unfinished business relating 
to the Suffolli, Church and Northampton-street 
districts be referred to the Committee on Public 
Lands, who shall be invested with the same 
powers in relation thereto that the said committee 
now have in other matters. Read twice and 
passed. Sent down. 

KETKEKCHMEXT IN EXPENDITURES, ETC. 

Alderman Fitzgerald oft'ered the following: 

Ordered, That a joint special committee of 
three on the part of this Board, with as many as 
the Council may please to join, be appointed to 
investigate the various departments of the City 
Government with a view to reporting what reduc- 
tion in salaries and clerical hire may be made in 
each department, without detriment to the public 
service, and also whether any department can be 
sijollshed or consolidated with any other depart- 
ment. 

Alderman O'Brien— 1 was not aware that any 
order of this kind was to be introduced today, and 
1 have prepared one myself, which I think covers 
a little more ground. I will offer it as a substitute, 
and ask that both orders go over until next Mon- 
day. 

Ordered, That a special committee of five on the 
part of the Board of Aldermen, with such as the 
Council may join, be appointed to consider and 
report on the alarming increase of municipal ex- 
penditures and municipal debt; and, 

First — To devise some means to reduce taxation, 
■ and to ascertain if the expenditures of the differ- 
ent departments of the City Government cannot 
be reduced from ten to twenty-five per cent., with- 
out detriment to the public service; and if it is 
not the duty of the City Council, when incomes 
have become so much reduced, labor so poorly 
rewarded, and property of all kinds so much de- 
preciated in value, to instruct all heads of depart- 
ments to make this reduction. 

Second — To request the new School Board to co- 
operate with the City Council in this movement to 
reduce expenses and taxation, or show cause why 
such a recluction cannot be made, as the belief 
has become very general that we are expending 
too much money on our schools without a corre- 
sponding benefit. 

Third — To ascertain if by some different arrange- 
ment of the sinking funds the overburdened tax- 
payers cannot be relieved, and if the credit of the 
city would suft'er if the interest on our actual debt 
only was raised by taxation every year instead of 
the interest on our gross debt, a tax deemed op- 
pressive by many citizens. 

Fourth — To consider the expediencj' of instruct- 
ing our representatives in the Legislature to put a 
stop, if possible, to the lavish expenditures of 
money for prisons and insane asylums now be- 
lieved to have exceeded all reasonable limits in 
the erection of very expensive buildings, and to 
watch more closely the expenditure of money by 
the State, as the city has to pay forty per cent, of 
the State tax. 

These orders appear to be rather important, and 
I sliould hope tbat action on them will not be 
pressed this afteiuoon. 

Alderman Fitzgerald — I see no difference be- 
tween the order otferea by the Alderman and my- 
self, save and except that it looks a little too 
much like dictating to the Legislature. They 
would be very apt to say it is none of your 
business, and we know our duty. I think that 
my simple order asking for a special committee 
to investigate the various departments of the Gov- 
ernment, and report to this Board what changes 
can be made in clerical hire and salaries, and 
whether any one department can be consolidated 
with another, will cover all that is absolutely 
necessary without going out of our way to 
instruct the Representatives in the Legislature 
to do that which they ought to know how to do 
themselves without any advice from us. Itninkthe 
spirit of the substitute is all right; but my objec- 
tion to it is, it looks more like an address than an 
order. Our orders substantially agree with each 
other, and 1 should hope, in order that we may get 
at the bottom facts in the matter, my order 



may pass as soon as possible. 1 shall not withdraw 
my order for that oftered by the gentleman. 

Alderman O'Brien — Last year the question of 
salaries was fully discussed by the Board, and 
salaries are but a mere drop in the bucket. This 
Board considered this matter of salaries, and the 
result, if I might say so, was a mere farce. If we 
are to reduce expenses of the City Government, 
I am satisfied that we must instruct the heads of 
departments to reduce expenditures. It is 
all well enough tor a committee of the City 
Government to call in the heads of depart- 
ments and ask them how little money they can 
possibly get aloug with; but you will find 
that you will not reduce the expenses of 
the City Government in this way one iota. 
I believe that we must instruct our heads of de- 
partments to reduce expenditures. 1 consider the 
State tax a very serious matter. I have no hesi- 
tation in saying that thousands and thousands of 
dollars have been squandered in prisons and in- 
sane asylums; and I think it is the duty of this 
Board, as representatives of the citizens who 
have to suffer to the extent of forty per cent., to 
instruct our Representatives from Boston to see 
that these expenses are reduced. I believe that it 
is perfectly legitimate to do so. If we do not take 
such a measure as that, all other meas- 
ures of economy will fail. There is another 
thing, and that is the large increase in 
our school expenditures. I believe in our 
public schools, and I wish to give them all the 
money that is necessary to carry on the system; 
but I "believe that unless we call "in the assistance 
of the School Board to unite in this movement, 
the present very large expenditure will go on. I 
have no objection to the gentleman's order; but I 
believe we ought to be very emphatic about this 
business. We have been discussing the question 
of economy tor two years, and yet it has never 
amounted to anything. I believe we ought to con- 
fine our expenses to what is actually necessary. 
But I do not desire to spring a trap on the Board. 
This is a question that 1 have no doubt all the Al- 
dermen would like to say something about, and I 
think that both orders should lie over till the next 
meeting. 

Alderman Robinson— It seems to me, with all 
due respect to Alderman O'Brien, that the surest 
way of arriving at the whole thing is by the first 
order, leaving it to a committee to investigate 
these charges, so that we shall know what we are 
acting upon and discu'^sing. I believe fully with 
Alderman O'Brien that this is too important a 
matter to be acted upon tonight; but so far as in- 
structing the Legislature, and things of that kind, 
I do not know how we can instruct them unless 
we know what we are instructing them about. It 
is all very well to say that you will call 
upon the heads of departments and ask 
them how they can reduce the expenses 
of their departments; but that is a very 
hard position to put a head of a department in. 
He has been here for years and followed the pre- 
cedents, and has persons in his service whom he 
believes earn their money. But that is not the 
question. The mere calling upon the heads of de- 
partments, without the committee, would not do. 
I agree with Alderman O'Brien, but still I think 
the first order the better. 

Alderman Fitzgerald— I have no objection to the 
passage of the substitute save and except 
that portion in which we instruct the 
members of the Legislature, or in which 
we tell them in so many words that they have 
been extravagant. I much prefer showing them 
our action first. If this Board acts economically 
itself, if it calls on the heads of departments first, 
and not only says they must be economical, but 
instead of $; 16,000 to run your department with we 
will give you $10,000, and you must trim your 
cloth accordingly, then the heads of departments 
must be economical. The true way to practise 
economy is to oblige them to be economical. We 
have it in our power to do that, without mak- 
ing an address to tnem. I agree with Al- 
derman O'Brien, that the expenses of all 
our departments are too large. I believe 
that the salaries of the heads of depart 
ments are too large when you consider the state 
of affairs and the small amounts paid to those 
who are beneath them. But it is not necessary 
to go through any preambles and resolves to do 
it. It can be done very quietly by reducing 
the amounts in the appropriation and salary 
bills, and they cannot help themselves ; and that 
is the end of it. If we begin in that way we 
can go to the Legislature with a good grace and 



J A N TT A R Y 



1877 



11 



say, go you and do likewise ; but it will come with 
a bad grace from us, when every department here 
is run extravagantly, to go to the Legislature and 
say you have been building extravagant prisons 
and insane asyhims, while "at the same time we 
have been building extravagant schoolhouses. I 
fancy the Legislature would say, "Mind your own 
affairs; we know our business." 

Alderman O'Brien— 1 wish to call the attention 
of the Board to the fact that this is not instruct- 
ing the Legislature. It is merely asking for a 
committee to consider the expediency of instruct- 
ing our representatives in the Legislature from 
Boston, who certainly ought to look out tor the in- 
terests of Boston in the expenditure of money. It 
is not instructing the entire Legislature, but mere- 
ly calling the attention of the members from Bos- 
ton to the fact that we believe the ex- 
penditures are too great, and that Boston 
has to pay forty per cent, of the State taxes. A 
few years ago the constables of the iViunicipal Court 
thought they ought to have more pay ; and instead 
of coming here and asking the advice or consent 
of the City Government, they went up to the 
Legislature as a delegation, and got their pay 
raised. Last year 1 offered an order here to cut 
clown the expenses of Sealers of Weights and 
Measures. But what did they do? They went to 
the Legislature and got a law passed that kept up 
the expenses of that department. I believe it is 
the duty of the City Council of Boston to instruct 
their representatives iu the Legislature to look 
more closely after the interests of Boston, which 
pays forty per cent, of the State taxes. 

Alderman Clark— I hope that the orders will lie 
over. It seems to me that they are not sufficient- 
ly understood for this Board to vote upon them 
intelligently this afternoon. I for one cannot do 
so. I do not propose to discuss the question at 
the present time of the reduction of salaries and 
expenditures in any of the departments. That 
question is not before the Board. It is simply a 
question which of those orders shall be referred 
to a special committee. 1 hope they will both lie 
over until the next meeting of the Board. 

Alderman Thompson — I hope the matter will be 
acted upon this afternoon. I think the sooner we 
commence this work of reform the better it will 
be for all parties interested. Now both orders tend 
to the same point, and that is a reduction of the 
expenses of the city. I like the order offered by Al- 
derman Fitzgeraldbetter than the other. One rea- 
son is it proposes a committee of three, whereas Al- 
derman O' Brien proposes a committee of live on the 
part of this Board. I think a committee of three 
is better than a committee of five. You get a 
large committee, and it is very difficult to agree 
upon anything. Therefore, I prefer the original 
order, so far as it relates to this Board. Then, in re- 
gard to the reduction of school expenses, the sala- 
ries of teachers are fixed up to the 1st of September, 
and we cannot reach them by rciluction 
until the matter comes before the Committee 
on Public Instruction, who, as the Alder- 
man has suggested, can appropriate so much 
for salaries and the School Committee will have to 
meet it by a corresponding reduction on their 
part. Tn regard to the other matters, it seems to 
me that if Alderman Fitzgerald's order is adopt- 
ed, the committee can recommend to this Board 
such action as they may deem necessary to carry 
out what Alderman O'Brien desires. I think that 
delay is not required. We can act upon it as well 
this afternoon as hereafter. Therefore I hope we 
shall act this afternoon upon one of the two or- 
ders proposed. 

The motion to substitute was lost. The order 
offered by Alderman Fitzgerald was read a sec- 
ond time. 

Alderman O'Brien — I think the committee will 
find it a difficult matter to proceed with so small 
a number. On an oruer of that kind requiring 
so much labor with a committee of three on the 
part of the Board, when they are divided up into 
sub-committees, they will find that they have alto- 
gether too much work on their hands. It has been 
customary on questions of that kind to have five 
members of the committee on the part of this 
Board, and a still larger committee on the part 
of the Council. When you divide this com- 
mittee up into sub-committees they will find a 
great deal of work for them to perform. The 
larger the committee in this case the better I be- 
lieve they will be. If they are going to inquire 
into every department, they will want a sub-com- 
mittee on almost every department. I move an 
amendment by making the number five on the 
part of the Board. I think that will be small 



enough if they intend to perfoim all the duties re- 
quired of them. 

Alderman Robinson— I would suggest to the Al- 
derman who has just spoken whether the end 
could not be reached as well by giving this com- 
mittee authority^ to appoint sub-committees. It 
seems to me that the thing would be reached 
much better and the result arrived at sooner. 

Alderman Thompson— It has been my experi- 
ence that when a matter has been referred to a 
parish nothing has been accomplished. Now, Al- 
derman O'Brien referred to the action of the com- 
mittee last year. The same subject was referred 
to the committee consisting of three on the part 
of this Board and five on the part of the Council; 
and certainly we had an intelligent report from 
them. I think that every member of this Board 
fully understood the condition of the different 
departments, and from that report how to act. 
I don't object to an enlargement of the commit- 
tees, if a larger number would not be an obstacle 
to success ; but I think that three members will an- 
swer for our purpose. Therefore I hope the amend- 
ment will not prevail. 

Alderman O'Brien — The question last year was 
merely that of salaries ; but now questions of still 
greater magnitude will be presented to this com- 
mittee. They will have to make extended inquir- 
ies into every department. If they intend to con- 
fine themselves merely to salaries, a committee of 
three on the part of this Board, and five from 
the Common Council is large enough. But 
salaries are a mere drop in the bucket. 
They don't amount to anything. After all 
their labors last year, the committee merely 
struck at the policemen, firemen and laborina- 
men. All the high salaried officers in City Hall 
were scarcely touched; and even if they had been 
touched, the reduction would not have amounted 
to anything. I say that salaries are a mere drop 
in the bucket. If this committee intend to reduce 
the expenses of the city of Boston, hey must 
strike higher than salaries; they must make the 
heads of departments economize in matters of 
more importance than salaries. If the reduction 
is confined to salaries it will be hardly worth talk- 
ing about. 

Alderman Fitzgerala— I object to the number 
five, because that will give eight on the part of 
the Common Council. It is my experience that if 
committees are large they become unwieldy, and 
the work cannot be done so well. If a commit- 
tee is composed of eight it will do the work far 
better than one of thirteen, which will be the 
case if five are appointed here. It will be 
much better for the whole committee to do 
the work than if they are divided up into sub- 
committees. I made the committee from this 
branch three, because the work will be done bet- 
ter and more expeditiously, and each member will 
have a better knowledge of the committee's work. 

The amendment was lost— 5 for, 7 against; and 
the original order offered by Alderman Fitzgerald 
was passed. Aldermen Fitzgerald, O'Brien and 
Slade were appointed on said committee. Sent 
down. 

WORK FOE UNEMPLOYED LABOEEKS. 

The following was received : 

The Street Commissioners respectfully report 
upon the order of December 15th, of the City 
Council of 1876, that they have but one improve- 
ment under consideration that might furnish work 
for unemployed laborers during the present sea- 
son — that is the completion of Ninth street be- 
tween Old Harbor and H streets, a distance of 
some fifteen to sixteen hundred feet, and involv- 
ing filling to the extent of some 6200 squares. 
To this time, iu contemplating the matter, 
the commissioners have, despite their favorable 
view of it, felt unwilling to involve the city in the 
payment of any considerable sum for the fee of 
the land required to place the street upon, and in 
conversation with the owners have not as yet 
found them willing to contribute it. The earth 
for construction is to be found in the immediate 
neighborhood and would probably be given for its 
removal. Newton Talbot, 

Chairman. 

Referred to Joint Committeee on Streets. Sent 
down. 

PETITIONS EEFERBED. 

To the Committee on Health on the part of the 
Board. Abraham B. Shedd, for leave to occupy a 
new wooden stable for four horses on Main street, 
rear 306. 

To the Committee on Public Lands. Ella Wy- 
man, to be compensated for lo.ss of right in pas- 



12 



JBOAR.I) OF ALDER.MEN. 



sagewayon Indiana place, wrongfully conveyed 
to another party. „ ^ ^ ^ , ^ ^ „ 

Maria Davis and E. S. Johnson tor abatement or 
assessment for raising grade of Northampton- 
street District. . ■ ^ 

To the Committee on Ai-mor^es. Company A, 
First Battalion Infantry, for an allowance for fur- 
niture of armory. . » t> . , 

To the Vommittee on Pamng. Morse & Remick, 
to be paid for damages caused by change of grade 
on Swett street. „. T^ ^ ^ 

To the Joint Committee on Fire Department. 
Freeman & Vinton, that receptacles for coal or 
wood ashes be required to be made of metal or 

To 'the Committee on Police. H. D. Rice, for 
leave to erect a sentry boxonTremont street, near 
Park-street Church. 

STREET AND LAKD DAMAGES. 

Alderman Clark offered orders to pay for land 
taken and damages occasioned in laying out and 
widening streets, as follows : 

Boylston National Bank, $3671.50, laying out of 
Swett street. „ , „ 

Eliza A. Upham, s^fSOO, laying out of Mt. Everett 

Daniel Davies and J. D. and G. T. W. Braman, 
$9460.44, widening of Beacon street. 
Severally read once. 



UNFINISHED BUSINESS TO BE RESUMED. 

Alderman Thompson offered an order, That th« 
several standing committees of this Board resume 
the unlinislied business of the last year which is 
anpropriate to said committees. Read twice anc 
tiassed. 

AUTHORITY TO LICENSE MINORS. 

Alderman Fitzgerald offered an order. That th( 
Board of Aldermen be and they are hereby au- 
thorized, in accordance with section 14, chaptei 
50, of the General Statutes, to make rules and reg- 
ulations to restrain sales by minors ; or to grant 
licenses for minors to make such sales, on such 
terms and conditions as they shall prescribe. 
Read twice and passed. Sent down. 

RECOUNTS OF VOTES FOR WARD OFFICERS. 

Alderman Viles offered an order, That the peti- 
tions for the recount of baUots cast for ward 
officers in Wards 6 and 15, which petitions were 
referred to this Board of Aldermen, be referred to 
Aldermen with directions 

to recount said ballots and report to this Board. 
Read twice and passed, and Aldermen O'Brieu, 
Burnham and Viles were appointed said com- 
mittee. 

Adjourned* on motion of Alderman Clark. 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



13 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

JANUARY 11, 1877. 



Regular meeting at half-past seveiv o'clock, Ben- 
jamin Pope, President, in the chair. 

PAPERS FBOM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Notice of the qualification of Nehemiah Gibson 
as an Alderman; Mayor's message appointing 
George F. Babbitt as Mayor's clerk; annual re- 
ports of Superintendents of Lamps, North Scales 
and Bridges; Auditor's monthly exhibit, Jan. 4 
(City Doc. No. 4); quarterly reports of Weighers 
of Lighters and Paymaster of State Aid ; report 
of fires and alarms for December. Severally 
placed on file. 

Reference to Committee on Streets of a Treport 
from Street Commissioners that they, have but 
one street improvement (Ninth street between 
Old Harbor and H streets) which might furnish 
work to unemployed persons. Concurred. 

Order of reference to Committee on Public 
Lands of all unsettled claims or other unfinished 
business relating to Church, Suffolk, or North- 
ampton-street districts, as therein set forth. Read 
twice and passed in concurrence. 

Order for Board of Aldermen to make rules and 
regulations to restrain sales by minors, or to grant 
licenses to make sales. Read twice and passed in 
concurrence. 

Report and order to adopt the Joint Rules of 
1876, with an amendment to section one, to make 
the Committee on Water consist of two Alder- 
men and three members of the Common Council. 
Order read twice and passed in concurrence. 

INVESTIGATION OF THE DEPARTMENTS. 

An order came down for a joint special commit- 
tee to investigate and report what reduction can 
be made in salaries and clerk hire, and whether 
any denartments can be abolished or consolidated. 

Mr. Pratt of Ward 21 moved that the order be 
referred to the Joint Committee on Salaries. 

Declared lost. Mr. Pierce of Ward 18 doubted 
the vote. At the request of Mr. Clarke of Ward 
22, the President read the order for information. 

Mr. Clarke — A portion of that order has been un- 
der consideration today by the Standing Committee 
on Salaries, who met very promptly and com- 
menced considering the matter of a reduction of 
salaries and employes in the different depart- 
ments. They have commenced that duty, and it 
seems to me that to employ another committee to 
do the same work and go over the same ground 
that they do, before they make their report, is 
rather a farce upon the Committee on Sala- 
ries, and taking work out of their hands 
that belongs to them and giving it to a 
special committee. I have no feeling in the 
matter, but I hardly know what the Salary Com- 
mittee will have to do if this matter is referred to 
a special committee. I supposedjthat the Presi- 
dent appointed men on the Salary Committee to 
do that work, and I don't see how it can be any 
better done by referring it to a special committee. 
If this matter is referred to the Committee on Sal- 
aries they can entertain the whole subject, and 
make a report wholly or in part, and go into an 
investigation of the whole subject within a rea^ 
sonable time. Therefore I hope it will be referred 
to the Salary Committee. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 13— This is a general order 
giving the special committee authority to look 
into the working of the different departments 
throughout the City Government. The Commit- 
tee on Salaries only have power to report to the 
City Council the salaries of the heads of depart • 
ments. This order also looks to abolishing some 
of the depai'tments. There can be no harm in ap- 
pointing the special committee, who can report to 
the City Council, and if the City Council is not sat- 
isfied with the report they need not accept it. 

Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19 — While I do not op- 
pose the order, my experience of the past year 
shows me that these special committees do not 
amount to a great deal. We had one appointed 
last year and have had no report since. I think 
the City Government is very much like a train of 
steam cars. It starts off, making a great deal of 
noise, but after the train goes you don't hear it. 
My impression is that this committee will be about 
the same. I would like to see any joint commit- 



tee that can give the time necessary to look into 
so large a matter as this of all the depart- 
ments in the City Government and seeing 
whether less clerks are needed in one place than 
are employed, and whether departments can be 
consolidated. It will take a year's time. I do not 
rise to oppose the order, for if anything can be 
done let it be done ; yet I do not see how it can be. 
That there is great chance for work in this sphere 
there is no doubt ; but the suggestion i would 
offer is that the committee in every department 
should take the matter into their own hands — the 
Committee on Public Lands to see if anything 
can be done in that department, and the Commit- 
tee on Public Buildings the same. It seems to 
me we could get at the bottom of this matter in 
that way better than in any other. At the last 
session a bill was brought in for a reduction of 
salaries, but some gentlemen who stood by the 
bill at first, opposed it finally because some of their 
friends in the departments were going to be cut 
down. That is going to be the case now, I sup- 
pose; we all have our friends, I suppose; 
and perhaps I should not want to be cutting 
down some and letting others go because I know 
more about some than I do about others. So I 
think there will be great difficulty in getting at 
anything in this matter. I think the best way to 
get at it is to let each committee take its own de- 
partment and go through it. In that way we can 
accomplish something, but in this way we shall do 
nothing. 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 5— This matter of salaries 
seems to be something that a great deal is said 
about. I don't profess to be competent to judge 
about what is right, and I presume that many 
others are in the same position. But this order 
has come to us, and what are we going to do with 
it? The question of salaries is to be looked after. 
My friend [Mr. Spenceley] says there is great diffi- 
culty. We are here to grasp difliculties. We 
never can know what a committee will do, and 
never shall, until it is appointed. I want to know. 
Let them go to each department and report on 
it. The head of a department carries out 
the work of his branch of the City Govern- 
ment, and this committee proposes to go 
through them all. I hope we shall put men on the 
committee who will investigate this matter, and 
report how many men are employed in each de- 
partment, and how many hours they work. 1 am 
in favor of the committee being appointed. Let 
them do this work, and let the Salary Committee 
do their work. What we want is good work from 
all the committees. 

Mr. Pratt of Ward 21— It is rather early in the 
year to begin relieving joint standing committees 
of their duties. I have two or three reasons for 
making this motion, which I thought might be 
worth presenting,without wishing to urge them very 
strongly. In the first place the order appears to 
be intended to forestall the action of the Joint 
Standing Committee on Salaries, who were ap- 
pointed for the purpose of looking after salaries. 
If that committee desire any assistance in their 
labors they might report back this order with a 
recommendation that it be passed. It seems to 
me that in courtesy to that committee it should 
be referred to them to indicate whether they wish 
any assistance in the matter, and if so, how. The 
order comes down after considerable debate in 
the Board of Aldermen, and the direction which 
that debate took in the other branch is sufficient, 
at least, to excite some thought upon the subject, 
and to induce any one, in voting upon the order, to 
consider it rather carefully ; and I thought it should 
lie over for a week for consideration, or be referred 
to the Salary Committee, as my motion contem- 
plated, for their consideration and recommenda- 
tion as to its passage or not. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 13— There are departments 
on which there are no standing committees of the 
City Council or the Board of Aldermen. I will 
cite one— the License Commissioners. They have 
no committee, even of the Board of Aldermen, on 
that department ; and today it is a fact that they 
are keeping some ten or twelve men at a salary of 
$1100, with nothing to do; all that work can 
be done by the police. This is a sweeping or- 
der, giving the committee authority to look into 
the different departments. There can be no harm 
in having them appointed, and in having them re- 
port to the City Council. 

Mr. Clarke — It seems to me that if this is re- 
ferred to the Committee on Salaries it gives them 
the very power the order proposes to give the 
special committee in this whole matter. I will 
state for the benefit of the Council that when the 



34 



COMMON OOXJNCTl. 



Salary Committee met today they had under con- 
sideration the reports on salaries of last year, 
and the report of the special committee; and 
this involves a large part of the work -which 
gentlemen propose to give to this special 
comraittee. We all know that after the Salary 
Committee made their report last year, a 
special committee was appointed, and after the 
vacation there were many inquiries as to what 
they were about. It seemed to he a political mat- 
ter rather than an investigation. They made no 
report until the last day of the year, and that re- 
poit was referred to this Council. That is the 
result of the special committee of last year. Are 
we going to make this appointment with a great 
array and noi^e ahout what we are going to do, 
and are we going to have it reported on the last 
day of the year and have it referred to the next 
City iCouncil ? It seems to me that is what this 
special committee will result in. 

The motion to refer was lost. 

Mr. Pratt of Ward 21—1 move to amend the 
order by striking out the words "what reduction 
in salaries and clerical hire in each department 
may be made without detriment to the public 
service; and also." 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 13—1 hope that amendment 
will not prevail. If that is stricken out the order 
amounts to nothing. The order is to ascertain 
what salaries can be reduced, and to report back 
to the City Council. 

Mr. Spcnceley of Ward 19—1 hope the amend- 
ment will not prevail. It seems to me that if any 
good can be obtair ed from this, that kills the whole 
thing. What we want to know is whether this cler- 
ical line can be reduced, and these departments 
abolished or consolidated. The Committee on 
Salaries, as I understand, will have nothing to do 
with this. It seems to me they can do the whole 
of it better than a part. The only question in my 
mind is whether any committee can give the 
time to do this. I believe it ought to be 
done, but I don't see how any joint com- 
mittee can go into it thoroughly. You must 
take the heads of departments; you cannot go 
into their offices and get a practical knowledge 
whether they need one man or a dozen. It may be 
that certain departments can be abolished, and I 
should be glad to see the one abolished that the 
gentleman [Mr. Flynn] has referred to, for I think 
it has been a nuisance to the city of Boston.' 
Therefore we may gain sojiething by appointing 
the committee as proposed, and let them do the 
best they can. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17 — I am in favor of ap- 
pointing this joint special committee, bat it seems 
to me we can amend the order so as to meet the 
wishes of the Council and still leave the question 
of salaries to be looked into by the standing com- 
mittee. I move to amend by striking out the words 
"salaries and." 

Mr. Pratt— I withdraw my amendment. 

Mr. Webster of Ward 3— It seems to me we 
might as well meet this question squarely on its 
merits. If we want a joint special committee to 
investigate this matter we might as well give them 
power to do it thoroughly; and if we don't want 
the committee we might as well vote against it. 
We might as well pass the original order as it 
came from the other branch, or drop the matter 
altogether. It seems to me it is hardly worth 
while for the Committee on Salaries, to report 
what salaries should be paid, if the joint special 
committee abolish a great many of the offices. 
It seems to me the two committees might get at 
loggerheads, and matters would get mixed up, 
unless the special committee has power to look at 
salaries also. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17—1 am in favor of the 
order as it came from the Board ©f Aldermen, ex- 
cept the part relating to salaries. It seems to me 
it is not necessary to appoint a joint special com- 
mittee to do the work just assigned to a joint 
standing committee who have entered upon their 
work. It seems to me that in investigating the dif- 
ferent departments this joint special committee 
will do a good work. And the information they 
will obtain will be very valuable to us. I hope the 
committee will be appointed and it will not tres- 
pass upon the regular committee. If any depart- 
ment is abolished, as the gentleman says, the sal- 
ary will not be required, and the money will not 
be spent. 

Mr. Clarke of Ward 22—1 would like to ask 
the gentleman on my left, [Mr. Spenceley of Ward 
19,] what he expects the Salary Committee are to 
do. If the two committees are to work for the same 
thing, what is the need of the Salary Committee 



doing anything ? It is well known that the Salary 
Committee are expected to make a report in time 
for the Auditor and the committees to make up 
their estimates ; but it seems to me that at the 
next meeting of the Salary Committee they will find 
that they have nothing to do, if there is a new com^- 
mittee appointed to do their work. If the Coun- 
cil choose to take that course, I am satisfied. It is 
a very disagreeable position for any gentleman 
to be on the Salary Committee. Certainly he 
does not make any friends by having such an ap- 
pointment. 

Mr. Spenceley— If I may be allowed to answer 
the question, I think it will be the duty of the Sal- 
ary Committee to bring in an order here on which 
the City Council will spend fifteen or twenty 
hours in debating, and then have it passed by. 

The amendment of Mr. Sampson was lost. The 
order was read a second time and passed in con- 
currence. The President joined Messrs. Blanchard 
of Ward 21, Reed of Ward 17, Webster of Ward 3, 
Pagan of Ward 19 and Vose of Ward 24 to the 
committee. 

SPEEAD OF SCARLET FEVER. 

A report was received from the Board of Health 
on the order in relation to preventing the spread 
of scarlet fever by contagion, that said Board has 
for a long time past been considering what, if 
anything, could be done to' prevent the scarlet 
fever. In its opinion the powers already given 
Boards of Health in this particular are ample and 
sufficient, and no further legislation is necessary 
except in this connection it seems proper to sug- 

f;est that the word "physician," as it occurs in the 
ourth and forty-eighth sections of chapter 21, of 
the General Statutes, should be clearly defined ; and 
they respectfully ask that legislation to this 
end be secured as soon as practicable. 

Kef erred to Joint Committee on Health. Sent 
up. 

RECOUNT IN WARD 8. 

Mr. Felt of Ward 18 submitted a report from 
the Committee on Elections on petition of James 
Kelley that they have recounted all the votes cast 
for Common Council in Ward 8, with the following 
result : 

Edward O'Donnell 707 .Tames Wight 242 

Richard Roach 687 O. S. Currfer 131 

Peter Cannon 644 John Q. A. Gilgrain 3 

George E.Bell 561 Daniel Ruhy 3 

Neil Henry 465 John Smith 3 

James Doherty 445 

E. Roach, James Wright, Lucius Slade, F. O. 
Hare, E. Kelley, Eugene Nagles, John W. Nagles, 
Frank H. Shepherd, Albert O. Crame, Robert M. 
Waitt and Peter Carman, one eacb. From which 
it appears that the members now occupying seats 
at this Board are entitled to the same. Accepted. 

EtTLES AND ORDERS OF THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 5 submitted a report from 
the special committee appointed to prepare rules 
and orders of the Common Council, recommend- 
ing the passage of an order. That the rules and 
■orders of the Common Council of 1876, as printed 
in the municipal register for that year, be adopted 
as the rules and orders for the government of this 
Board. Read twice and passed. 

COMMITTEES ORGANIZED. 

Mr. stone of Ward 3 reported that the Finance 
Committee had organized by the choice of Eugene 
H. Sampson as chairman on the part of this 
branch, and Alfred T. Turner secretary. 

Mr. Wolcott of Ward 11 reported that the Com- 
mittee on Accounts had organized by the choice 
of J. Augustus Felt as chairman on the part of 
this branch. 

NOMINATIONS AND ELECTIONS. 

Trustees of Mt. Hope Cemetery. Mr. Flynn of 
Ward 13 submitted a report nominating Alderman 
Richard W. Robinson, and Councilmen Robert 
Vose, Jr., and Joaquin K. Souther. On motion of 
Mr. Flynn, the rule was suspended and a ballot 
ordered. Committee— Messrs. Eraser of Ward 6, 
Webster of Ward 3 and Smardon of Ward 10. 

Whole number of votes 65 

Necessary for a choice 33 

Alderman Richard W. RobiHson 65 

Councilman Robert Vose, Jr 63 

" Joaquin K. Souther 61 

'• 0. J. Spenceley 1 

RiohardPope 1 

And four ballots for ineligible persons. 

Messrs. Robinson, Vose and Souther were de- 
clared elected on the part of the Council. Sent 
up. 



JANCJAKY 11, 187 7, 



15 



Trustees of the City Hospital. Mr. Sibley of 
Ward 5 submitted a report nominating Alderman 
Hugh O'Brien and Councilman John Kelley of 
Ward 3 and James H. Upham. 

jyir. Vose of Ward 24 moved that the rule be sus- 
pended and that the Council proceed to an elec- 
tion. 

Mr. Clarke of Ward 22— I think it has been the 
custom for years past to have these nominations 
lie over for a week, and I don't see any reason 
why that custom or rule should be changed at the 
present time. Unless something extraordinary 
requires us to make these elections immediately, 
we ought not, so early in the season, commence 
suspending the rules; particularly this year, 
when a large number of members are new 
members, who have hardly got acquainted with 
the different candidates. Some members have 
suggested to me that they would like to have this 
matter go over, so that they may make some in- 
vestigation, and see whether these nominations 
are agreeable to them. We well know that these 
appointments are to last for the whole year, and 
that some of them are very important Indeed 
for the interest of the city. I will state in regard 
to one report which will come in here tonight, and 
I presume that the usual motion to suspend the 
rule will be made, and that is the nomination for 
Trustees of the Public Library, which is a very 
important election, I accidentally came into pos- 
session of a copy of the Boston Tran- 
script of this evening and found quite a long- 
article written by Mr. Cheney of the Globe 
Theatre, which I do not i)ropose to read. The let- 
ter that accompanies it is short, if the Council 
will permit, I will read it. 

The President— Does it refer to the question of 
suspending the rules ? 

Mr. Clarke— Yes, sir. It refers to susj)ending 
the rule upon a nomination to be made this even- 
ing. 

Mr. Thompson of Ward 9—1 rise to a point of or- 
der. The communication which the gentleman 
proposes to read does not touch the matter under 
debate; and I will also suggest that the member 
referred to [Mr. Howes] is not present, and if the 
gentleman wishes to read that communication he 
should postpone it until that gentleman is present. 

Mr. Clarke — He is one of the candidates nomi- 
nated. If the nomination is laid over I will not 
read it, but if the suspension of the rule is forced 
I wish to read it. 1 don't desire to read it at 
present. 

The rule was suspended and a ballot ordered. 
Committee— Messrs. Spencelev of Ward 19, Reed 
of Ward 17, McClusky of Wajd 13. 

Whole number of votes 68 

Necessary for a choice 35 

Alderman Hugh O'Brien 68 

Councilman John Kelley of Ward 6 41 

" James H. Upham 58 

Joseph Morrill, Jr 26 

" Charles H. Reed 5 

" William Blanchard 1 

And two ballots for ineligible persons. 

Messrs. O'Brien, Kelley of Ward 3 and Upham 
were declared elected on the part of the Council. 

Directors for Public Institutions. Report sub- 
mitted by Mr. Smardon of Ward 10 nominating 
Alderman Clinton Viles and Couneilmen Eugene 
H. Sampson and James J. Flynn. Report accept- 
ed and Mr. Smardon moved a suspension of the 
rule, that an election might take place tonight. 

Mr. Barry of Ward 22 — I am willing to go as far 
as any one present to do anything to expedite the 
progress of business; but I think we are going a 
little too far in suspending the rule in this case. 
This is the first of the year. I am a stranger to 
most of the candidates nominated here tonight. 
The best way for us is to take these ballots home 
and find out something about these gentlemen, 
and when we come here next Thursday we will 
have found out all about the gentlemen who are 
seeking for those nominations. Then we will be 
competent to do what we were sent here for — se- 
lect the right men for the right places. I hope 
there will be no suspension of the rule. 

The rule was suspended and an election ordered. 
Committee — Messrs. Felt of Ward 18, Barry of 
Ward 22, Nugent of Waad 19. 

Whole number of votes 69 

Necessary for a choice 35 

Alderman Clinton Viles had 69 

Councilman Eugene H. Sampson 44 

Nathan, S. Wilbur 29 

" James J. Flynn 47 

" RlchardPope 9 

" Moses W. Richardson 2 

And D. A. Flynn and Otis H. Pierce one each. 



Messrs. Viles, Sampson and Flynn of Ward 13, 
were declared elected on the part of the Common 
Council. Sent up. 

Directors of East Boston Ferries. Mr. Web- 
ster of Ward 1 submitted a report nominating 
Alderman Charles H. B. Breck and Couneilmen 
Edward Pearl and John A. Duggan as Directors 
of East Boston Ferries. 

Mr. McDonald of Ward 12 moved a suspension 
of the rule, in order to proceed to an election. 

Mr. Hibbard of Ward 17 — It seems to me we have 
gone far enough in this matter. These men are 
both strangers to me, and I should like to have 
this matter lie over a week that I may learn some- 
thing about them. 

Mr. Thompson of Ward 9—1 want to express the 
same feeling. 1 feel that we ought not to vote 
simply on the recommendation of the committee 
without personally knowing something about the 
candidates. I do not even know these gentlemen 
by sight and should like to inquire something 
about them. 

Mr. Beeching of Ward 1 — The section I repre- 
sent is largely interested in the ferries, and I 
think I speak the wish of my colleagues when I 
ask that this matter lie over one week. 

Mr. McDonald — I hope, sir, that as we have gone 
so far, we shall finish up otir work tonight. Let 
us show that we are a progressive body. Let us 
put our work ahead and not let this matter drag- 
along. I think we should finish our work here 
tonight. 

The motion to suspend the rule was lost, and the 
election went over under the rule. 

Trustees of Public Library. Mr. Sibley of Ward 
5 submitted a report nominating Alderman John 
T. Clark and Couneilmen Osborne Howeo, Jr., and 
Richard Pope for Trustees of the Public Library. 
Report accepted, and the election went over, "n- 
der the rule. 

badges'. 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8 offered an order, 
That his Honor the Mayor be requested to ap- 
point the members of the Common Council special 

police oflicers without pay, and that Messrs. 

be a committee to procure badges for the same: 
the expense to be charged to the Contingent Fund 
of the Common Council. 

The order was passed to a second reading. 

Mr. McGaragle — That is a very important mat- 
ter. I move to suspend the rule, that it may take 
its second reading at this time. 

Mr. Webster of Ward 3—1 think the new mem- 
bers here would like a little information as to the 
duties of special police, what kind of badges we 
are to have, and what they will cost. I wish to 
vote intelligently, and I would like to know how 
to vote on this matter. 

Mr. McGaragle— In offering the order I am 
about as unfortunate as the gentleman himself. 
I can't tell him what the duties will be ; but I can 
tell him that the cost of the badges has been, in 
years past, from five to eighteen dollars. I put no 
price in the order, leaving that to the discretion 
of the Council. Last year, 1 understand, the 
badges cost about five dollars, and that they were 
very handsome. I think that will cover the cost 
this year. 

The motion to suspend the rule was lost— 36 for, 
24 against — two-thirds being necessary. 

SOLDIER'S MONUMENT. 

On motion of Mr. Flynn of Ward 15, the order 
for a joint special committee to have charge of 
the erection of the Soldiers' Monument on Boston 
Common, was taken from the table and passed. 
Messrs. Hiscock of Ward 21, Flynn of Ward 13 and 
Nugent of Ward 19 were appointed on said com- 
mittee. Sent up. 

PEOCEEDINGS OF THE STREET COMMISSION. 

The report of the proceedings of the Street Com- 
mission for 1876 (City Doc. 5) was received. Sent 
up. Following is an abstract of the report : 

The widening of South street, at the corner of 
Summer street, $42,054; extension of Fairfield 
street from Commonwealth avenue to Boylston 
street, $30,300 ; widening Portland street. $15,000 ; 
widening Beacon street, at junction with Brighton 
avenue, $9461.40; widening State street, $8000; 
laying out Rockland avenue, at Roxbury, $1750; 
widening School street at WestKoxbury, $1237.25; 
widening Elm street, at the corner of Washington 
street, $1,198.50; widening Fort avenue at Roxbu- 
ry, $1100; laying out Mt. Everett street at Dor- 
chester, $800; and slight widenings of Washington 
street at Roxbury, Centre street at West Roxbu- 
ry, Bast Fourth and Emerson streets at South Bos- 



16 



CO MM ON COUNCIL 



• ton, and Walkhill street at West Roxbury; esti- 
mated to cost together $1022. The total estimated 
expense of their operations during the year the 
commissioners find to be $111,923.15. Certain im- 
provements were effected where the land required 
was in possession of the city, or was obtained by 
Offsetting it with previous claims the city had up- 
on the owners, and to which In consequence no es- 
timates were put. 

There has been but one discontinuance, a small 
portion from Valentine street at Roxbury. 

The following betterments were assessed within 
the year : 
For the extension of Auburn to Leverett 

street, in 1874 g2,560.00 

For the widening of Pleasant street at 

Oharlestown, in 1874 3,028.00 

For the laying out and widening of Charles 

street, at Dorcnester, in 187i 2,378.84 

For the widening of Beach street, in 1874. 28,150.00 
For the widening and extension of Swett 

street to South Boston, in 1874 115,652.00 

For the widening of Shawmut avenue, 

from Lenox to Roxbury street, in 1874.. 9,223.00 

S 160,891.84 

?fine cases of appeals from the assessors' taxa- 
tion of real estate have been heard and decided by 
the board during the year. 



PUBIilC PARKS. 

Tbe second annual report of the Park Commis- 
sioners (City Doc. 10) was received. Sent up. 

The report summarizes the action of the com- 
missioners and the City Council on the subject of 
parks during the past year. The expenditures 
were as follows : 

Expenditures from Jan 1, 1876, to April 30, 
1876, as per second report §3,421.57 

Expenditures from April 30, 1876, to Jan. 1, 
1877 2,507.84 

Total expenditures for the year 85,929.41 

The appropriations for the Inriancial year 
1876-7, ending on the 30th day of April 
next, was g5, 000.00 

Amount expended to Jan. 1, 1877, being 
nine months of the financial year 2.507.84 

Unexpended balance Jan. 1, 1877 g2,492.16 

I'art of the above amount was expended as fol- 
lows: George F. Clarke, clerk,$1350; draughtsmen, 
$361.37; printing, $325.35; clerk hire in bonding 
lands, $308; district telegraph messengers, dis- 
tributing plans, $46.77. 

Adjourned, on motion of Mr. Clarke of Ward 22. 



B O AR D OF ALIDEK-MEN. 



17- 



GITV OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 

JANUARY 16, 1877. 



Regular meeting at tour o'clock P. M., his Honor 
the Mayor presiding. 

EXECUTIVK APPOINTMENT. 

Public Weigher— Harvey Wheelftr. Confirmed. 

PETITIONS REFEERED. 

To the Committee on Markets. Daniel Cum- 
mings <& Co. et al., occupants of stores on North 
and South Market streets, and E. Holden & Son, 
et al., occupants of Faneuil Hall Market, in favor 
of the i:eappointment of Charles B. Rice as super- 
intendent of said market. 

To the Committee on Police (Presented by Al- 
derman Burnham and referred vyith full power). 
Beniamin James et al., that "coasting" may be 
allowed on Sixth street, between G and I streets, 
and that it may not be prevented by police officers 
of the city of Boston. 

To the Committee on Licenses. John Glancy, 
for license as an auctioneer; N. "W. Day, for leave 
to extend his omnibus line so as to reach State 
street; Robinson & Emerton, for leave to run two 
passenger wagons from Boston & Maine depot 
through Sudbury, Court and State and Broad 
streets to Rowe's wharf. 

To the Committee on Paving. Henry Gassett 
et al., for a continuation of a plank walk on Cen- 
tre street, near Washington street,Ward 24. John 
English, to be paid for grade damages at 87 Porter 
street. 

To the Joint Committee on Claims. Ann Morris, 
for damages by reason of injury sustained on de- 
fective sidewalk on Court street, Charlestown; 
James B. Dow, to be compensated for damages to 
his property by entry of sewage into Roxbury 
Canal. 

To the Committee on Armories. Dexter H. Fol- 
lett, for an allowance for furniture for headquar- 
ters of First Battalion of Cavalry. 

To the Committee on Public Lands. Thomas 
W. Carter, for reduction of rent of wnarf on Al- 
bany street; heirs of Charles Davis, deceased, for 
abatement of assessment of Northampton-street 
district. 

'To the Committee on Sewers. David Scott et 
at., for a sewer in Eagle street, east of Putnam 
street. 

To the Committee on Health on the part of the 
Board. Petitions for leave to occupy stables as 
follows : Thomas Curley, new wooden, one horse, 
Greenwich street, Ward 24; George T. McLauth- 
lin, new wooden, two cows, Park street. Ward 22. 

HOBSE-BAILROAD PETITIONS. 

Petitions were received from the Metropolitan 
Railroad for a revocation of that part of the thir- 
ty-sixth location, granted June 25, 1874, extending 
from the intersection of the Merrimac-street 
switch with the tracks of said road in New Wash- 
ington street and across Haymarket square to the 
tracks of the Middlesex Railroad Company near 
the Boston & Maine Railroad depot, being that 
portion of said location which the Middle- 
sex Railroad Company constructed tracks upon ; 
and for leave to construct a single track in Lex- 
ington and Prescott streets, with suitable curves 
and turnouts, to connect with the tracks already 
laid in Meridian and Chelsea streets ; also for 
leave to construct a single track in Liverpool 
street, to connect with suitable curves, the track 
already laid in Meridian and Sumner streets. Sev- 
erally referred to the Committee on Paving. 

A petition was received from the South 15oston 
Railroad Company for leave to run their cars to 
Causeway street. Referred to Committee on Pav- 
ing. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 



Order to pay Eliza A.Upham .$800, for land taken 
on Mt. Everett street; order to pay Daniel Davies 
e< aZ. $9461.40, for land taken on Beacon street; 
order to pay the Boylston National Bank $3671.50, 
for land taken on Swett street. Severally passed . 

PAPERS FROM THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Report of the Public Park Commissioners (City 
Doc. No. 10), and report of the Board of Street 
Commissioners (City Doc. No. 5). Placed on file. 

Order for appointment of a committee (Messrs. 
Hiscock, Flyun of Ward 13 and Nugent to be 



joined) to take charge of the subject of the army 
and navy monument. Passed in concurrence, an^ 
Aldermen Thompson and Wilder were appoint^fl 
on said committee. 

A report of the Board of Health suggesting cer- 
tain amendments in the 4th and 48th sections ot 
chapter 21 of the General Statutes, by which the 
term "physician" should be more clearly defined, 
came up referred to the Committee on Health. 
Concurred. 

ELECTIONS. 

Directors for Public Institutions. A report 
came up nominating, with certificate of election 
of Alderman Clinton Viles and Councilmen Eu- 
gene H. Sampson and James J. Flynn, as Directors 
for Public Institutions. The report was accepted 
and an election ordered. Committee— Aldermen 
Robinson and Dunbar. 

Whole number of votes , 11 

Necessary to a choice 6 

Aloerraan Clinton Viles 10 

Councilman Eugene H. Sampson 11 

" James J. Flvnn 9 

Nathan S. Wilbur 2 

And Messrs. Viles, Sampson and Flynn were de- 
clared elected in concurrence. 

Trustees of Mt. Hope Cemetery. A report came 
up nominating, with certificate of election of 
Alderman Richard W. Robinson and Councilmen 
Vose and Souther as Tru.-tees of Mt. Hope Ceme- 
tery. The report was accepted and an election 
ordered. Committee— Aldermen Robinson and 
Dunbar. 

Whole number of votes. 11 

Necessary for a choice 6 

Alderman Richard W. Bobinson 10 

Councilman Robert Vose, Jr 11 

" Joaquin K. Souther 11 

And Messrs. Robinson, Vose and Souther were de- 
clared elected in concurrence. 

Trustees of the City Hospital. A report came 
up nominating, and certificate of election of Al- 
derman O'Brien and Councilmen Kelley of Ward 
3 and Upham as Trustees of City Hospital. The 
report was accepted and an election ordered. 
Committee — Aldermen Robinson and Dunbar. 

Whole number of votes 12 

Neoessarv for a choice 7 

Alderman Hugh O'Brien 11 

Councilman John Kellev of Ward 3 10 

" James H. Uphana • • • • 11 

" Joseph IVlorrill, Jr 3 

And Messrs. O'Brien, Kelley of Ward 3 and Upham 
were declared elected in concurrence. 

COMMUNICATIONS AND REPORTS FROM CITY 
OFFICERS. 

Notice of Vacancy in School Com,mittee. No- 
tice was received from the School Committee of a 
vacancy in that body caused by the resignation of 
John E. Fitzgerald, and proposing a convention in 
the committee's chamber on Monday, Jan. 23, 
1877, at 71/2 o'clock P. M. Concurred. 

Superintendent of Sewers. Schedules of cost of 
constructing sewers in Dorchester Brook valley, 
$5749.67, and Sai;gent street, $45,255. Referred 
to Committee on Sewers. 

School Committee. Requests for better accom- 
modations for primary schools on Washington 
street and Codman park ; and for a new site and 
building for the Allston School . Referred to Joint 
Committee on Public Instruction. Sent down. 

Annual Reports of Superintendents of Bridges. 
Warren Bridge, 5170 vessels; Charles River Bridge, 
7282 vessels; Chelsea Bridge, 1235 vessels. Sever- 
ally sent down. 

Directors for Public Institutions. Communica- 
tion requesting a transfer of $500 from the appro- 
priation for House of Correction to fit up and 
maintain the home for female paupers at the 
Austin Farm ; also for introducing water, erect- 
ing fire-alarm telegraph, etc. Referred to Joint 
Committee on Public Institutions. Sent down. 

BOND APPROVED. 

The bond of Henry F. Spach, constable, being- 
presented duly certified, was approved by the 
Board. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 

Alderman Robinson presented the annual report 
of the Chief of Police (City Doc. 7). Accepted. 
Sent down. 

Maximum for Jan. 1, 1876 700 

Vacancies 10 

In the service 690 

Appointments during the year 36 

72C 



18 



BOARD OF A3L.t)EliM:E]Sr, 



Died during the year 9 

Kesigned 10 

Blscnarged 7 



In the service Dee. 31, 1876. 
Vacancies 



Maximum force. 



26 

700 



700 



Saddle horses in use , 32 

Expenditures during 1876, $838,140.18, of which 
$776,784.66 was for pay of ofiBcers, $12,589.57 for 
fuel and gas, $3544.99 for police steamer ; care 33 
horses, $11,462.39; pursuit and detection of crimi- 
nals, $2044.48. 

The appropriation made by the City Coun- 
cil for the financial year from May 1, 

1876, to April 30, 1877, was §850,000.00 

The amount expended for 9 months, to 
Dec. 31, 1876, was 629,445.41 



Leaving a balance in the treasury of §220,554.59 



■which will undoubtedly be ample for the ex- 
penses of the department for tfie remainder of 
the financial year. 

There has been earned and collected by the de- 
partment during the year the sum of $25,699.94. 

The work done during the yeai' is as follows : 



Arrests 30,041 

Males 24,222 

Females 5,819 

Americans 11,768 



Foreigners 18,273 

Non-residents 6,118 

Minors 5.417 

Commitments 21,317 



Principal Items of Crime — Assault and battery , 
2258; felonious assault, 234; common drunkards, 
294; disorderly, 6503; drunkenness, 8564; simple 
larceny, 1715; larceny felonious, 535; nightwalk- 
ing, 322; suspicious persons, 1345; violation of 
license law, 2176; violation of Sunday law, 291; 
witnesses, 299. 

Nativity of Prisoners— United States, 11,690; 
British Provinces, 1047; Canada, 103; Ireland, 14,- 
578; England, 1068; France, 117; Germany, 739; 
Italy 94; Portugal, 14; Sweden, 129; Scotland, 312. 

Lodgers — Number, 63,726; males, 57,430; females, 
6296; Americans, 22,044; foreigners, 41,682; non- 
residents, 51,829 ; minors, 5228. Nativity of Lodg- 
ers—United States, 22,099; British Provinces, 3022; 
Canada, 456; Ireland, 29,589; England, 4916; France, 
424; Germany, 718; Italy, 92; Portugal, 27; Swe- 
den, 228; Scotland, 828. 

Miscellaneous Business. Accidents reported, 
1025; boats challenged, 145; buildings found open 
and secured, 2955; cases investigated, 9925; dan- 
gerous buildings reported, 46; dangerous chim- 
neys reported, 33; dead bodies found, 120; defec- 
tive cesspools reported, 107; defective drains and 
vaults reported, 737; defective fire alarms and 
clocks reported, 116; defective gas pipes reported, 
95; defective hydrants reported, 27; defective 
lamps reported, 3949; detective streets and side- 
walks reported, 7277; defective water pipes re- 
ported, 340; disturbances suppressed, 15,745; extra 
duties done by officers, 5331 ; hre alarms given, 290; 
fires extinguished without alarm, 277; intoxicated 
persons assisted home, 681 ; lost children restored, 
1480; rescued from drowning, 24; sick and injured 
persons assisted, 556; stray teams put up, 288; 
street obstructions removed, 6682; vessels board- 
ed, 180; water running to waste reported, 277. 

Amount of property taken from prisoners and 
lodgers and restored to them, $59,980.88 ; amount 
of property reported stolen in the city, $57,003.00 ; 
amount of property recovered, which was stolen 
in and out of the city, $57,994.80 ; amount of fines 
imposed by the courts, $153,801.00; amount of im- 
prisonment by the same, 2697 years eleven months ; 
number of days' attendance in court by ofiicers, 
21,482; amount of witness fees earned by them, 
$25,355.62; amount collected for dog licenses issu- 
ed, $15,818.00. 

Liquor Prosecutions during the Year 1876. 
Warrants obtained for keeping and selling with- 
out license 2,199 

Warrants of search executed and seizures made 1,355 
Warrants of search executed and no liquors 

found 474 



Total number of prosecutions 4,028 



Total number of gallons seized 32,654 



Ivots of seized liquors forfeited 1,222 

Lots of seized liquors returned to owners 29 

Lots of seized liquors not disposed of — 104 

Gallons of seized liquors forfeited 26,888 

Gallons of seized liquors returned to 

owners 1,088 

Gallons of seized liquors not disposed of 4,678 



1,355 



32,654 



Places where liquors were sold prior to 

Jan. 1, 1876. 

Places now licensed, which were opened 

priorto Jan. 3, 1876 924 

Places now licensed, opened since Jan. 

1,1876 : 179 

Places supposed to be selling without 

license. 868 



Number of places reduced during year. 



2,411 



1,971 
440 



Number of new places opened and licensed dur- 
ing year 179 

Total number of places selling reduced during 
year 440 

Nunber of places where selling has been aban- 
doned.. 619 

Arrests for Drunkenness — The following table 
shows the number of commitments for drunken- 
ness in each month for the last three years: 

Month. 1874. 1875. 1876. 

January 865 838 714 

February 847 717 558 

March 894 839 731 

April 865 774 747 

May 876 997 684 

June 957 851 746 

July 923 821 638 

August 1,192 1,043 724 

September 1,027 813 753 

October 1,156 905 882 

November 1,220 851 712 

December 1,058 876 675 

From a careful analysis of the records of the 
central office relative to offences agtanst proper- 
ty, it appears that the amount of property in- 
volved, compared with the number of offences 
committed during the last few years, has been 
much smaller than in former years; while the 
number of arrests made, compared with the num- 
ber of offences committed, is much larger. This 
has been so especially during the past year, the 
proportion of arrests made being more than four- 
fifths of the offences reported, although, as in all 
years, it has sometimes happened that more than 
one person has been arrested for participating in 
the same offence. During the year opportuni- 
ties for committing offences against property 
have been more than usually inviting. The 
very large number of houses left vacant dur 
ing the summer, with the frequent recurrence 
of day and evening processions, and the 
excitement attending the fall elections, have pre- 
sented unusual facilities for the work of the thief; 
yet the number of house robberies and street lar- 
cenies in the city has been much smaller than 
usual. During the two great street parades of 
the 10th and 11th of October, but two street larce- 
nies were reported for both days, and on the oc- 
casion of the great torchlight procession, on the 
night of the 26th of October, when both sides of 
the streets, over a route of six miles, were lined 
with a dense crowd of people ; while thousands of 
dwellings were left for the tiire unprotected, of- 
fering an opportunity for disturbance and plun- 
der without a parallel in this city, not a single of. 
fence against person or property was reported to 
have been committed. During the year no capital 
offence has been committed m which implicated 
parties have not been arrested and held before 
the courts; no bank has been broken and robbed; 
no general disturbance has occurred, and al- 
though a large number of arrests has been made 
for offences committed against property, yet a 
less amount of property has been reported stolen 
in the city than for the last sixteen years. 

ANNUAL EEPOET OF CITY SUKVEYOE. 

Alderman Wilder presented the annual report 
of the City Surveyor (City Doc. 9). Accepted. 
Sent down. 

The amount expended during the year has 
been — 
Expenses of city proper, South and East 

Boston and Charlestown §23,318.17 

Expenses of the Roxbury branch office 5 ,838.13 

Expenses of the Dorchester branch ofBoe. .. 6,698.81 
Expenses of the West Roxbury branch of- 
fice 7,123.03 

Expenses of the Brighton branch oflBce 2,193.42 

Total expenditure from appropriation for 

Surveying for 1876 845,171.56 

- The report includes a schedule of plans made 
during the year and the plans on file in the office. 

LICENSES. 

Alderman Fitzgerald submitted reports from 
the Committee on Licenses as follows : 
Order establishing rules and regulations for 



JANUARY 15, 187 7 



19 



licensing minors for the current year (the same as 
last year). Read twice and passed. 

Wagon Licenses Granted— French & Co., Old 
Colony freight station; J. A. Caldwell, 199 Devon- 
shire street; S. B. Stackpole, 175 South Market 
street. 

Pawnbroker's License Refused— William Jack- 
son, 268 Friend street. 

Dealers in Second-hand Articles Licensed— Elias 
Levi, 121 East Dover street; William Jackson, 268 
Friend street. 

Amusement Licenses Granted— D. S. Thomas, to 
exhibit a feat of pedestrianism at Music Hall, 
Jan. 19-20; Massachusetts Poultry Association, for 
annual exhibition. 

Junk Collector Licensed— John Shepard, 478 Par- 
ker street. 

Auctioneer's License Renewed— John R. Wols- 
ston, Chelsea street, Charlestown. 

Severally accepted. 

CAKE OF PUBLIC AND COUNTY BUILDINGS. 

Alderman Fitzgerald offered the following: 

Ordered, That "the Superintendent of Public 
Buildings, under the direction of the Joint Stand- 
ing Committee on Public Buildings, be authorized 
to supply the necessary furniture for, and cause 
such repairs to be made and cleaning as may be 
needed upou, the City Hall ; also such repairs on 
the police stations and engine houses, together 
with other public buildings as are not made by 
the respective departments using the same ; the 
expense to be charged to the appropriation for 
Public Buildings. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Public 
Buildings, under the direction of the Joint Stand- 
ing Committee on Public Buildings be authorized 
to supply the necessary furniture for, and cause 
to be made such repairs and cleansing as may be 
needed in the several high, grammar and 
primary schoolhouses ; the expense therefor to be 
charged to the appropriation for Schoolhouses, 
Public Buildings. 

Ordered, That the Committee on County Build- 
ings be authorized to provide the necessary fur- 
niture for the Court House and Probate Building; 
also for the Municipal Court rooms. Highlands, 
Dorchester, West Roxbury, Brighton, Charles- 
town, East and South Boston; the expense there- 
for to be charged to the appropriation for the 
County of Suffolk. 

Ordered, That the Committee on County Build- 
ings be and they are hereby authorized tj cause 
such repairs and alterations to be made as may be 
needed on the court house, county jail and pro- 
bate building; also, on the Jilunicipal Court rooms 
in the Highlands, Dorchester, West Roxbui-y, 
Brighton, Charlestown, East and South Boston; 
provided said repairs and alterations shall not ex- 
ceed the sum of $5000 on any one building during 
the municipal year; the expense thereof to be 
charged to the appropriation for the County of 
, Suffolk. 

Severally read once. 

SURVEYOR'S DEPARTMENT. 

Alderman Wilder offered an order. That the City 
Surveyor be authorized, with the approval of the 
Joint Standing Committee on the Surveyor's De- 
partment, to make such purchases of supplies, in- 
struments, drawing materials, and to incur such 
other expenses, as may be necessary for that de- 
partment during the present municipal year. 
Read twice and passed. Sent down 

PAVING REPORTS AND ORDERS. 

Alderman Robinson submitted the following 
from the Committee on Paving: 

Reports and orders of notice for a hearing, on 
Monday, Feb. 5, at four o'clock P. M., on petitions 
of Highland Railway Company, for location of 
tracks on Columbus avenue and Northampton 
street, etc. ; and on petition of Metropolitan Rail- 
road Company, for location in Columbus avenue, 
etc. 

On motion of Alderman Thompson, the orders 
relating to the Highland Railroad Company's peti- 
tions were amended so that the hearings would be 
on Feb. 12, and as amended were passed, the 
hearings being arranged as follows: For Metro- 
politan Railroad Company, on Feb. 5, and High- 
land Railroad Company, on Feb. 12, at 4 P. M. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized, under the direction of the Committee 
on Paving, to erect fences in front of vacant lots 
on public streets where the public safety requires 
the same. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized to grant permits to open the streets, in 



accordance with the tenth and eleventh sections 
of the revised ordinances of 1876 relating to 
streets 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized, under the direction of the Committee 
on Paving, to number or renumber any street, 
court or place within the city limits, whenever in 
the opinion of said committee the public conve- 
nience will be promoted thereby. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized, under the direction of the Committee 
on Paving, to furnish and set edgestones and pave 
sidewalks on any portions of public streets where 
the abutters agree in writing to pay one-half the 
cost thereof. 

Ordered, That the Supjerintendent of Streets be 
authorized to lay cross-wklks and pave gutters on 
the public streets of the city when deemed expe- 
dient by the Committee on Paving. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized, under the direction of the Committee 
on Paving, to contract, from time to time, for the 
purchase, sale and exchange of horses, the supply 
of hay, grain, paving stones, gravel and other ma- 
terials required for the operations of the Paving 
Department during the present municipal year. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
and he hereby is, empowered and directed to re- 
move, without delay, any and all structures or 
things which may hereafter be built into or upon 
the sidewalks of public ways in this city so as to 
hinder, incommode or endanger persons travelling 
thereon, or which obstruct or encumber the way. 

Severally read once. 

Report and order. That that part of the thirty- 
sixth location granted to the Metropolitan Railroad 
Company June 29, 1874, which authorized said 
company to lay a track across Haymarket square 
to the tracks of the Middlesex Railroad Company 
on said square, near the Boston & Maine Railroad 
station, be and the same is hereby revoked. Or- 
der read twice and passed. 

PUBLIC BATHS. 

Alderman Viles offered an order. That the Joint 
Standing Committee on Bathing be authorized- to 
repair and maintain the several bathing houses in 
the department under their charge, and employ 
such assistants in the care of said houses as they 
may deem expedient; the expense to be charged 
to, the appropriation for Public Baths. Read. twice 
and passed. Sent down. 

WARD OFFICERS IN WARDS SIX AND FIFTEEN. 

Alderman Viles submitt-^d the following : 
The committee appointed to recount the ballots 
cast for ward ofBcers in Wards 6 and 15 have at- 
tended to that duty and report that the following- 
named persons, having a plurality of votes, have 
been duly elected in Ward 6 to their resnective 
- offices : Warden- James T. Gallagher ; Clerk- 
John F. Mullin; Inspectors— Eugene Reardon, 
George H. Kyle, Michael J. Cox — being the same 
persons that the ward offic6rs of said ward 
declared to have been chosen. Your committee 
recommend that their certificates of elec- 
tion be transmitted to them accordingly. 
In Ward No. 15 the following-named per- 
sons having a plurality of votes appear to have 
been chosen to their respective offices, viz., War- 
den — William J. Splaine; Clerk — Charles J. 
Vaughn ; Inspectors— Charles A. Green, Charles 
B. Bedlington, Henry P. Muldoon — being the same 
persons who were declared by the ward officers of 
said ward to have been chosen, with the excep- 
tion of Charles A. Green, in whose place 
Patrick H. Dolan was stated to have been 
chosen. The attention of the committee having 
been called to the fact that Charles P. Bedlington, 
who was chosen an inspector of elections, was 
not a resident of said ward at the time of the 
election, inquiries were made into the matter, and 
the above allegation proved to be correct. Your 
committee recommend that the City Clerk with- 
hold the certificate of Mr. Bedlington, and that 
the vacancy thus created in the Board of Inspect- 
ors be filled pro tempore at the next election in 
said ward. Your committee recommend that the 
other ward officers chosen in said ward be noti- 
fied of their election. A table showing the num- 
ber of ballots cast for each officer is ai^peuded to 
this report. Clinton Viles. 

Choate Burnham. 

Committee. 
Ward No. 6. 
Warden— S^m^s T.Gallagher, 937; Charles G. 
Goussebaire, 541: John G. Albee, 148; Daniel F, 
Kelley, 11 ; Michael Burke, 1. 



30 



BOAJRU OF ALDERMEN, 



CTerfc— John F. Mullen, 945; Edward A. Downey, 
499; John Hayes, 132; J. Hayes, 27; Walter Mado- 
gan, 10; Charles G. Goussebaire, 1; William Tay- 
lor, 1. 

Inspectors— Eugene Keardon, 999; George H. 
Kyle, 971; Michael J. Cox, 964; David Flaherty, 
448; Jeremiah Gallagher, 438; Daniel W. Donahoe, 
401; Daniel Donahoe, 42; Jolm Taylor, 153; 
Thomas Gray, 151; Frederic Moro, 115; Fred. 
M.Moro, 59; F. Moro.l; Charles M. Butler, 23; 
Jeremiah A. Gallagher, 39; John Allen, 13; Isaac 
F.Smith, 13; Charles G. Goussebaire, 1; George 
Kyle, 1; Martin Ryme, 1. 

Ward No. 15. 

JTarden— William J. Splaine 492, W. E. Bartlett 
455, Robert J. Splain 101, Warren T. Porter 19, 
Charles J. Vaughn 1. 

CTerfc— Charles J. Vaughn 577, John J. Murphy 
479, Daniel Lewis 18, W.E. Bartlett 1, Charles A. 
Green 1. 

Inspectors — Charles A. Green 563, Charles B. 
Bedlington 561, Henry P. Muldoon 495, Michael J. 
Hallinan 494, Patrick H. Dolan 492, Joseph Osgood 
461, Michael Hallahan 98, Tobias Dinsmore 19, John 
Hallett 18, Joseph Chadbourne 18, W. E. Bart- 
lett 1. 

Accepted. 

ARMORIES. 

Alderman O'Brien submitted a report from the 
Committee on Armories, on petition ot Company 
A, First Battalion of Infantry, recommending the 
passage of an order. That the Committee on Ar- 
mories be authorized to expend a sum not exceed- 
ing $200, in fitting up the armory of Company A, 
First Battalion of Infantry, M. V. M., at Elson 
Hall, West Roxbury; said sum to be charged to 
the appropriation for Armories. Order read twice 
and passed. 

ANNEXATION OF SOMERVILLE. 

Alderman Clark offered the following: 

Resolved, That the City Council of Boston for 
the year 1877 hereby expressly confirms and re- 
news the opinion of the City Council of 1876, that 
it is inexpedient for this city to favor the pro- 
posed annexation of the city of Somerville to 
Boston ; and the Committee on Legislative Mat- 
ters are requested to earnestlj; oppose said meas- 
ure before any committee having the subject in 
charge. 

Alderman Clark — My object in introducing the 
resolution is this: Last year the City Council 
were unanimously in favor of opposing the annex- 
ation of Somerville to this city at the present time. 
I understand that a committee has been appoint- 
ed by the city of Somerville to urge before the 
Legislature the annexation of that city to Boston, 
and I take an early opportunity to ofEer this reso- 
lution in order to show to the Legislature the sen- 
timent of the City Council of Boston on the sub- 
ject. The Committee on Legislative Matters have 
on hand a large amount of business for the pres- 
ent session. It will be said, of course, by those 
who urge the annexation of Somerville that the 
sentiment of the City Council of 1876 may not be 
the sentiment of the City Council of 1877 ; and the 
resolution, Mr. Mayor, is merely to show to the 
Legislature and the community the sentiment of 
the City Council at the present time. 

The resolve was read twice and passed unani- 
mously. Sent down. 

IMPROVED SEWERAGE. 

Aldeiman Clark offered an order, That a joint 
special committee, consisting of three members 
of the Board of Aldermen, with such as the Com- 
mon Council may join, be appointed to resume the 
charge of all matters relating to an improved sys- 
tem of sewerage, with authority to -employ such 



assistants as maybe needed to enable the City 
Engineer to perform the preliminary work now in 
progress; the expense to be charged to the spe- 
cial appropriation for that purpose. Bead once. 

COST OF PUBLISHING ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

Alderman Fitzgerald offered an order. That 
hereafter, when any petition is presented ^to this 
Board upon which an order of notice may be,is- 
sued requiring public notice in one or more news- 
papers, the cost of the same shall be [jaid by the 
petitioner or petitioners. 

Alderman Fitzgerald— I offer this order because 
it seems tome that it is taking an unfair advan- 
tage of the city of Boston for private individuals 
or corporations to come here asking for special 
privileges, and to require not only those special 
privileges, but also that the city of Boston shall 
pay for publishing the notices that they are ask- 
ing for those special privileges. In the Probate 
Court the parties who present a petition pay for 
the notices, and there is no reason why railroad 
corporations should not do the same. I under- 
stand that last year the cost of publishing orders 
of notice was very nearly a thousand dollars. 
There is no reason why tbe cost of publishing 
these notices should not be paid by these corpora- 
tions. This matter was fully discussed in the 
Committee on Paving the other evening, and 
there was but one opinion in regard to it. It is a 
reasonable order, and the railroad corporations 
cannot object to it. 

Alderman Thompson— I don't know that I ob- 
ject to the order; in fact I approve of it, and it is 
reasonable enough, perhaps; but I am under the 
impression that the act of the Legislature requires 
the city to publish those notices. If that is the 
case, I don't see how an order of that kind can 
have any particular effect. 

Alderman Fitzgerald— The act says that the 
order shall be published by the city; but the cost 
must be paid by somebody, and we can require it 
to be paid by the petitioner. 

Alderman Thompson— It occurred to me, Mr. 
Mayor, that there might be some formality ot the 
law which would not be complied with should the 
order be passed. It seems to me that it would be 
better to refer the order to some committee to as- 
certain that fact. 

Alderman Fitzgerald— I am not particular about 
the passage of the order now, but I want to call 
the attention of the Board to it. It was expressly 
understood that the orders of notice passed this 
afternoon should be paid for by the corporations, 
—the Metropolitan and Highland railroads. I 
have no objection to referring the order, and I 
don't care to what committee. 

A.lderman Thompson— My object was merely to 
get a legal opinion on the subject. 

Alderman Fitzgerald— I move that it be re- 
ferred to the Committee on Ordinances, as that is 
the only legal committee of this Board. 

Alderman Robinson— The sentiments expressed 
by Alderman Fitzgerald were the opinion of the 
Committee on Paving, but I think it should be re- 
ferred. 

Alderman Fitzgerald— I have no objection to its 
being referred to them,with instructions to report 
whether the order can be legally passed by the 
Board. About its legality I have no doubt at all. 

The order was referred to the Committee on 
Ordinances on the . part of the Board of Alder- 
men. 

PETITION FOR OMNIBUS LINE. 

Alderman Fitzgerald presented the petition of 
Poland & Peabody for leave to run an omnibus 
line to carry passengers between South Boston 
and the northern depots. Referred to the Com- 
mittee on Licenses. 

Adjourned, on motion of Alderman Clark. 



COMMON COUNCIL 



21 



CITY OF BOSTON. 

Proceedings of the Common- Council, 

JANUARY 18, 1877. 



Regular meeting at TVg o'clock P. M., Benjamin 
Pope, President, in the chair. 

A PEBSONAL EXPLANATION. 

Mr. Howes ot Ward 18— Mr. President, it is a 
painful duty to have to rise to a personal explana- 
tion; it is something I have never been called up- 
on to do since I have been connected with the City 
Government, and in order to place the question 
betore the Council, I will ■ request the Chair to 
read this statement : 

Mr. Howes sent a slip of paper to the President, 
who read as follows : "To the Editor of the Tran- 
script—I have always endeavored to avoid any- 
thing which might have even the appearance of 
rushing into print, but I deem it due to myself and 
to the public to submit a few facts and queries. 
My theatre was built and completed, if not under 
the entire supervision of the Chief Inspector of 
Public Buildings, at least subject to his almost 
daily scrutiny, and was duly licensed, after pass- 
ing through most careful and competent inspec- 
tion. Two days after the recent terrible Brooklyn 
calamity, in itself sufHcient to spread panic 
throughout the land, a prominent member of 
the City Council, at a meeting of that 
bodv, denounced my building as -notoriously 
unsafe,' falsifying the rate of insurance and cen- ^ 
suring the Chief Inspector for having permitted it 
to be licensed, thus adding to the public fear as 
far as the Globe Theatre was concerned, and plac- 
ing both Mr. Shaw and myself in a cruelly false 
position. Mcie inspections were the result, and 
notwithstanding the Globe possesses a greater 
number of exits than any other building devoted 
to amusement in this city, and unusual facilities 
for egress in the event of fire or panic, Mr. Shaw 
felt it incumbent upon him to demand such alter- 
ations as to necessitate closing the theatre in order 
to conform to his requirements. I considered that 
I could do nothing better than comply. And now 
that the work is commenced and being 
prosecuted with all possible skill and vig- 
or, I would like to ask through your 
columns why the Councilman referred to 
endeavored to induce a lack of confidence in my 
theatre, involving me in a deal of unnecessary 
trouble and expense, besides stating that the rate 
of insurance on the Globe was 'one per cent, 
higher than the Boston Theatre,' when he, in his 
oificial capacity as Secretary of the Board of Un- 
derwriters, knew better? Do you think the fol- 
lowing letter, addressed to a prominent citizen 
and now in my possession, which I herewith sub- 
niit, will explain the motive? 

'Dear Mr.' : How many free passes and 

other considerations is Mr. Cheney going to give 
me for defending the reputation of his theatre — 
past, present and to come ? 

Yours, O. Howes, Jr.' 

By giving this space in the Transcript you will 
greatly oblige. Yours truly, 

Arthuk Chenev. 
Boston, Jan. 10, 1877." 

Mr. Howes— Six weeks ago tonight an order was 
introduced into this Council requesting that an 
inquiry be made into the safety of the various 
places of public resort in this city. You will re- 
member that it was a day or two after the Brook- 
lyn Theatre fire, and public interest was consider- 
ably aroused on the subject. A debate ensued on 
the question as to whether the Inspector of Build- 
ings or a committee of the City Government 
should make the inquiry; and in supporting this 
latter motion — which was afterwards carried — I 
made reference, in common with others, to what I 
considered instances of neglect on the Inspector's 
part in relation to the Globe Theatre. My 
remarks were incorrectly reported in one of 
the papers, and they excited considerable feeling 
on the part of the management ot the Globe 
Theatre; and when my attention was called to 
this, and the possible effect it might have upon 
theatre-goers, I wrote a note making the neces- 
sary correction, and stating that improvements 
in it had been made since it was first constructed, 
and in cither ways did all that I could to allay un- 
due public apprehension. But I was told that 
this did not satisfy Mr. Cheney, as representing 



the Globe Theatre; and from time to time I was 
told that he intended to sue me tor libel, and 
that he threatened to knock me down if 
he saw me. Indeed, the name of a promi- 
nent criminal lawyer was given as one whom 
he proposed to have a? counsel. While he was 
making these threats, I was somewhat surprised 
to read in one of the papers Saturday evening, 
Dec. 'J, a letter from Mr. Cheney, the latter part 
addressed personally to me, and asking questions 
which if I answered without comment would un- 
doubtedly help his theatre ; but if answered with 
comments would probably injure it in public esti- 
mation ; and 1 did not suppose he wished me to 
do the latter. Four days later an anonymous let- 
ter appeared in the Advertiser, asking me to state 
what the improvements and safeguards in the 
Glo)3e Theatre weie that were mentioned in my 
note of correction. I inferred, as this was sent to 
me, that it came from Mr. Cheney or his friends ; 
and that he was thus publicly, and through 
the newspapers, asking my support of his theatre, 
while he wa.s privately threatening me with a libel 
suit and a i^ersonal assault. This struck me as 
being insulting and absurd. I cut this last note 
out, and pasting it on a slip of waste paper, like 
this, I sent it to Mr. Hovey, a man with whom for 
the past four years I have had, from the nature of 
our business, daily, and I might almost say hourly 
association. I have here, through Mr. Cheney's 
kindness, a fac-simile of the note. If I had framed 
my words to directly express my exact meaning, 
they would have been something to this effect : 
"What right has Mr. Cheney to attempt to force 
me into the delence of his theatre?" Unfortu- 
nately I tried to give additional point 
to them by making them ironical ; but it 
seems that the eliort proved very much 
of a failure. It may be, as various newspapers 
have been so good as to suggest, highly unwise to 
be satirical on paper ; and for such an exhibition 
of folly I humbly beg their pardon ; but I was not 
so stupidly idiotic as to intentionally throw my- 
self into the power of a man who had just warned 
me that he v^ould ruin me if he could. I should 
like to state, in reference to this matter of a libel 
suit, that it was not a new idea. It was constant- 
ly on my mind. The day after writing this, which 
was on Thursday, the day of the meeting of the 
Common Council, I had a talk on this subject with 
Mr. Bacon, the reporter of the Advertiser (who is 
not here tonight), and stated to him at that time 
that Mr. Cheney intended to institute a libel .suit 
against me, and it was a question in my mind 
whether I could get the City Solicitor to defend me 
en the ground that what I said was in an official ca- 
pacity. The note was sent by Mr. Hovey , who was a 
member of the Executive Committee of the Board 
of Underwriters, of which I am Secretary — and 
also a Director of the Protective Department, of 
which I am Secretary— and a man with whom, 
from the nature of his business and my position, I 
had been brought for four years past into the 
most familiar business relations. " On another 
point let me say, that for the past three years I 
have, in connection with my other duties, been an 
editorial writer on a Boston daily paper, in which 
I am a stockholder, and, during that time, have 
not only been to the various places of amuse- 
ment in this city, the Globe included, for the pur- 
pose of writing criticisms on the performances, 
but I have had', from the free tickets ordinarily 
sent to newspaper offices, all and more than 
all that I could find time to use. Mr, Cheney also 
accuses me of falsifying the rates of insurance as 
regards his theatre in stating, in reply to a ques- 
tion, that it rated about one per cent, higher than 
the Boston Theatre. To this I can only .say that if 
I were asked the same question again I do not 
know how I could answer it differently. Under- 
writers' rates just now are mere matters of <'ompe- 
tition ; any one can make them, and a given risk 
may be taken by one man at eight per cent, per 
annum, and by another man at two per cent, for 
the same time. The only rate on the Globe Thea- 
tre that has been made authoritatively, and after 
a careful survey and classification, was made by 
the Board of Underwriters about two years ago. 
This fixed the rate at seven per cent. ThatoC the 
Boston Theatre was six. No other definite basis of 
comparison has since been made; and to take as a 
guide rates that may be one percent, today and five 
per cent, tomorrow would be simply nonsensical. 
Mr. President, for the past two years I have been 
a member of this Council, and there are quite a 
number here who have been associated with me 
during that time; and I can say it without fear of 
contradiction that never during that time, by 



22 



COMMON oouisrcix^ 



word or vote, have I been influenced by personal 
considerations. I have in all things, sir, endeav- 
ored to fultil my duty to the public entirely; and 
if by any utterance or speech of mine or others 
the Inspector of Buildings has found it incumbent 
upon him to close the Globe Theatre, that re- 
sponsibility, sir, is not mine. Those who suffer 
from words spoken here should look to the 
statutes of the State and the ordinances of the 
city tor redress, and not to those who are sent 
here by their constituents to carry oiit the laws. 

Later in the session, pending the election of 
Trustees of the Public Library, the subject was 
again brought up by Mi-. FJynn of Ward 13, who 
said— 

"I had the misfortune not to be present when the 
gentleman from Ward 18 arose to make a personal 
explanation. I, of course, am to blame for that, 
not being here at half-past seven; but inasmuch 
as the gentleman received unanimous consent to 
make that explanation, and inasmuch as quite a 
number of gentlemen now present did not bear 
it, I should like him to reiterate it at present, if he 
will." 

Mr. Howes — The gentleman spoke something 
about that to me, but I supposed he was speaking 
in jest. The copy from which I read that address 
has been taken by one of the reporters. I remem- 
ber very well the whole sum and substance of it. 
I gave it to the reporter as a matter of accommo- 
dation. Two or three were desirous ot getting it, 
and some compromise was made by one taking it 
right away and agreeing to bring it back again. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 13—1 only rose for the pur- 
pose of having the address which the gentleman 
prepared read to the Council again, as some of 
those present are desirous ot hearing what he did 
say, and I particularly, for the reason that on the 
7th of December, when the gentleman made an at- 
tack on the Globe Theatre, I told him that he 
ought not to have made such invidious distinc- 
tions in regard to the theatres. Knowing that he 
had carefully prepared an address to this Coun- 
cil, I wanted to know what he exactly did 
say, in order that I might refute some of 
those charges which he has probably made against 
a citizen of Boston and a heavy taxpayer — one 
who, from various circumstances, is unable to re- 
ply to him in any charges which he may make 
here against him, and that is Mr. Arthur Cheney. 
I want Mr. Cheney to have the same privileges 
and right that he has, notwithstanding that he is 
a member of this Council, and to reiDly, if not by 
myself, by others. It was brought about by the 
gentleman himself on the night of the 7th of De- 
cember, in making an invidious distinction, in 
charging upon one gentleman, or upon his thea- 
tre, that it was notoriously unsafe, and that at that 
time he was paying one jDer cent, more insurance 
on his building than others were. All I want is 
an opportunity to reply to the gentleman if I think 
he has reflected imfairly upon that gentleman, or 
upon his theatre. As I said before, it is my fault 
that I was not present at that time to listen to his 
address and to his remarks, which, as I said be- 
fore, were very carefully prepared and presented 
to the Council. 

Mr. Howes— I am exceedingly sorry that the 
gentleman was not present, and I am rather 
sorry now to be placed in the position 
that I am. I tried to get one of the mes- 
sengers to go to the Herald oflSce to get the copy, 
but he thinks it impossible to get it. I do not 
know that I have made any charges against Mr. 
Cheney that need defence ; certainly I have made 
no charges that could be defended by any state- 
ment of his friends that are here. The only point 
that the gentleman seems to make on this issue is 
that I made an attack uiDon Mr. Cheney's theatre 
on the 7th of December. As I said before (and I 
will repeat, for the gentleman's edification, what I 
said a few minutes ago), six weeks ago I stated 
that the rates of insurance upon the Globe Theatre 
were about one per cent, higher than they were 
upon the Boston Theatre. I think those were 
my exact words, I stated in the written address 
that there are now no such thing as insurance 
rates in the city of Boston. The matter of in- 
surance is a matter of competition. As far as 
our board rates are concerned, on which Mr. Che- 
ney bases his contradiction, Mr. Cheney might 
have his theatre, if he wished, rated at one-quarter 
oi one per cent., just as well as at four per cent. 
The rates of insurance made two years ago in this 
city, made from careful surveys by experienced 
men, placed the Globe Theatre at seven per cent, 
and the Boston Theatre at six per cent. Since 
that time there have been no rates of insurance put 



upon those theatres by survey ; the only rates put 
upon them is what any man will take it for. Mr. 
Cheney, or his agents, might get an agent to take 
it for one rate ; and they might go along the street 
a little farther and find another agent who would 
take it for another rate; while another one might 
not take it, as a member of the Council has told 
me himself, that he would hardly take it at all. So 
much for the rates of insurance. The only rates 
made put the difference at that point. On the oth- 
er charge — the charge of a want of security in the 
theatre— I have nothing to say. The Inspector of 
Buildings has examined that theatre, and it is 
closed. I don't know of any other theatre in the 
city that is. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 13— So far as any other 
member of this Council, in the same bvisin'ess, tell- 
ing him that he would not take it, that may be 
very readily accounted for. Perhaps that mem- 
ber could not get the insurance from Mr. Cheney 
—I don't care who the member or who the person 
is who told him. But it does seem to me that this 
controversy, which has been brought about by the 
gentleman from Ward 18, in his speech here in 
the Council on the 7th of December, characteriz- 
ing that theiatre as an unsafe theatre, and com- 
pelling that man to close his place of business, is 
unfair and unjust when he is unable to reply to it. 
I am not an advocate of Mr. Cheney or anybody, 
but I am an advocate of people generally who are 
attacked by members of this Council in their offi- 
cial position, and I am here to defend those who 
are unable to reply to them. I say that this gentle- 
man did make an unwarrantable attack upon that 
gentleman at that time, compelling him to close 
his theatre. An order from the Inspector of 
Buildings closed both the Museum and the How- 
ard Athenaeum. This man, who is a public-spirited 
citizen, did close his theatre, while the others — the 
Howard Athenaeum and the Museum — have gone 
on from that day to this making repairs. I only 
rise in justice to Mr. Cheney to say that the gen- 
tleman at that time was out of order, and ought 
not to have attacked him, and made an invidious 
distinction as between the Globe and the Boston 
theatres. 

Mr. Howes— I have but one word to say in reply. 
In reply to my characterization of the Globe The- 
atre, the gentleman who has just sat down also 
characterized two other theatres, and I don't 
know that I said anything worse about the Globe 
than he did about the other two. I read from the 
remarks made by that gentleman in the Common 
Council [Dec 7] :" 

"At that time the Inspector inspected the Globe 
Theatre, as he did all the other theatres. I hardly 
think it is fair to criticise one theatre and let the 
others go, for I believe that the Boston Museum 
and the Howard Athenaeum are the worst in the 
city today. If a panic should occur at the Museum 
half the people would never get out; and the 
Howard Athenaeum is a still worse place." 

I don't know that I ever said that half the peo- 
ple could not get out of the Globe Theatre in case 
of a panic. I don't see how anj' one who believes 
the statement of the gentleman would dare go in- 
to the Boston Museum or Howard Athenaeum. 
Why, sir, he made that statement, and now he ac- 
cuses me of making an invidious distinction in re- 
gard to the Globe Theatre. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 13— Let me say that the re- 
marks made by the gentleman on that nigtit were 
never reported in full in the Traiiscript, or in any 
oflBcial report made by the reporter ot this Coun- 
cil. Now, who had it cut out or erased from the 
journal? It was in the Advertiser, but it never 
has been reported to this Council. 

Mr. Howes— I dislike to continue this altei ca- 
tion any longer, but I would ask the gentleman 
which was the part of wisdom?— and 1 say this 
in defence of the official reporter. He states that 
I made an unjust accusation against the Globe, or 
against Mr. Cheney. I thought that might be the 
case, and oti that account I went to the Tran- 
script and had taken from the report certain parts 
of it that might be. Gentlemen may smile — 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 13— What right had you to 
do it? 

Mr. Howes— If the gentleman supposes that the 
speeches made here are taken down verbatim, he 
makes a mistake. It is very largely left to the 
official reporter to decide how much shall be put 
in and shall be left out, and he undoubtedly 
endeavors to give the sense of what the speaker 
says. Since I have been in this Council, I never 
saw the time when my address was taken down 
entirely; but, with all due respect to the reporter, 
he has told me quite a number of times that he 



JANUARY 18, 1877 



23 



could not catch wbat I said, and that he had to 
suppose it. If there are changes on one side there 
may be on the other. 

PAPERS FROBI THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Petitions were referred in concurrence. 

Annual reports of Superintendents of Charles 
River, Chelsea and Warren bridges: Chief of 
Police; City Surveyor. Severally placed on file. 

Requests of SchooJ Committee for a new site for 
Allston School and for better accommodations 
for schools on Washington street and Codman 
park; and request of Directors for Public Institu- 
tions for additional appropriation for Home for 
Female Paupers. Severally referred, in concur- 

I'GBiCG. 

Resolve inexpedient to favor annexation of 
Somerville to Boston, and for the Committee on 
Legislative Matters to oppose the matter. Read 
twice and passed in concurrence. 

Order for Committee on Bathing to repair and 
maintain the bathing houses, to employ assistance 
and take measures for the care and preservation 
of said houses. Ordered to a second reading. 

Order tor City Surveyor to make purchases of 
supplies, instruments and drawing materials, and 
to incur other necessary expenses. Ordered to a 
second reading. 

ELECTIOKS. 

The following elections came up under unfin- 
ished business : 

Directors of East Boston Ferries. Committee- 
Messrs. Smardon of Ward 10, Flynn of Ward 16, 
and MuUane of Ward 12. 

Whole number of votes. 64 

jiecessary for a choice 33 

Alderman C. H. B. Breck 64 

Councilman Edward Pearl 46 

" John A. Duggan 39 

" Phinehas J. Stone, Jr 25 

Isaac P.Clarke 18 

And Messrs. Breck, Pearl and Duggan were de- 
clared elected. Sent up. 

Trustees of the Public Library. Pending the 
ordering of an election, the discussion printed 
above ^under "a personal explanation") occurred, 
after which the ballot proceeded. Committee- 
Messrs. Stone of Ward 3, Doherty of Ward 2, Vose 
of Ward 24. 

Whole number of votes 65 

Necessary lor a choice 33 

Alderman John T. Clark 65 

Coiincilnian Richard Pope 49 

Charles H. Reed 29 

" Osborne Howes, Jr 22 

•• Christopher J. Spenceley 12 

" John A. Smardon 1 

G.K.Webster 1 

Messrs. Clark and Pope were declared elected, 
and a second ballot was ordered to fill the vacancy. 

Whole number of votes 68 

Necessary for a choice 35 

Councilman Charles H. Reed 37 

" Osborne Howes, Jr 30 

E.R. Webster 1 

And Mr. Reed was declared elected. Sent up. 

UADGES. 

The order requesting the Mayor to appoint 
Common Councilmen as Special Police Officers, 
and for a committee to procure badges, was con- 
sidered under unfinished business. 

Mr. Mowry of Ward 11 — I move that this matter 
be laid upon the table. If that motion is carried 
I shall introduce an order requesting the Judiciary 
Committee to ascertain from the City Solicitor the 
legality of this matter. 

Mr. McGaragle of AVard 8—1 have no particular 
objection to laying the order upon the table, but I 
think we should at least have better and more 
substantial reasons for laying it there. This City 
Council has had badges for ten years — since 1868 — 
and certainly, in intellect, previous Councils must 
come pretty near this body. If there is any ille- 
gality in it, some member of this body in previous 
years would have seen it and brought it up. 
In introducing the order I don't wish 
to honor myself with a badge. But it 
has been a customary order to introduce 
for ten years. There is always some unlucky in- 
dividual hit upon to introduce the order, and it is 
my lot this year. Unless the gentleman has got 
some more substantial reason, I hope the matter 
will not be laid upon the table. 

Mr. Thompson of Ward 9—1 do not see but what 
the reasons assigned for the motion are very sub- 
stantial. I have not given the question any par- 
ticular consideration, but if any gentleman in the 
house doubts the legality of the order, I think it is 
Bverv proper and weighty reason why it should 



be referred to our legal adviser. I have no ex- 
perience in this body and do not know what may 
be the usual custom ; but it seems to me we can- 
not be too cautious about setting an example of 
breaking laws which it is our duty to enforce. If 
this is illegal, because it has been the custom for 
eight years is no reason why it should continue. 
[ think it is a good and weighty reason for stop- 
ping it now. I think the motion to table should 
prevail. 

Mr. Clarke of Ward 22— For the information of 
the gentleman last up, I would state, siy, that the 
City Auditor passes no bill but what he is perfect- 
ly satisfied, before he gives an order on the Treas- 
urer, that the bill is legal. The Auditor is in daily 
consultation with the City Solicitor ; he has here- 
tofore passed those bills and I am entirely satis- 
fied that it is legal. If gentlemen of the legal 
profession are not posted on the law I regret 
it exceedingly. 

Mr. Mowry — Permit me to say in this connection 
that several members have expressed the view 
that this matter is illegal; and, sir, if the statutes, 
either general or otherwise, are consulted in con- 
nection with this matter, I think it is difficult to 
find any provision which authorizes the Mayor to 
make this appointment. Several persons, whose 
opinions are entitled to weight, having expressed 
the opinion that this matter is illegal, I think 
there can be no harm in referring it to the Judi- 
ciary Committee to ascertain the opinion of the 
City Solicitor. 

The motion to table was declared lost. Mi'. 
Thompson doubted the vote, and called for the 
yeas and nays, which were ordered. The motion 
was lost— yeas 22, nays 44: 

Yeas— Messrs. Barnarci, Barry, Blodgett, Brown, 
Coe, Crocker, Danforth, Felt, Ham, Hibbard, 
Mowry, Perham, J. H, Pierce, O. H. Pierce, Pratt, 
J. B. Richardson, Roberts, Sampson, Thompson, 
Upham, Warren, Wolcott— 22. 

Nays— Messrs. Blanchard, Brintnall, Burke, 
Cannon, Clarke, Cox, Cross, Day, Dee, Doherty, 
Duggan, Fagan, D. A. Flynn, J. J. Flynn, Fraser, 
Hiscock, Jackson, Kelley (Ward 3), Kelley (Ward 
6), Kidney, Loughlin, McClusky, McDonald, Mc- 
Garagle, Morrill, Mullane, Nugent, O'Connor, 
O'Donnell, Pearl, Pope, Reed, Roach, Ruffin, Sib- 
ley, Smardon, Souther, Spenceley, Stone, Thorn- 
dike, Vose, E. R. Webster, G. B. Webster, Wilbur 
—44. 

ADsent or not voting — Messrs. Beechiug, Fer- 
nald, Howes, M. W. Richardson, Shepard— 5. 

The question was on the passage of the order. 

Mr. Pratt of Ward 21—1 move to amend the or- 
der by inserting after the word "badges," the 
words, "and also suitable clubs." The gentlemen 
smile, Mr. President, but have not I stood under 
the lamp posts, on a starry night, when the gas- 
lights were emitting their beneficent light, and 
longed to be a noliceman ? 

"I want to be a 'special,' 

And wth the police stand, 
A badge upon my buttoned coat, 

And a 'billy' in my hand." 

Sir, at a critical period in my life I was denied 
the privilege of bearing the name of that great 
and good statesman, George Washington; but, 
like him, I have a future before me, and I cannot 
lie. I have often envied the cap, uniform, brass 
buttons and the other accoutrements which go to 
make up the dignity of that official with which we 
are so familiar — the policeman ; but I did not ex- 
pect when I became a member of this Council 
that I should so soon have offered to me this 
longed-for pleasure. There is only one thing want- 
ed. God never sent a man into this world with the 
badge of divinity in his face without at the same 
time giving him a weapon of defence in a clench- 
ed fist. Who ever heard of sending a soldier into 
the field without a weapon ? And what would a 
policeman be without a, "billy" ? What should we 
do, Mr. President, scattered from this hall at a late 
hour of the night, and proceeding towards Cragie's 
Bridge, to Mattapan, to Bunker Hill, and to the 
remotest (jonfines of Ward 25, defenceless and 
alone? Sir, without a club we are nothing; with 
it, we may be heroes. Give me that and I will sing 
or sigh— 

"There, right before the Mayor, 
,So glorious and so bright, 

I '11 show my badge and 'billy,' 
And whistle day and night." 
[Applause and laughter in the galleries, which 
the President peremptorily checked.] 

The amendment was declared adopted. Mr. 
McGaragle doubted the vote, and on motion of 
Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19 the yeas and nays were 



24. 



COMMON OOUISJ^OIL 



ordered. The amendment was lost — yeas 16 > 
nays 50: 

Yeas— Messrs. Blodg,ett, Crocker, Danforth,Felt, 
Hibbard, Hiscock, Howes, Morrill, Mowry, J. H. 
Pierce, O. H. Pierce, Pratt, J. B. Richardson, 
Sampson, Smardon, Thompson — 16. 

Nays — Messrs. Barnard, Barry, Blanchai'd, Brint- 
nall. Brown, Burke, Cannon, Clarke, Coe, Cross, 
Day, Dee, Doherty, Dtigean, Fagan, D. A. 
Flynn, J. J. Flynn, Fraser, Ham, Jackson, 
Kellej (Ward 3), Kelley (Ward 6), Kidney, 
Loughlin, McClusky, McDonald, McGaragle, 
Mullane, Nugent, O'Connor, O'Donnell, Pearl, 
Perham, Pope, Reed, Roach, Roberts, Ruffin, Sib- 
ley, Souther, Speuceley, Stone, Tliorndike, Up- 
ham, Vose, Warren, E. R. Webster, G. B. Web- 
ster, Wilbur, Wolcott— 50. 

Absent or not voting — Messrs. Beeching, Cox, 
Fernald, M. W. Richardson, Shepard— 5. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 9— In years past it has been 
the. custom to limit this order to the providing of 
badges for those gentlemen who wish to have 
them, and it seems desirable and reasonable that 
we should limit it in the same way this year. 
There seems to be no reason for spending the 
city's money for badges for members who 
do not want them, either for the rea- 
son that they will not feel able to do 
justice to the badge without a billy, or for 
any other reason. I therefore move to amend the 
order by striking out "for the same" and substi- 
tuting '"'for such members of the Council as may 
make applicatiomtherefor." 

Mr. Ruffin of AVard 9— We have now commenced 
the annual wrangle over this badge question. We 
always have it, and it always results in one way — 
the badges are ultimately procured. Last year 
the opposition to it was based upon retrenchment 
and reform ; it was said to be a wasteful and use- 
less expenditure of money. Those who were ur- 
gent in pressing that view of the case soon ceased 
their talk of retrenchment and reform, and 
it turned into a farce and by-word. Those who 
were loudest in talking of retrenchment soon 
stopped and we heard nothing more of it. Upon 
this qviestion of a badge I feel like this : I have one 
anddon'tneed another; there are many members 
of this Council who are new members," who have 
no badges and desire them. I think they ought to 
have them. I stand here to say that any member 
wishing a badge ought to have" it. It is nothing- 
more than proper that when a member 
retires from this hall he should have 
some memento for his children, for his 
badge is proof that he has been here. It is a me- 
mento connected with pleasant recollections; and 
taking that view I shall vote for the order as 
amended by the gentleman from Ward 9 [Mr. 
Crocker]. Why, sir, we have badges in very many 
conditions and positions in this lite. I remember 
that your honorable committee, appointed last 
July, who were on duty at Music Hall, had 
a proper badge. Nobody objected to it ; 
it was thought very proper. It is some- 
thing which has always been done, so far 
as I know, by committees and larger bodies. At 
the great Peace Festival you had a committee 
with badges; and ijeople who went to the Centen- 
nial wanted a memento of their having been there 
— some little pin, or something of that kind. You 
may call it a weakness of human nature, but it 
has always been so. I consider it a desirable 
thing to have. You may treat it with ridicule, 
but still I think it ought to pass, and I think it 
will. 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 5—1 hope the amendment of 
the gentleman from Ward 9 will prevail, and I 
move to amend the amendment by adding "the 
cost not to exceed five dollars for each badge." 

Mr. Howes of Ward 18—1 trust that the order as 
amended will pass. I do not expect to get a badge 
myself, and I do not want one. I have opposed 
them for the past two years, but I have found that 
usually we get into a very great row on the 
first of the year on this badge question, and it 
makes divisions in feeling among members that 
last a very long time ; and in votes that' are taken 
hereafter on matters of much greater importance, 
the feeling that has survived from the badge 
question shows itself, and influences members in 
their votes, by the side of which the sum spent in 
badges amounts to nothing at all. On that ac- 
count, although I should add the "billy," if nec- 
essary, I hope the order will pass. 

Mr. Crocker accepted Mr. Sibley's amendment. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17 — I have no objection to 
those members having badges who desire them. 
Many of the gentlemen here were elected with a 



large word, "reform," upon the ticket, but, as the 
gentleman from Ward 9 [Mr. Ruffin] has said, it 
seems to be dying out, as it did last year. The 
Mayor has told us we ought to retrench, and I 
suppose that most of us here wish to carry out his 
ideas. 1 want to do so; I am willing to do so. 
and lighten the liurdens of the taxpayers. Now, 
sir, it seems to me to be inconsistent. When we 
have appointed a committee to reduce the sala- 
ries of heads of departments, clerks, laborers, 
gentlemen here ought to be willing to give up 
some of their perquisites, and not be like 
Artemus Ward— willing that all his wife's relar 
tions should go to the war. It gentlemen 
want badges they should have them at 
their own expense, and I should like to 
offer an amendment of that kind. I un- 
derstand that the Aldermen desiring a badge 
have provided one at their own expense, and it 
seems to me that, if they want it, gentlemen of 
this Council ought to do the same. I move to 
strike out that part of the order charging the 
expense to the Contingent Fund and limiting the 
cost of each badge to five dollars. 

Mr. Ruffin— I hope this amendment will not pre- 
vail. It seems to be a penny-wise policy, if I 
understand the amendment correctly. I see 
no sreater reason why we should not have 
these badges than why we should not have the 
pocketbook and diary which is usually given to 
each member of this Council. I suppose they are 
in the same category. It is a useful thing, and, 
as I said just now, it is a desirable thing. These 
are the little perquisites that come to a mem- 
ber of the Common Council. It seems to 
me we are straining at a gnat, and we 
may swallow a camel after awhile. If we 
are going to practise reform and retrench- 
ment, let us do it on something substantial, and 
not on something where the amount pending is a 
mere bagatelle. Let us strike higher than that. 
There will come a time, a'nd very soon, when gen- 
tlemen who preach retrenchment and reform will 
have an opportunity to carry out their views. But 
on such a small matter as this it does not in- 
dicate any desire for retrenchment and reform by 
voting against this order. I hope we shall vote down 
this last amendment and pass the order as amend- 
ed by the gentleman from Ward 9, because I think 
the sooner we get rid of this matter the better. It 
is likely to hang along for some time, with these 
various amendments offered — some in the spirit of 
fun and some for delay. The sooner we get at the 
meat of this matter the better. It is just what we 
have had before, and it is merely to gain time. 

Mr. Sampson— The gentleman [Mr. Ruffin] says 
we shall soon have an opportunity to show wheth- 
er we are in favor of retrenchment or not. I think 
we have one now. I have been brought up to think 
that if you take care of the pennies the pounds 
will take care of themselves. Here is an oppor- 
tunity for gentlemen to favor retrenchment in a 
useless expenditure. It is not a matter of utility; 
it is simply a matter of vanity. Are we will- 
ing to forego it ? If so let us follow the example 
of the other Board. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 13— This is a matter of only 
$300. I think the members will require badges". 
Perhaps the gentleman [Mr. Sampson] who was 
on the Improved Sewerage Committee will need 
some loaking after, and perhaps the members will 
like to go round and see what work is being done. 
I hope the order will pass. 

Mr. Sampson's amendment was lost. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 10— This is a difficult 
question to talk about, because, you know, it is a 
question of taste; and we have the authority of 
an old adage that questions of taste are not to 
be disputed about, especially in matters of per- 
sonal dress and ornamentation. Mr. Bayard 
Taylor, the great traveller, states that on a 
line Sunday morning, as he was attending church 
in one of the East India islands, just as the ser- 
vice commenced there stepped into the door a 
princess of the royal family, who marched up the 
broad aisle and took her seat in front of the 
preacher. ' She was proud and majestic. He 
says, further along, that her entire costume was a 
straw hat and a. fan, and he proceeds to remark, by 
way of showing the difference of taste in indi- 
viduals, that although that costume was regal at 
that time and place, it would hardly have been 
thought the fashion for Queen Victoria in St. 
George's Chapel. And this illustrates the differ- 
ence of taste in different individuals. In using 
this illustration I do not mean to throw out the ap- 
prehension that however beautiful badges our mes- 
senger will get, there will be any danger oi any of 



JANUARY ^5 



1H77 



us appealing in public witli nothing on but a hat 
and badge, however large and costly it may be. 
.And yet, sir, if we are going to make the city pay 
for something to wear, if it is thought necessary to 
conform to the custom established by a 
long line of illustrious predecessors who 
have held these seats, it seems to me we 
might as well procure something useful. "SVe 
might as well have a pair of pantaloons or an over- 
coat; or if gentlemen have provided themselves 
with those articles for winter, they might as well 
do as the East India princess did— have a straw hat 
and fan for summer. I had hoped that if gentle- 
men came here to distinguish themselves, it 
might be by some mark different from a brass 
button; that it might be by some intel- 
lectual achievement for the benefit of the citizens, 
the adoption of some plan for dispensing useful 
knowledge among the people, for aiding the poor, 
or in the reduction of taxes. It seems to me, sir, 
that a record of that sort, with our appreciating 
citizens, would be a better mark for public officers 
or the trustees of city affairs, than the trifle or 
bauble vvhich we are talking about. I think 
we had better try and see if we 
cannot do something that will make a better mon- 
ument of our official lives than a two-penny brass 
button ; and if we cannot, and if there are any 
gentlemen here who, when our official year is end- 
ed, if when the summer is gone and the harvest 
ended, they find they have not done anything to 
make a record of that sort, in order that they may 
hand down something to a grateful and ad- 
miring posterity, I will put my hand in 
my pocket and contribute for it. But we 
wul wait and see if we cannot do some- 
thing for it. But that is only one branch of the 
question. The other is that we shall be appointed 
policemen. That is largely a question of taste, and 
difficult to talk about. Well, Mr. President, some 
men are born great, and some have greatness 
thrust iipon them. I do not wish to undervalue 
the majesty or dignity or grandeur or value of 
that officer" whose true and usual emblems are 
a pair ot handcuffs and a billy ; but, 
for myself, I do not want to be a po- 
liceman, even as much dignity and power as it 
might bring, and I fear the Mayor would not ap- 
point me, as he knows I am not fit for duty. The 
question of its legality has been raised. Now, Mr. 
President,! have rccici, I believe, the Bill of Rights 
and the Constitution of Massachusetts; I have 
read all the statutes, with the supplements and 
the notes; and 1 have also read, by the kind- 
ness of the City Messenger (whose courtesy never 
fails) Washington's Farewell Address, and I do not 
find any authority in any of those ancient and 
respectable documents for the appointment of one 
branch of the Government to fulfill and perform 
the duties of the other branch. I had somehow 
got it in my head from reading some old docu- 
ment, that it was not quite the thing for the leg- 
islative branch of the Government to assume the 
performance of executive duties, i should think 
this would be very much like the Legislature 
of Massachusetts passing a stringent prohibitory 
law, and then voting themselves governor and 
State constables to enforce it. I myself do not 
quite see the distinction, I do not » wish, after 
voting here for an ordinance creating, possibly, a 
penal offence, to go out and enforce it upon my 
neighbors, and I do not believe we ought to be al- 
lowed or bound to do it. I am not certain that 
there is n't something in that point, viz., that 
no man should combine in himself the functions 
of two of the branches of the same pdwer. In my 
opinion there is some respectable authority for 
that maxim. I regret to hear that the dissussion 
of this question creates dissensions. I should not 
speak or vote upon it if I thought it-would create 
dissension, or feel that it would prevent our use- 
fulness hereafter. It is a question th^t is fought 
every year, and why? Because many members of 
the Council believe that it is a foolish and vain 
thing; and I think that the whole thing had 
better be dropped— voted down. There are those 
who will not take them, Avho will not submit to be 
appointed. That of itself creates a division which 
should be deprecated, and which must inevitably 
result in a diminurion of usefulness. Therefore,*! 
move an indefinite postponement of this whole 
subject. 

The President— The Chair rules the motion out 
of order, the motion to amend taking precedence. 

Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19—1 did not design say- 
ing a single word upon badges this year; I think 
I had my say last year, and I should have re- 
mained silent but for the flowei-y effusions we 



have had upon badges and the assertion that mem- 
bers lay this up to their hearts and bring it out 
upon other occasions, which seeins to me to be au 
insult to this Council. After the historical nar- 
rations and poetry we have heard it seems to me 
that if we go on much further the cost of pub- 
lishing the discussion will be more than the cost 
of the badges. I move the previous question. 

Mr. Thompson — Will the gentleman withdraw 
the motion till I can off'er an amendment which I 
should like to make to the order? 

Mr. Spenceley — I think we have gone far enough. 
I decline to withdraw. 

The main question was ordered. 

Mr. Crocker's amendment (as amended by Mr. 
Sibley) was adopted. 

Mr. Felt called for the yeas and nays on the 
passage of the order. Declared lost. 

Mr. Webster of Ward 3—1 doubt the vote. I 
want to go on record as against badges. I voted 
against laying on the table because I wanted it 
decided immediately ; but on the final question I 
want to go upon record, and not be misunder- 
stood. I think that others here have the same 
feeling. 

The yeas and nays were ordered— 1.5 for, 41 
against ; and the order was passed — yeas 43, nays 
18: 

Yeas— Messrs. Barnard, Barry, Brintnall, Burke, 
Cannon, Clarke, Dee, Doherty, Duggan, Fagan, 

D. A. Flynn, J. J. Flynn, Fraser, Ham, Howes, 
Jackson, Kelley (Ward 3), Kelley (Ward 6), Kid- 
ney, Loughlin, McClusky, McDonald, McGaragle, 
Morrill, Mullane, Nugent, O'Connor, O'Donnell, 
Pearl, Perham, Pope, Roach, Ruffin, Sibley, Smar- 
don, Spenceley, Stone, Thorndike, Vose, Warren, 

E. R. Webster, Wilbur— 43. 

Nays — Messrs. Blodgett, Brown, Crocker, Cross, 
Danf orth. Day, Felt, Hibbard, Mowry, J. H. Pierce, 
O. H. Pierce, Pratt, J. B. Richardson, Roberts, 
Thompson, Upham, G. B. Webster, Wolcott— 18. 

Absent or not voting — Messrs. Beeching, Blan- 
chard, Coe, Cox, Fernald, Hiscock, Reed, M. W. 
Richardson, Sampson, Shepard,JSouther — 11. 

The President appointed Messrs. McGaragle of 
Ward 8, Perham of Ward 23, and Ivelley of Ward 
6, as said committee. 

The rule was suspended on motion of Mr. Mc- 
Garagle, who then moved a reconsideration, hop- 
ing it would [not prevail. The reconsideration 
was lost. 

PETITIONS PRESE>'TED. 

By Mr. Smardon of Ward 10— Petition of Robert 
T. Paine, Jr., for abatement of assessment for re- 
moval of a nuisance on Greenwich street. Re- 
ferred to Joint Committee on Health. Sent up. 

Petition of Eugene Geary, to be compensated for 
injuries received on corner Shawmut avenue and 
Mechanic street. Referred to Joint Committee 
on Claims. Sent up. 

Petition of Dennis J. Holland to be appointed 
Superintedent of Dover-street Bridge. Referred to 
Committee to Nominate Superintendents of 
Bridges. Sent uo. 

By Mr. Wolcott of Ward 11— Petition of S. H. 
Russell, trustee, for an abatement of betterment 
assessment on Congress and Federal streets. 
Sent up. 

By Mr. Barry of Ward 22— Petition of Thomas 
Malone et aZ., that Whitney street be put in order. 
Sent up. 

By Mr. Pierce of Ward 24— Petition of S. P. 
Dexter e< al., for a new fire alarm box in Ward 24. 
Referred to Committee on Fire Department. Sent 
up. 

A QUESTION OF PRIVILEGE. 

Mr. Clarke of Ward 22—1 rise to a question of 
privilege. I wish to make a personal explanation. 
At the last meeting of the Council, in my remarks 
upon the appointment ot the Salary Committee, I 
found the next evening that I was reported in 
the Transcript as saying these words : 

"And it will be a most disgraceful thing for any 
gentleman to be on the Salary Committee." 

Now, sir, the words that I did state that evening 
were these : 

"It is a very disagreeable position for any gen- 
tleman to be on the Salary Committee." 

It is a vast difference between the word dis- 
graceful and disasreeable. It has been corrected 
in the Journal of ttie Council, but I make this 
statement pre.suming that there are gentlemen 
here tonight who was absent on the last evening, 
and might have read the statement as reported. 

DISPOSITIOK OF TOPICS IN THE MAYOR'S AD- 
DRESS. 

Mr. Flynn of W^ard 13 submitted a report from 
the joint special committee to consider what dis- 



36 



COMMON OOUISrClL 



position should be made of the several topics in 
the Mayor's address, recommending the passage 
of the following : 

Ordered, That so much of tlie Mayor's Address 
as relates to sewerage be referred "to the Joint 
Special Committee on Improved Sewerage. That 
so much of the Mayor's address as relates to parks 
be referred to the Joint Standing Committee on 
Common and Public Grounds. 

That so much of the Mayor's Address as relates 
to the city charter be referred to the Joijit St^nd- 
ing Committee on Ordinances, and that they be 
requested to consider the expediency of obtain- 
ing the necessary authority to enable the City 
Council to provide by ordinance for the creation 
of boards of commissioners, with authority, when 
they deem it for the public interest, to take from 
such boards any powers previously givenj or to 
abolish them entirely. 

That so much of the Mayor's Address as relates 
to tax valuation be referred to the Joint Special 
Committee on the Reduction of Municipal Ex- 
penses. 

Ordered, That so much of the Mayor's Address 
as relates to the Police Department be referred to 
the Committee on Police on the part of the Board 
of Aldermen. 

The question was on giving the first order a 
second reading. 

Mr. Howes of Ward 18— One of the orders re 
fers the matter of parks to the Standing Commit- 
tee on Common and Public Grounds. This is a 
highly important matter, and one which I think 
the Committee on Common is unequal to coping 
with on account of its other duties. The matter 
was under discussion at a meeting of the com- 
mittee yesterday, and I may say I was authorized 
to state that if a joint special committee could 
be appointed to take that subject under consider- 
ation,' they would consider it as a favor, relieving 
them from duties which they were afraid, in the 
multiplicity of other things pressing upon them, 
that they would not be able to give that atten- 
tion vhich they deserved. I therefore offer that 
amei Iment to the order. 

Mr. iTlynn of Ward 1,3— The committee consid- 
ered that matter thoroughly, and they somewhat 
differed in relation to that particular question. 
But as a matter of courtesy to the Committee on 
Common, who had the matter in charge last year, 
they thought it their duty to refer the matter to 
the same committee this year. I have no objec- 
tion, and I do not think the committee have, to 
referring it to a special committee. 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8— AVhat number will 
compose this joint special committee? 

Mr. Howes— The regular number, I suppose — 
three Aldermen and five Common Councilmen. 

The President — The committee would be com- 
posed of five on the part of the Council, with such 
as the Aldermen may join. 

Mr. Howes— I think it would be better to have a 
committee of three on the part of this branch. 
The subject is one which the committee have got 
to consider very carefully and give a good deal of 
time to. A committee of five will be able to meet 
oftener and have quorvims, and go through what is 
necessary, more effectively than would a larger 
committee. It is, of course, for this Council to 
decide. I move to make the committee three on 
the part of the Council. 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8— Are the Park Com- 
missioners to act in concert with this committee? 
If not, I think the committee is too small. 

Mr. Howes— They will act toward the Park Com- 
missioners as the committees on Health and Fire 
Department do toward those boards. They are 
the representatives of those commissions in the 
City Council, and on that account would not have 
as much detailed work as the Committee on Com- 
mon would. 

Mr. Howes's amendment was adopted, and the 
first order was read a second time and passed. 
Subsequently the President announced the follow- 
ing as the special committees on the part of the 
Council named therein : 

On Improved Sewerage— Messrs. Sampson of 
Ward 17, Pierce of Ward 24, Blodgett of Ward 8. 

On Public Parks— Messrs. Thompson of Ward 9, 
Stone of Ward 3, Coe of Ward 23. 

Sent up. 

BATES OF TOLL ON EAST BOSTON FERRIES. 

Mr. Burke of Ward 2 offered an order. That the 
Committee on Ordinances be requested to con- 
sider the expediency of so amending the ordi- 
nance in relation to the East Boston ferries as to 
remove the restrictions which require that the 



rates of toll established by the City Council shall 
be based upon an income sufficient to cover the 
current exjjenses of maintaining the ferries, pay- 
ment of interest, etc. Sent up for concurrence. 

The order was read a second time. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 9 — It seems to me that it is 
hardly proper to refer that matter to the Commit- 
tee on Ordinances, and that the Committee on 
East Boston Ferries should consider the expedi- 
ency of passing such an ordinance. 

Mr. Burke ot'Ward 2— This is to amend the ordi- 
nance in relation to tolls on the East Boston fer- 
ries, and I think the proper reference would be to 
refer it to the Committee on Ordinances before 
the ordinance is changed. 

Mr. Crocker — My point is that the <iuestion of 
the expediency of making this change — whetherit 
is advisable or not — is a matter that relates to the 
management of the ferries, and should properly 
go to the Committee on East Boston Ferries. The 
business of the Committee on Ordinances is to see 
that ordinances, which it is determined should be 
passed, are in proper shape. All changes in ordi- 
nances should go to the Committee on Ordinances 
before they are adopted; but it seems to me that 
the question of the expediency of making the 
change is one that belongs to the Committee on 
East Boston Ferries. I move that this order be 
amended so as to refer it to the Committee on 
Ferries. 

Mr. Crocker's amendment was adopted, and, as 
amended, the order was passed. Sent up. 

SUPPLIES FOR HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 5 offered an order, That the 
Superintendent of Health be authorized during 
the present municipal year to make contracts, 
subject to the supervisiop of the Committee on 
Health, for the purchase of such quantities of 
hay or grain, and for such horses and exchanges 
as his department may from time to time require ; 
also for such material as shall be required for the 
use of his department. Ordered to a second 
reading. 

SUPPLIES FOR CITY ENGINEER'S DEPARTMENT. 

Mr. Thorndike of Ward 2 offered an order. That 
the City Engineer be authorized, with the ap- 
proval of the Joint Standing Committee on the 
City Engineer's Department, to make such i3ur- 
chases of supplies. Instruments and drawing ma- 
terials, and to incur such other expenses, as may 
be necessary for that department during the pres- 
ent municipal year. Ordered to a second reading. 

SECOND ELEVATOR FOR CITY HALL. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 9 offered an order, That 
the Joint Standing Committee on Public Buildings 
be instructed to consider and report upon the ex- 
pediency of placing a second iiassenger elevator 
in City Hall. Read twice and passed. Sent up. 

MANAGEMENT OF' SINKING FUNDS AND CITY 
DEBT. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 9 offered an order, That his 
Honor the Mayor be requested to petition the 
Legislature at its present session for the passage 
of an act authorizing the City Council to provide 
by ordinance for the cancellation of any bonds of 
the city which may at any time be held by the 
Sinking Fund Commissioners, so far as such can- 
cellation may be consistent with the obligations 
which the city may have assumed toward the 
holders of its bonds. 

The question was on giving the order a second 
reading. 

Mr. Crocker— I suppose I ought to say a few 
words in explanation of that order. The fact is 
probably well known — at any rate to all the old 
members of the Council, if not to the new ones — 
that the Sinking Fund Commissioners hold 
the bonds of the city to an amount some- 
thing like fifteen millions of dollars. They hold 
them as part of the sinking funds, and the city is 
all the time going through the formality of pay- 
ing to itself the interest on those bonds," and lay- 
ing that interest aside towards the payment of 
the city debt. Now, it is evident that it 
will be a much more simple manner of 
managing city affairs if, when any money is raised 
towards the p"ayment of the city debt, it should be 
applied directly toward paying off and cancelling 
the debt, rather than going through the formality 
of paying the money to the commission- 
ers for them to buy up the debt and keep it 
alive. One result of the present system is that the 
city is made to appear as owing a much larger 
debt than it really owes. It appears to owe a debt 
of .?44,000,000, when it only owes ¥i28,000,000 
— those are nearly the figures, I think — 



« 



JANURAY 18, 1876 



27 



some $15,000,000 of our deot being held by 
the city itself. It is a matter of doubt whetner 
the city might not provide by ordinance for this 
change ; but there is doubt on the subject, and it 
seems to me we should ask the Legislature for un- 
doubted authority to cancel these bonds. This 
whole matter of the sinking funds was up last 
year, and certain changes were proposed which 
were not acceptable to the Council, Mr. Peabody, 
a mfember from Ward 11, and one of the Sinking 
Fund Commissioners, opposing the change. But I 
may mention that that gentleman, who took a lead- 
ing part in opposing the change introduced last 
year.is in favor of this proposition providing for the 
cancellation of the bonds. Since his connection 
with the Sinking Fund Commission ceased, Mr. 
Peabody has sent a communication to that body 
proposing that some provision should be made for 
the cancellation of the city bonds held by the Sink- 
ing Fund Commissioners, but his communication 
was overlooked at the last meeting of the commis- 
sioners, and, therefore, has not yet been presented 
to that board. I think that if the matter is care- 
fully looked into by anybody he will find that this 
proposed change is in every way a reasonable thing, 
which will tend to simplify this matter of the 
sinking funds, which probably not half a dozen 
people in the city understand, and that it will 
tend to make our city finances more intelligible 
than they are today. It certainly is desirable that 
the Sinning Fund should be more intelligible; 
that we should know what it is, and that we 
should know what the money that goes into 
it is used for. Another reason is this : I believe we 
have been paying into the sinking funds for the 
past few years more money than there is any rea- 
son for paying. Our late Mayor, in his closing re- 
marks to the Board of Aldermen, stated that dur- 
ing the three years of his administration we had 
paid into the sinking funds, on account of the city 
debt, over seven and a half million dollars; that 
we had borrowed some seven millions for new 
loans, including four millions for bringing 
in the Sudbury water; and that notwith- 
standing all that borrowing, we had de- 
creased the net debt of the city during the three 
years over half a million of dollars. If it had 
not been for the extraordinary expense of bring- 
ing in the Sudbury water, we should have decreas- 
ed our city debt by taxation out of the pockets of 
the people, in these hard times, over four mil- 
lions and a half of dollars. Now, it seems 
ro me that this is an unreasonable way 
for us to be taxing our citizens in these 
hard times ; and that it is unnecessary at the 
present time to use such means to pay off and re- 
duce the debt of the city. It is no time to make 
extraordinary exertions to reduce the debt of the 
city. Our present Mayor, in his inaugural ad- 
dress, said he had been informed, by those 
supposed to know, that if we went on at 
the rate we are going, we should pay 
the whole of our debt in seven vears. He did not 
pretend to understand how it was to be done ; but 
it was by this mysterious Sinking Fund, that he 
did not understand, that it was to be paid in seven 
years. Now, I claim that if we are going to re- 
lieve the burdens of the taxpayers we can stop 
this unnecessary paying of immense sums into the 
Sinking Fund every year. It was foolish for us, 
during the last three years, to pay the 
whole expense of Sudbury water, of the 
Swett and Beach street widenings, and several 
other improvements, and besides that to reduce 
our debt half a million. It seems to me there is 
no reason in it. What is going to be the result? 
I admit that it is, prima facie, a good thing if the 
city can get out of debt. But is it desirable, un- 
der our present circumstances, that we should 
burden ourselves with this extra burden of 
taxation, in these hard years, for the sake of 
getting the city of Boston out of debt. The city 
of Boston has been in debt for years, and I believe 
it is destined to continue to be in debt, other cities 
and towns abou^ us are likely to be in debt, and if 
we, by extraordinary exertions, free ourselves 
from debt in seven years, we shall leave a 
clear field for an extravagant or corrupt 
City Government that may come after us 
to incur a new debt foolishly or wasteful- 
ly. I believe it is not good economy for 
the city of Boston to go on as it has been doing, 
straining every nerve to get out of debt. I believe 
there is safety in letting the old debt run on for 
some time, and this order looks in that direc- 
tion. 
Besides, if we have our nominal debt fifteen or 



Sixteen millions more than it really is, we have to 
raise necessarily the interest on that amount 
yearly by taxation, which interest, at six 
per cent., is nearly a million of dollars. 

This amount we raise by taxation yearly, in 
these hard times, to pay the interest on debt that 
we hold ouvselves, and this interest is to be turned 
over and applied to hurrying us out of debt. It 
seems to me to be wholly unnecessary. For these 
reasons I have offered this order. If it takes its 
first reading tonight, I shall move that it be spe- 
cially assigned for the next meeting, as it is a sub- 
ject that oiight not to be passed over hurriedly. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17— The gentlenian's views 
in regard to the Sinking Funds are certainly very 
peculiar. He states that the citizens are taxed 
for the interest on the bonds of the city of Boston 
now held by the Sinking Fund Commission- 
ers. That is very true. They are taxed be- 
cause the statutes and ordinances require 
that a tax shall be levied every year — on 
a twenty-year loan, 31/2 percent.; on a ten- year 
loan, eight percent.; on a thirty-year loan, two 
per cent. Now the citizens are taxed no more on 
account of the bonds being in the bands of 
the Sinking Fund Commissioners than if 
they were in the hands of Baring Broth- 
ers, London. That taxation goes to make up 
the portion that the law requires. The gentleman 
knows that the Sinking Fund Commissioners are 
limited to investing in three kinds of securities- 
United States, city and State bonds. By an ordi- 
nance of the city of Boston the commissioners 
have the right to take bonds of the city at par, and 
therefore it is a better investment. The interest 
on those bonds, with the revenue from the un- 
expended appropriations at the end of the year, 
go to make up what the law requires shall be 
raised by taxation from the citizens. That tax is 
no more than if the bonds were held by outside 
parties. The Sinking Funds are so managed that 
when the debt matures the Sinking Fund pays it 
without any further taxation. The reason it has 
decreased so much within three years is because 
the debt has matured. We have not paid for 
Swett street or for Sudbury River; but we have 
paid for what our fathers" borrowed some thirty 
years ago. That this matter may receive proper 
consideration I move that the order be referred 
to the Committee on Finance. 

Mr. Crocker — This matter requires early atten- 
tion. If we are going to the Legislature this year, 
it is important that we should act at once. I move 
to amend the motion to refer by adding "with in- 
structions to report at as early a day as possible." 

Mr. Sampson— I accept the amendment. 

Mr. Crocker— I think the gentleman is decided- 
ly wrong in his information about the Sinking 
Funds. I said it was a difficult thing to under- 
stand, and I think the gentleman has not got as 
far toward understanding it as I have. He will 
find that the statements that I have made are cor- 
rect, and that it is necessary to raise by taxation 
the interest on the whole city debt, and he will 
find also that the fact that a portion of the old 
debt has been paid out of the Sinking Fund is no 
reason why the net debt of the city should be de- 
creased at all. The amount of the Sinking Fund 
is to be deducted from the gross debt in order to 
find the amount of the net debt. The application 
of a portion of the Sinking Fund to the payment 
of the debt does not, therefore, decrease the net 
debt at all and it is the net debt which has really 
been decreased, during the three years of Mayor 
Cobb's administration, half a million dollars, al- 
though we borrowed in that time over 
four millions for Sudbury water, an expen- 
diture which may well be deemed extraordinary, 
and which as it is expected to bring a revenue to 
the city, might well have caused an increase of 
our debt. Had it not been for that extraordinary 
addition to our debt we should have reduced our 
debt during the last three years substantially by 
taxation out of the pockets of the people, 
over four and a half millions. I claim 
that that is an unreasonable way of proceeding at 
the present time, and that some steps ought to be 
taken looking toward a change. If we cannot 
change it without the assistance of the 
Legislature — as I am inclined to think we 
cannot — I hope we shall ask the Legis- 
lature to help us out of it. As the law 
stands today, we must go on taxing ourselves in 
this way until we get wholly out of debt. I think 
the Legislature will see that it is unfair to compel 
the city of Boston to burden itself with this extra 
taxation in these hard times. 



28 



COMMON COUNCIL 



The order was referred to tlie Finance Commit- 
tee, with instructions to report as early as possi- 
ble. Sent up. 

PROPOSED DEPARTMENT FOR PURCHASE OF SUP- 
PLIES. 

Mr. Clarke of Ward 22 offered an order, That the 
joint special committee to investigate and report 
what reduction can be made in salaries and clerk 
hire, and whether any departments can be abol- 
ished or consolidated, be requested to consider the 
expediency of establishing a "department for the 
purchase of supplies" for any or all the depart- 



ments of the City Government. Read twice and 
passed. Sent up. 

DOCUMENTS FOR SOCIAL LAW LIBRARY. 

Mr. Pratt of Ward 21 offered an order. That the 
Joint Standing Committee on Printing be request- 
ed to furnish the proprietors of the Social Law 
Library, for the use of said library, two copies of 
the revised ordinances of 1876, and also, as soon as 
possible, two copies of the supplements to the or- 
dinances. Read twice and passed. Sentuj). 

Adjourned, on motion of Mr. Clarke of Ward 22. 



a9 



BOARU OF ALDERMEN, 



CITY OF BO STON, 

Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 

JANUARY 33, 1877. 



Regular meeting at four o'clock P. M., bis Ii.on 
or the Mayor presiding. 

EXECUTIVE NOMINATIONS. 

Constable— Ellery S. Ayer. 

Special Police Officers — Daniel Cowan, Howard 
Athenaeum ; Henry C. Gilford, Tabernacle and its 
vicinity; Warren B. Plympton, Pemberton square; 
Charles McLaughlin, Reform Club, East Boston; 
Samuel C. Potter, Rochester Hall, Roxbury. 

Severally confirraed. 

PETITIONS REFEKBED. 

To the Joint Committee on Public Lands. St. 
John's Universalist Parish, for correction of error 
in their deed of land; Henrietta T. Wolcott, for 
confirmation of title to estate on corner of East 
Dedham street and Harrison avenue. 

To the Joint Special Committee to Nominate 
Superintendents of Bridges. George A. J. Colgan, 
for appointment as Superintendent of Mr. Wash- 
ington-avenue Bridge. 

To the Joint Committee on Claims. William 
Shea, to be compensated for injury from defect in 
sidewalk in Ruggles street; Edward T. Spurr, to 
be compensated for personal injuries sustained by 
his wife from a fall on the sidewalk of No. 25 
Mead street; Dennis Mannahan, to be compen- 
sated for injuries sustained by a fall on the side- 
walk. 

To the Committee on Lamps. Robert A.. Mil- 
ler et al., that Green-street place, Ward 24, be 
lighted; Day, Collins & Co. et al., for leave to 
place one of Bartlett's lanterns on Bromfield 
street, in front of the church, at their own ex- 
pense. 

To The Committee on Police. M. E. Shorey, to 
project a plain lantern at No. II Cross street, with 
the ward "hotel" or "lodging" painted thereon. 

To the. Committee on Streets on the part of the 
Board. Samuel H. Russell, trustee, lor reappor- 
tionment of betterment assessed on Congress 
street. 

To the Committee on Health on the part of the 
Board. Petitions for leave to occupy stables by 
Francis C. Creber, new wooden, two horses, Den- 
nis street, Ward 20; Aaron D. Williams, new 
wooden, one horse, Hampden street. 

To the Joint Comm ittee on Assessors' Depart- 
ment. Glendon Company, that the tax as.sessed 
upon estate No. 4 Waldron park in 1873 be re- 
funded. 

To the Committee on Paving. Thomas Malo- 
ney et al., that Whitney street be put in order. 

Middlesex Railroad Company, for the right to 
construct tracks on Lincoln street, between Beach 
and Kneeland streets, thence through Kneeland 
and South streets to the Old Colony Railway De- 
pot, to connect with their present tracks in Lin- 
coln street; also for the right to connect by a 
curve track with the track of the South Boston 
Railroad at the corner of Lincoln and Beach 
streets. 

To the Committee on Bridges. Henry B.Rookes, 
for employment as master carpenter on bridges. 

To the Joint Committee on Ordinances. Michael 
F. Lynch, that the City Council consider the exjje- 
diency of consolidating the Sewer, Paving and 
Water departments under one management, and 
placing the care of the public grounds under the 
management of the Park Commissioners, and for 
a hearing on the petition. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Order for appointment of joint special commit- 
tee to resume all matters relating to a system of 
improved sewerage. Laid on the table, on motion 
of Alderman Clark. 

Order for Superintendent of Public Buildings, 
under the direction of the committee on that de- 
partment, to supply the necessary furniture for, 
and make repairs upon, the several high, gram- 
mar and primary schoolhouses. Passed. Sent 
down. 

Order for the Committee on County Buildings to 
make all needed repairs on the Court House and 
other county buildings. Passed. 

Order for the Committee on County Buildings 
to provide the necessary furniture for the Court 
House and other countv buildings. Passed. 

Order for the Superintendent of Public Build- 



ings, under the direction of the committee on 
that department, to provide the necessary furni- 
ture for the City Hall and the several engine 
houses and police stations. Passed. Sent down. 

Order for Superintendent of Streets to remove 
without delay any and all structures hereafter 
built into or upon the sidewalks of public streets, 
which incommode public travel. Passed. 

Order for Superintendent of Streets to grant 
permits to open the public streets where neces- 
sary, pursuant to the 10th and llth sections of 
the Ordinance on Streets. Passed. 

Order for Superintendent of Streets to number 
or renumber any street which may require the 
same. Passed. 

Order for Superintendent of Streets to contract, 
from time to time, for the purchase of horses, hay, 
grain and paving stones, etc. Passed. 

Order for Superintendent of Streets to lay cross- 
walks and pave gutters where Committee on Pav- 
ing think it necessary. Passed. 

Order for cSuperintendent of Streets to set edge- 
stones and pave sidewalks where abutters agree 
to pay one-halt the cost. Passed. 

Order for Superintendent of Streets to put 
fences on lines of open or unimproved lots where 
the public safety demands the same. Passed. 

PAPERS FROM THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Petitions were referred in concurrence. 

Report and orders referring the several topics of 
the Mayor's address to appropriate committees, 
among which are a Committee on Improved Sewer- 
age (Messrs. Sampson, Paine, Blodgett, Thorndike 
and Ham to be joined), and a Committee on Public 
Parks (Messrs. Thompson, Stone and Coe to be 
joined). Orders passed in concurrence. The 
Mayor said the committees named would be an- 
nounced at Jhe next meeting. 

Order (amended) for Committee on East Boston 
Ferries to consider the subject of amending the 
East Boston Ferry ordinance, so that tolls shall be 
based on the cost of running the terries. Passed 
in concurrence. 

An order proposing a petition for an act to 
authorize the cancellation of city bonds by the 
Sinking Fund Commissioners came up referred 
to the Committee on Finance. Concurred. 

Order for Committee on Reduction of Expenses 
to consider the subject of establishing a depart- 
ment of supplies, etc. Passed in concurrence. 

Order for Committee on Public Buildings to con- 
sider the expediency of furnishing a second ele- 
vator for the Citj Hall. Passed iiT concurrence. 

ELECTIONS. 

Trustees of Public Library. A report came up 
nominating Alderman Clai-k and Common Coun- 
cilmen Howes and R. Pope as Trustees of Public 
Library, with certificates of election of John T. 
Clark, Richard Pope and Charles H. Reed as 
Trustees of the Public Library. 

The report was accepted in concurrence. 

Alderman Thompson — I wish to state that I 
was a member of the committee appointed to 
nominate Trustees of the Public Library, and I 
was a member of the Standing Committee on 
the Public Library last year. Consequently I took 
a special interest in the selection of candidates, 
on the part of the City Council, for that position. 
Every member of the City Council nominated re- 
ceived the unanimous vote of the committee, who 
felt quite satisfied with the result of their delib- 
erations. Their nominees, as a whole, ^lere 
not sustained by the Common Council, 
in consequence of the misconstruction of 
a letter written by Mr. Howes. I say miscon- 
struction, Mr. Chairman, from the fact of my ac- 
quaintance with Mr. Howes. I have been asso- 
ciated with him during the past year on one of 
the most important committees of the City Coun- 
cil, and I feel perfectly justified in saying that 
the meaning of the letter written by him, as it ap- 
peared in the public prints, was misconstrued; 
and I trust that the board will unanimously sus- 
tain the nominations of the committee. 1 hope 
that it will be done as an act of justice to an effi- 
cient and valuable member of the City Council. I 
would also state, that Mr. Howes has been return- 
ed for the third time by the unanimous vote of his 
constituents — both Democrats and Republicans 
voting for him. 1 move that the Board now pro- 
ceed to a ballot. 

An election was ordered. Committee— Aldermen 
Wilder and Breck. 

Whole number of votes 11 

Necessary to a choice 6 

Alderman John T. Clark 10 

Councilman R. Pope 11 

Councilman O. Howes, Jr 11 



JANUIiAY 32 



1877 



30 



And Messrs. Clark and Pope were declared elected 
in conc\irrence. and JVIr. Howes in non-concur- 
rence. Sent down. 

Directors of East Boston Fen'ies. A report 
came up nominating Alderman Breck and Com- 
mon Councilmen Edward Pearl and J. A. Duggan 
as Directors of East Boston Ferries, with certifi- 
cate of election of Alderman Breck and Messrs. 
Pearl and Duggan as Directors of East Boston 
Ferries. 

The report was accepted in concurrence. An 
election was ordered. Committee — Aldermen 
Wilder and Breck. 

Whole number of votes 11 

Necessary to a choice 6 

Alderman C. H. B. Breck 10 

Councihnan Edward Pearl 11 

Councilman John A. Duggau 10 

Councilman Phinehas J. Stone, Jr 1 

And Messrs. Breck, Pearl and Duggan were de- 
clared elected in concurrence. 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

The annual report of the Sealer of Weights and 
Measures (City Doc. 6) was received. Sent down. 

There have been expended during the year 
§4591.88; received for adjusting and sealing, 
$510.57; balance to be collected i28?.99; 1601 scales 
have been tested. 

BOSTON AND CAMBRIDGE BRIDGES. 

The annual report of the commissioner on 
bridges between Boston and Cambridge (City Doc. 
12) was received. Sent down. 

The West Boston Bridge draw was opened 2048 
times during the year; the Canal Bridge 2748 
times, antl the Prison Point Bridge 419. The ex- 
penses of the West Boston and Canal bridges were 
$7035.39, and the rebuilding of Prison Point Bridge 
cost $6406.26. 

SURVEY AND INSPECTION OF BUILDINGS. 

The annual report of the Inspector of Buildings 
(City Doc. 11) was received. Sent down. 

The report summarizes the general duties of the 
Inspector as laid down by statutes and ordinances, 
and then cites the act for the better protection of 
life in buildings occupied for public purposes in 
Boston. It then proceeds — 

Immediately upon the passage of this act I 
caused a thorough reexamination to be made of 
all the public schoolhouses in the city, and, by a 
special communication, officially called the atten- 
tion of the City Council to the condition of certain 
public buildings that were unsafe in the matter of 
egress and from fire. The buildings referred to 
were some of our public schoolhouses, and their 
IJresent position is substantially the same as when 
first reported to you. I would, therefore, again 
respectfully call your attention to the matter. 
The Brooklyn calamity was the occasion of the 
department making another examination, and in 
a more thorough manner than had ever heretofore 
been attempted, and, for the time being, the en- 
tire force of the department was placed upon 
their inspection. 

In these examinations, in the matter of egress, 
I have avoided hasty action, and such requisitions 
have been issued as appeared to be necessary af- 
ter a careful survey of the condition and capaci- 
ties of the premises, especial attention being- 
given to utilizing to their utmost extent existing 
and available resources before requiring new and 
radical ones, and that the alterations required 
should not affect the strength of the building, and 
that, when completed, the resulting benefits 
would commend themselves alike to the owners as 
well as to the public. No requirement has been 
made upon any building in excess of contingent 
exigencies, but where radical alterations were 
found to be necessary no hesitation was exhibited 
in requiring them to their fullest extent. 

In the matter of appliances for the extinguish- 
ment of fire there is no excuse whatever for their 
absence, and any neglect or I'efusal to provide the 
most complete and speedy methods for this pur- 
pose, particularly in view of the occupancy of 
buildings not especially designed and planned 
with reference to the furnishing of facilities of 
egress, should be recognized as a criminal act, 
having especial notice among the penalties of the 
law. The loss attendant at the destruction of the 
Brooklyn Theatre was a fearful commentary upon 
the lack of attention given in this theatre to the 
subject, and the remarkable rapidity with which 
the flames spread throughout the building, and 
the shortness of time required for its total de- 
struction, showed the headway that a fire can ob- 
tain in a building constructed in the usual man- 
ner of this class, under these circumstances. I am 



informed that, upon the eventful night, the thea- 
tre was under the control and management of a 
visiting company ; that there were no appliances 
upon the premises available for the extinguish- 
ment of fire, those previously there having been 
removed. 

In addition to this, I am also informed that, to 
ventilate the galleries, recourse was had to the 
construction of a wooden ventilating flue, exteiid- 
ing from the rear of the theatre up towards the 
ventilator in the roof, over the centre of the audi- 
torium. 

Apparently these were the two main causes of 
the calamity. There were other causes, however, 
cooperating with these, and accelerating them in 
a remarkable degree — the combustible interior 
finish; the opening of the doors of the stage en- 
trance, giving additional velocity and volume to 
the flames and smoke in their progress towards 
the front of the theatre ; the extinguishment of 
the gas-lights, leaving the occupants of the gal- 
lery passage in darkness; the absence thereof 
hand rails for proper support:; the occurrence of 
the jam, from which in the darkness, they were 
unable to extricate themselves before death by 
suffocation forestalled the still more painful one 
by fire. 

In my requisitions made upon our theatres, I 
have had in view— 

The complete separation of the stage portion of 
the theatre from the auditorium, for a length of 
time amply sufficient to allow, in a case of emer- 
gency, ail audience to leave the jjremises without 
danger. 

To provide, upon the stage, the most effective 
system in use for the extinguishment of fire. 

To provide such liberal means of egress, by in- 
creasing the number of exits, where practicable, 
and also by the removal of obstructions, as to ma- 
terially diminish the chances of the occurrence of 
a stoppage, and the time heretofore required to 
vacate the building. 

To require special protection from the causes 
of fire. 
To provide ample supply of water. 
Protection from combiistible interior finish. 
Provision for escape for the employes. 
For the purpose of establishing, for the time 
being, in a case of emergency, a complete separa- 
tion "between the stage portion of the theatre and 
the auditorium, I have required the proscenium 
walls to be lined up with tin or iron, or made non- 
combustible, their full width and height, up to the 
inside of the roof of the building. The proscenium 
openings are to be provided with a wire curtain, 
to be covered on the outside with a substantial 
non-combustible covering; and over the prosce- 
nium opening, and on the inside of the proscenium 
wall, is to be placed a perforated wrought-iron 
pipe, connected with high service, for the purpose 
of pouring down upon the curtain a continuous 
spray of water. The combination of these three 
appliances is new ; the wire will hold the flames in 
check, the uninflammable material secured to it 
confine the smoke, and the continuous streams of 
water maintain the integrity of the curtain intact, 
for a length of time amply sufficient to protect an 
audience while retiring. 

For the purpose of extinguishing fire I have re- 
quired a system of wrought-iron perforated pipes, 
connected with high service, sufficient in number 
and so placed that the entire stage, scenery and 
the ceiling above can be instantly drenched with 
a continuous shower of water. Where not al- 
ready done, I have required telegraphic communi- 
cation with the nearest engine house. I have also 
recommended the service of a regular fire natrol 
who shall be always upon the premises when'occu- 
pied by the public, and have charge and control 
of all apparatus and appliances for the extinguish- 
ment of fire. Movable gas lights have been or- 
dered to be removed and stationary ones substitu- 
ted. Woodwork and combustible material to be 
removed and kept from heating apparatus. The 
use of electricity in lighting those theatres not al- 
ready provided with it. 

The Boston Theatre. 

Special requisitions upon this theatre were as 
follows : 

An additional means of egress by cutting a door- 
way eight feet wide through the northerly wall, 
with metal-covered doors opening outward's. 

The window openings in this wall to be un- 
barred. 

Afford additional means of egress from gal- 
lery to auditorium, by reopening the closed stair- 
way. 



31 



BOARI3 OF AXjDEPljyCEN, 



The four closed aisles in the first gallery to be 
reopened. 

The outer door of stage entrance to be made to 
swing outwards. 

A metal-covered door to doorway of Are room, 
and the ceiling over the boiler to be protected. 

The wooden ventilator of boiler house to be pro- 
tected. 

The hand rail to circular stairways to be se- 
cured. 

The ceilina; underneath the stage to be protect- 
ed. 

Two iron balcony fire-escapes on the south side 
of the building, and one iron balcony fire-escape 
on the north side of the building, for means of 
escape from dressing rooms. 

The Boston Museum. 

The special requirements upon this theatre were 
as follows : 

Build a stairway from the easterly part of stage 
to the corridor of the second story, connecting 
with entrance on Court square. 

Provide metal-covered doors to doorway open- 
ing connecting stage with box-office. 

Make a new passageway from the balcony cir- 
cle, through to upper balcony of exhibition hall. 

Remodel stairway at the southeast corner of ex- 
hibition hall, increasing its width and making 
square landings. 

Enlarge aisles by removing seats in parquet. 

Move the Court-square stairway forward, and 
widen the same to nine feet six inches. 

Build a new flight of stairs from exhibition 
room to corridor, nine feet wide. 

Kemove circular stairway extending from audi- 
torium to corridor, and build a straight stairway 
with square landings, to floor of exhibition room, 
the said stairway "to be not less than nine feet 
wide. 

Provide an iron-balcony fire escape to east side 
of building. 

Rebuild partition separating the corridor from 
the store of Messrs. Smith, Doolittle & Smith, 
with non-combustible material. 

Place to the ceiling of the above-mentioned 
store a system of perforated wrought-iron pipes, 
with suitable connection, and rebuild the parti- 
tion, separating the chemical or compounding 
room from the store, and the partition separating 
the packing room from the store, of non-combus- 
tible material. 

All openings in said partitions to be provided 
with luetal-covered doors. 

The Howard Athenceum. 

The special requirements upon this theatre were 
as follows : 

The stairways extending from the floor of first 
story to floor of auditorium to be increased in 
width eighteen inches. 

The stairways extending from the parquet lobby 
to balcony to be made straight, and also not less 
than five feet wide. 

The circular gallery stairway at the northeast 
corner of building to be removed, and a stair- 
way, with two straight flights, having a square 
landing, to be built and to connect with outside 
stairway extending from the second story to the 
street. 

The said stairway is to be enclosed with brick 
or with iron. 

At the northwest corner 
stairway, with three straia 
landings, is to be built, anc 
iron. 

Two iron balcony fire-escapes, with ladders, are 
to be provided for the use of the employes — one 
to be placed upon the east side of building and 
one upon the west side, with suitable connections. 

The wooden floor over boiler to be removed and 
a fire-proof one built in its stead. 

A new flooring is to be built to old balcony, out- 
side of building. 

The aisles in the auditorium of theatre are to be 
closed up, and new ones made radiating towards 
the head of stairways. 

The rear row of seats in balcony to be removed. 

The partition separating the seats in the gallery 
from the passageway to be removed. 

The Globe Theatre. 

Upon this theatre the following special require- 
ments have been issued: 

Build one brick wall sixteen and twelve inches 
thick, to separate the southerly wing from the 



of building a gallery 
jht flights and square 
L is to be enclosed with 



main building, the said wall to be the width of the 
said wing and to be carried the full height of 
building. All openings in this wall are to be pro- 
vided with metal-covered doors. 

The wooden partition separating the easterly 
wing from the main building to be sheathed with 
iron or tin, or made non-combustible. The door- 
way in this partition to be provided with a metal- 
covered door, and all other openings to be closed. 

The stairway leading to the auditorium from 
Essex-street entrance to be altered to an inclined 
plane. 

The short stairway leading to auditorium from 
main entrance to be altered to an inclined plane. 

The southerly balcony staii-way to be extended, 
increased in width, and the projecting partition is 
to be removed. 

The gallery stairway of the Washington-street 
entrance to be provided with a hand rail. 

The gallery stairs of the Essex-street entrance 
to be provided with two hand rails. 

A new aisle to be made in the gallery, and so 
placed as to connect the two main lobby en- 
trances. 

Index signs and words to be painted upon the 
walls, pointing out the exits to Essex street and 
Hayward place. 

The front-balcony entrance to be widened three 
feet by removing projecting partition. 

An iron balcony staircase to be placed at the 
east side of the east wing of main building, to in- 
clude all stories but the first. 

Passages from the corridor in each story of said 
wing to be opened to connect with said iron stair- 
case and balcony. 

Combustible interior finish to be removed and 
the walls and ceilings protected. 

Music Hall, 

Upon this hall I have made the following requi" 
sitious : 

The doors of the Bromfield-street entrance are 
to be made to open outwards. 

Aisles at the southwest corner of galleries to be 
widened. A new exit, twelve feet wide, is to be 
made through the westerly wall, opening into 
Hamilton place. 

Investigations are in progress at the present 
time, both in this country and in England, to as- 
certain the extent that protection can be obtained 
in theatres whose interiors have been constructed 
without special attention having been given to 
safety from fire, and any substantial progress 
made in these investigations will be immediately 
recognized by the department. It is claimed by 
some that standpipes with hose connections are 
adequate, and that they will afford all the protec- 
tion that may be required. In my opinion, how- 
ever, they are insufficient; the time consumed in 
running out the hose, in turning on the water, and 
in getting into position, and, in addition, the lia- 
bility of the hose to accident, and the danger of 
being driven away from the fire, call for a more 
ready and reliable means of protection. 

The sprinklers that I have required will be al- 
ways in place, and also be in the most desirable 
position for practical operation and effect, and 
are of a material and of such strength as to be not 
liable to get out of order, and will last for many 
years. They constitute at present the most effect- 
ual method known for the extinguishment of fire, 
and the ease and readiness with which they can 
be brought into operation, the shortness of time 
required, and the certainty of their action, com- 
mend them to the favorable opinion of the pub- 
lic. The necessity for some such method is ap- 
parent when we consider that the stage of a thea- 
tre is generally filled to a considerable height 
with material known to be of a highly combusti- 
ble nature, and in order to prevent a fire from 
getting under such a headway as to be beyond 
control, it is of the utmost importance that the 
tire-extinguishing appliances be brought promptly 
into action, before the opening of the doors of 
the building produce such a draft as to powerful- 
ly augment the momentum and volume of the 
flames. 

The new curtain which has been devised will 
practically close up the proscenium opening, and 
thus separate, for the time being, the auditorium 
from the stage. Constructed of wire gauze, with 
a strong and firm non-combustible covering se- 
cured to the outside, and protected by continuous 
sprays of water from a pipe located immediately 
over the curtain, sufficient confidence may be 
placed in it by an audience, in a case of fire, to 



JANUARY 32, 18 77. 



32 



dismiss all fears, upon making an orderly retreat 
from the premises. 

"While I consider the requisitions that have been 
issued on these buildings the niost practical and 
effective that can be required, I am of the opinion 
that it is necessary that an advanced step be 
taken, and the building law be so amended, as to 
require upon all new buildings of this class, fire- 
proof construction throughout. 

The New Amendment to the Building Law. 

At the last session of the Legislatirre a petition 
was presented requesting an important modifica- 
tion of the building law. This petition was pre- 
sented in the interest of a gentleman who, for 
several years past has been active in his endeav- 
ors to procure such amendments to the law as 
would permit the erection of thin walls ; the os- 
tensible object being the building of cheap homes 
for the working people. It was purposed to legal- 
ize the erection of these cheap buildings in the 
more thickly-settled and desirable portions of the 
city, and after considerable opposition, and 
against the remonstrances of many of the princi- 
pal architects and the entire insurance interests, 
the bill was passed, but with an amendment limit- 
ing the area of its operation to that portion of the 
city not included within the building limits. 

There has been but one permit issued duriag the 
year to erect a building under the provisions of 
this act. 

The Operations of the Department. 

Brick, stone and iron buildings, 200; wood and 
frame buildings, 532; wooden sheds for which spe- 
cial permits have been Issued to erect 
upon wharves, within the building limits of 
the city, 17 buildings for which permits 
have been issued to have additions built 
to them, or alterations and repairs made 
upon them, 1936; steam engines and steam 
boilers set, 110; ovens erected, 15; kilns built, 6; 
furnaces set, 17; notices received of intention to 
put in heating apparatus, 257; violations record- 
ed, 452; cases referred to the City Solicitor, 30; 
unsafe buildings, walls, etc., 77; danger- 
ous chimneys, 371: unsafe heating appara- 
tus, 32; 'unsafe lighting appuratus, 40; 
defective flues, 7; unsafe flagstaffs, etc., 6; build- 
ings examined that were damaged by fire, 291; 
requisitions issued for tire escapes and additional 
means of egress, 62; hoistways and elevators ex- 
amined, 84; public halls, etc., examined, with ref- 
erence to granting a license to occupy the same, 
26; street signs licensed by the Board of Alder- 
men, examined with reference to their security, 
15; brick buildings completed during the year, 
266; wooden or frame buildings completed, 613; 
buildings upon which alterations have been made 
and to which additions have been built, or upon 
which repairs have been made, 1785; estimated 
cost of the erection of the brick buildings, not in- 
cluding the land, $5,343,575; estimated cost of the 
erection of the wooden or frame buildings, $1,383,- 
555; estimated cost of alterations, additions and 
repairs, .$1,335,446; e.stimated cost of securing un- 
safe buildino-s, unsafe walls, unsafe foundations, 
dangerous chimneys, etc., $22,728; estimated cost 
of the erection of ovens, furnaces, etc., and the 
setting of steam engines, steam boilers, not in- 
cluding the cost of the boilers, $32,270; estimated 
cost of setting heating apparatus, not including 
the cost of the apparatus, $9220 ; estimated cost of 
protecting hoistway openings, $3518. 

Total number of examinations made is 23,526; 
the number of notices issued. 852. 

Unsafe Buildings. 

To a certain extent the work of the depart- 
ment is confidential, general publicity being given 
only to permits issued for the erection of .new 
buildings. 

In the examinations of buildings with reference 
to their safety, security, means of egress, fire 
escapes, or improper or defective construction, or 
the existence on them of violations of the building 
law, a strong feeling of repugnance is usually 
manifested by the owner, or other interested par- 
ty, to having the condition of their property made 
the subject of public comment in the newspapers; 
and in view of this feeling, so pointedly manifest- 
ed, the department has abstained from publish- 
ing its work in this direction, when the interest of 
the public would not be jeopardized. 

The following exhibit wdl show, in tabular form, 
the number that have been secured, etc.: 



w 


m 


H 


'y', 


CD 


2 


»: 


o 




a 


W 
a 


1 


et- 


P- 


p. 






: 


o 


V 








A 


«■ 








ES 








Unsafe buildings 

" walls 

" cornice 

" conductor 

" floors and roof 

" foundation 

" . gutter 

" lintel 

' ' overloaded floor 

" pier 

" railing 

slate 

staging 

" ventilator 

Dangerous chimneys 

Defective flues 

Unsafe flagstaff 

" forge ... 

" furnace 

" heating apparatus . , 

" lantern 

" lighting apparatus. 

" sign 



12 


.5 


4 


13 


3 


4 


8 






2 


.... 




2 




1 


2 


.... 


1 



305 

"i 



30 
5 
2 



2: 
■ 1 

38 
2 



.1. 



. I . 



1 .... 
28 

1 
40 



23 

25 
4 
2 
3 
3 
1 
5 
1 
2 
1 
4 
2 
1 
374 
7 
2 
1 
1 

32 
1 

40 
1 



■ Total 316 85 13 122 536 

Fire and Accident Record. 

The number of buildings reported as damaged 
by fire and accident is 291. 

This number does not include those buildings 
where the loss was confined to the contents of the 
building, nor those where the damage was less 
than five dollars. 

These buildings are carefully surveyed, and any 
defect in their construction is required to be 
remedied. 

The following table will show the number of 
these buildings in each ward, their estimated 
value and the estimated loss : 



Coo 



r^lo>o>o«>oolOlaloli500ooooooooooOK5 



-Hi— I OJ 

c3 cS ;3 
§ o'S 



oooolooooooooooooooooooooo 

0>00>Ot-OOOOOOOOOOCOOOOOOOOi-0 000 
(MM COC^iHCOi-l OOtO-*l>r-mt-OOHH'*IM-*0>r-l 



O 3 



OlC2MrHia05rH0-lC0t--*«'lOWC500(MC0OOTHlO0000lO 
MH H tHH r-(r-t(MOqrHH iH tH H ,HrH 



T3 


iHOiOOiOLOWC • 


• -oiooooomooooomio 


H 


O 


CO CO 05 1- 1-1 (>j ic o : 


: :T^^coc5 0HlO'^■^cD■*.lOln«m•1 


O 




Of 


OlMe-IMIM • 


. .Mffi'OrHOOS 


•^owiot-soTH 


H 


oco 


») r-( 


(MHn-* 


>0<MC-<»KC 


a. 


3& 






rH -H 








A^^mm« 






34 


1 


IHHII 


e 






_. 03 


HIr-O0CiM'*'HH • 


• -t-ioH-^ocoHooocqcooot-io 


00 




(MH 


T-4 


r-IHiH 


r-l r-lH 


t^ 










H 



S o 


oio -laooKMoioinioooo oooiao. -o • ■ • • 

LOO IWlOlOOiC-WlOrHCDOl :iC10t-0»0 :H I I I I 

S610 . ■*•*»! O03O_c<3H . coin 00^ 


CO 


No. of 

Brick 

Buildings. 




o 

H 


1 


rHMCC-^ldcO^^MOJdrHoicO-^lOCOt-^OOcsdTHINoi^lO 
^-lT^HHTH^-l1-IHr-I^He^(^^««(MM 





One iron building in Ward 15 was damaged to 
the extent of $5000, and five stone buildings at 

$3080. 



33 



BOARD OF A I^ 1) K K ]NI E; N . 



Examinations. 
Tbe daily outside work of tlie department con- 
sists in the' constant supervision of the buildings 
in the city, with reference to safety, and their 
conformity witli legal requirements, the following- 
table being a summary of this work : 

New buildings 12,356 

Additions, alterations and repairs 8,292 

- 163 

633 

223 

199 

216 

660 

12 

18 

306 

448 



Special examinations. 
Insufficient egress and flre-escapf 

Hoistway examinations 

Steam eiigine and boilers 

Unsafe buildings 

Dangerous chimneys 

Defective flues 

Unsafe heating apparatus 

Fire 

Sundry , 



Total number of examinations 23,526 

Completed Buildings. 

The whole number of brick buildings completed 
during the year is two hundred and sixty-six, at 
an estimated cost of five million three hundred 
forty-three thousand five hundred seventy-five 
dollars ($5,343,575). These buildings contain one 
hundred fourteen stores, and are constiucted to 
accommodate four hundred eighty-two families. 

The whole number of wood and frame buildings 
completed is six hundred thirteen (613), at an es- 
timated cost of one million three hundred eighty- 
three thousand five hundred fifty- five dollars 
($1,383,555). These buildings contain twenty-seven 
stores, and are constructed to accommodate five 
hundred seventy-six families. « 

The number of buildings upon which alterations 
have been made is seventeen hundred eighty-five, 
at an estimated cost of one million three hundred 
thirty-five thousand four hundred forty-six dol- 
lars ($1,335,446). 

Table Showing the Number of 
ings, etc., during the Year, 
Estimated Cost. 



Completed Builds- 
together with the 





CO 


3 

a o 


o 

2« 


P3 

o 3 




5 O 


5-0 


O O 


s-l 




DO 




03 


p. 


Brick buildings.... 


266 


482 


114 


Ji!5,343.575 


Wooden or frame 










buildings 


613 


576 


27 


1,383,555 


Additions, altera- 










tions and re- 










pairs 1,785 


.... 




1,335,446 


Unsafe buildins se- 










cured 


60 






15,780 


Setting heating fur- 










naces, etc 


200 


.... 


. .. • 


9,220 


Ovens, furnaces, 










steam engines and 










boilers 


235 


> • . * 


• • ■ • 


32,270 


Dangerous chim- 










neys secured 


425 


• ■ • ft 


• . • > 


6,948 


Hoistways 


68 






3,518 



Totals 3,652 1,058 141 

BOND APPKOYED. 



3,130,313 



The bond of John MacConnell, constable, being 
presented duly certified, was approved bv the 
Board. 

LICENSES. 

Alderman Fitzgerald submitted reports as fol- 
lows from the Committee on Licenses : 

Minors' Applications Granted— 1 bootblack, 9 
newsboys. 

Common Victuallers Licensed— William Spur- 
geon, 254 Tremont street; Joseph Vanderslice, 626 
Broadway. 

Billiard Licenses Granted— J. G. Cooper, Provi- 
dence Railroad depot; John B. Fisher, 316 Broad- 
way; Artemas B. Sherman, Harrison Square. 

Junk Dealer Licensed— John E. Adler, 32 Hamp- 
shire street. 

Dealer in Second-Hand Articles Licensed — Mary 
E. Roberts, 109% Blackstone street. 

Amusement License Granted — Professor S. S. 
Baldwin, to give lectures exposing Spiritualism at 
Tremont Temple, Jan. 22-27. 

Intelligence Offices Licensed— Ellen Howard. 913 
Washington street; Anna Peterson, 16 Stanif'ord 
street. 

Auctioneers Licensed— Andrew P. Fisher, 8 and 
10 Maverick square; John Glancy, 13 New Cross 
street; Michael J. Moss, 790 AVashington street; 
Patrick Kilroy, 1368 Tremont street; M. Frank 
Paige (renewal), 125-127 Pearl street. 

Junk Collector Licensed— John W. Morris, 380 
Bennington street. 



Wagon License Granted— John W. Moiris, 380 
Bennington street. 

Bowling Alley Licensed— Catherine T. Tripp, 21 
Fleet street. 

Severally accepted. 

Repoi't on petition of Poland & Peabody for 
omnibus line, with an order of notice to the South 
Boston Railroad Company and all others interest- 
ed, that the Board will consider the subject on 
Monday, Jan. 29, at -i^:, P. M., when all jjarties ob- 
jecting may be heard." Order passed. 

FANEDIL HALL. 

Alderman Fitzgerald submitted a report in 
favor of granting the use of Faneuil Hall to Otis 
Norcross ef aL, for a public meeting Jan. 23. Ac- 
cepted. 

COST OF PUBLISHING ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

Aldeiman Breck submitted a report that the 
Committee on Ordinances on the part of the Board ■ 
had consulted the City Solicitor, who informs 
them that there ib no legal objection to passing 
the order relating to the payment by petitioners 
of the cost of advertising orders of notice, and the 
committee recommend its passage. The order 
was passed. 

PAVING REPORTS AND ORDERS. 

Alderman Robinson submitted the following 
from the Committee on Paving : 

Reports and orders for hearing, on Monday, 
Feb. 19, at 4 P. M., on petitions of South Boston 
Railroad Company for leave to run their cars to 
Causeway street, and Metropolitan Railroad Com- 
pany for location in Lexington, Prescott and Liv- 
erpool streets. Orders x>assed. 

Report of leave to withdraw on petition of 
Henry Gassett el al., for plank walk on Centre 
street, Ward 24. 

Report and order to pay Robert Povah and Hel- 
en his wife $250 for grade damages at 68 West 
Sixth street. Order read twice and passed. 

Report and order to nay John Cronin and Mary 
his wife $500 for grade'damages at 280, 282 and 284 
Dorchester avenue, and rescinding order of Dec. 
30, 1876, to pay John Cronin said amount for said 
damages. Order read twice and passed, after an 
explanation by Alderman Fitzgerald that after 
the passage of the order of last year it was found 
that the wife had an interest in the estate with 
her husband, and the City Solicitor had decided 
that the original order was defective. This ordei 
is to pay the husband and wife jointly. 

SUPPLIES FOR LAMP DEPARTMENT. 

Alderman Thompson offered an order, That the 
Superintendent of Lamps be, and he is hereby au- 
thorized under the approval of the Committee on 
Lamps during the municipal year 1877, to contract 
for and purchase the lamp posts, brackets, burn- 
ers, tips, cocks, lanterns, tools, stable supplies, 
and such other articles as shall be found necessary 
for the carrying on of the Lamp Department; also 
to employ such number of men as may be necessa- 
ry; the cost thereof to be charged to the appropri- 
ation for Lamps. Read twice and passed. 

REFERENCE OF CLAIMS FOB STREET DAMAGES. 

Alderman Clark offered an order, That when- 
ever the Committee on Streets of this Board 
deem it for the best interest of the city to refer 
claims for damages or betterments relating to the 
laying out or widening of streets to arbitration 
for settlement, the said committee is hereby au- 
thorized to refer such claims, with the approval 
of his Honor the Mayor and the City Solicitor. 
Read twice and passed. 

ARMORIES. 

Alderman O'Brien offered an order. That the 
Committee on Armories be authorized to repair 
and fit up the armory occupied by Company D, 
Fourth Battalion of Infantry, M. V. M., at"" the 
corner of Orleans and Webster streets ; the ex- 
pense, not exceeding the sum of $250, to be 
charged to the appropriation for Armories. Read 
twice and passed. 

PUBLIC LANDS. 

Alderman O'Brien submitted a report of leave 
to withdraw from the Committee on Public Lands 
on petition of Maria Davis el al., for abatement 
of assessment on account of raising the grade of 
the Northampton-street district. Accepted. Sent 
down. 

FRANKLIN FUND. 

Alderman Burnham offered an order, That a 
committee of two members of this Board be ap- 
pointed to examine the accounts of the treasurer 
of the Franklin Fund. Read twice and nassed. 



JANUARY- 



2 



a 



1877. 



34. 



Aldermen Burnham and Wilder were appointed 
said^committee. 

PERMITS FOR STABLES. 

-Alderman Viles submitted reports from the 
Committee on Health on the part of the Board, in 
favor of granting leave, on the usual conditions, 
to occupy stables by J. E. Lyons, 282 Princeton 
street ; Abraham B. Shedd, rear 300 Main street ; 
George T. McLauthlin, Park street, Ward 22. 
Severally accepted. 

SEWEBS. 

Alderman Viles submitted reports from the 
Committee on Sewers, with orders for assessment 
and collection of cost of sewers in Sargent street 
and Lawrence and Blue Hill avenues. Orders sev- 
erally passed. 

COOPEB-STBEET ABMOBY. 

Alderman Fitzgerald, from the Joint Committee 
on Public Buildings, submitted an order. That the 



Committee on Public Buildings be authorized to 
sell by auction the land and building belonging to 
the city situated on Cooper street and known as 
the Cooper-street Armory, there being no further 
use for the same; the proceeds of sale to be paid 
to the City Collector. 

Alderman Fitzgerald— That order passed through 
the Committee on Public Buildings at their last 
meeting. An order like it was passed by the last 
City Government, but the committee had not time 
to complete the sale of the building. The build- 
ing is unoccupied, but latterly has been used as a 
primary school. The windows are broken and it 
costs a good deal to keep it in repair, and there is 
no further use for it. The committee ask leave to 
sell it by public auction; whether this is the time 
to do that is for the City Council to consider. 

The order went over under the rule. 

Adjourned on motion of Alderman Gibson; and 
stood adjourned to Tuesday, Jan. 23, at 7% P. M., 
for a convention with the School Committee. 



35 



COMMON COUNCIX^ 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Oommon Council, 

JANUARY 35, 1877. 



Regular meeting at 71/2 o'clock P. M., Benjamin 
Pope, President, in the ciiair. 

PAPERS FEOM THE BOARD Ol" ALDERMEN. 

Annual reports of Sealer of Weights and Pleas- 
ures, Commissioner on Bridges between Boston 
and Cambridge, and Inspector of Buildings. Sev- 
erally placed on file. 

Petitions were referred in concurrence. 

Report leave to withdraw on the petition of 
Maria Davis et al., for abatement of assessment on 
account of raising the grade of Northampton- 
street district. Accepted'in concurrence. 

Order to supply furniture tor and make repairs 
on schoolhouses; order to provide furniture for 
and make repairs on the City Hall, engine houses 
and police stations. Severally ordered to a second 
reading. 

Trustee of Public Librarij. A certificate came 
from the other brancn, of the election of Osborne 
Howes, Jr., in place of Charles H. Reed, chosen by 
this Council. 

Mr. Reed of Ward 17—1 desire to express my 
thanks to the members of the Common Council 
for my election, at the last meeting, to represent 
them as a Trustee of the Public Library tor the 
ensuing year. Their action is all the more appre 
ciated as it came to me unexpected and without 
solicitation. The present year has opened with a 
unity of action on the part of the members of the 
Council which is duly to be praised, and I trust, in 
view of the many important measures to come be- 
fore us, that it may continue during the year. 
Therefore I request that the members who voted 
tor me at the last meeting will consider that I am 
not a candidate ; and I call attention to the regu- 
lar nomination which is now before them for con- 
currence. 

A ballot was ordered. Committee— Messrs. Smar- 
don of Ward 10, Brown of Ward 23, and Spenceley 
of Wa,rd 19. 

Whole niunber of votes 62 

Necessary for a choice 32 

Osborne Howes, Jr., had 48 

Charles H. Keed 12 

C.J. Spenceley 1 

George L. Rumn 1 

And Mr. Howes was declared elected in concur- 
rence. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Order for Committee on Bathing to repair and 
maintain the bathing houses, to employ assist- 
ance, and take measures for care and preserva- 
tion of said houses ; orders for City Surveyor and 
City Engineer to make purchuses of supplies, in- 
struments and drawing materials, and to incur 
other necessary expenses ; order for Superintend- 
ent of Health to make contracts for purchase of 
hay, grain, horses, exchanges and materials. Sev- 
erally passed in concurrence. 

DOCUMENTS FOR SOCIAL LAW LIBRARY. 

Mr. Pierce of Ward 24—1 move to reconsider the 
vote whei'eby was passed the order to furnish the 
Social Law Library two coi^ies of the Revised Or- 
dinances and other publications of the city, as 
therein specified. I make this motion, sir, in or- 
der to move, if it prevails, that the order be re- 
ferred to the Committee on Printing, which is tlte 
usual channel for such matters, they having the 
disposition of such documents generally. AVhen 
the order was iDassed at the last meeting it was 
very late in the evening, and the fact that it had 
not been referred to the Committee on Printing 
escaped my attention. 

Mr. Pratt of Ward 21— The Social Law Library, 
as many members of this Council are aware, is an 
old institution in Boston. It was incorporated in 
1814 and since that time has acquired the position 
and held it— and does today— of the best law libra- 
ry in New England. The library is open to free 
consultation and examination by the judges of 
all the courts of this State and of the United 
States; to all the prosecuting officers of the courts 
of this State and the United States ; to the mem- 
bers of the General Court, and, in general, to the 
civil officers of the State. It is also open to mem- 
bers of the bar, by the terms of its charter, I 
think, who do not have a regular place of busi- 
ness in the county of Suffolk. It is open 



to the members of the bar in the county of Suf- 
folk who either own a share in the library, upon 
which there is an annual assessment of $5, or who 
pay what is called an annual subscription of $10. 
It is thus open virtually to all citizens for consult- 
ation upon all matters through their counsel, or 
by introduction to the librarian or to any of the 
trustees. In fact, it is as completely and singular- 
ly as public an institution as any institution of the 
kind can be which is obliged to" rely upon its own 
revenues to pay its expenses. ' I make this 
explanation in detail, because many of 
the gentlemen here may not know all 
the claims of the library. The library has 
a very central location, and a very large col- 
lection of books ; its terms are made as low as pos- 
sible, consistently with the keeping of the books 
in repair and in good order and the cost of 
taking care of the library will allow. It is in 
many respects a meritorious institution, and a 
public benefit. Now, the price of two copies of 
the Revised Ordinances is a very small item ; but 
we all know how these institutions must husband 
their resources, and how even trifles as- 
sist them. It is an assistance to the li- 
brary that our Representatives in Congress 
send them documents from Washington ; that 
our Representatives in the Legislature send them 
public documents from the btate House ; and I 
think it will be nothing more than disposing, in a 
manner for the isublic benefit, of the documents 
contemplated in the order which I offered at the 
last meeting, for this City Council to bestow upon 
this institution two copies of the Revised Ordi- 
nances and of the supplements as they may be 
issued, and also one copy each of the other bound 
publications of the city. Many persons may not 
be aware of the great convenience and importance 
of having these documents easily accessible, with- 
out the expenditure of time, when some questions 
are to be examined and decided upon in haste, as 
they frequently are ; and gentlemen of this Council 
who are members of the bar will bear me out in 
saying that it is a great convenience, at the Social 
Law Library, to have a full set of these documents. 
I am informed by the librarian that he has hereto- 
fore been furnished with one copy of the ordinanc- 
es by coming here and asking for it of the Printing 
Committee. He says it will be very desirable for 
the purposes of the library to have one copy for 
permanent use in the library, that cannot be taken 
away, and one copy that can be taken out as other 
books are; and that is the reason why the 
Older was drawn to cover two copies of 
the ordinances. This is a small matter, 
and' perhaps might well have gone to the 
Committee on Printing. I should not have object- 
ed to its reference to the Committee on Printing 
in the first instance ; in fact, I do not know that I 
have any serious objection to the reconsideration 
prevailing and the order going to the Committee 
on Printing; but inasmuch as it passed, and inas- 
much as the object was to leave the Committee on 
Printing tree from any imputation of partiality 
toward one institution, and also to make it a per- 
manent thing, I thought it better to bring it up in 
this form. I cannot object very strongly to the 
reconsideration, but at the same time 1 see no ad- 
vantage in it. I therefore hope that the order 
will be allowed to stand as it has been passed, and 
that the reconsideration will not prevail. 

Mr. Pierce of Ward 24—1 have no desire to ar- 
gue the question of the propriety of furnishing 
these publications to the Social Law Library, but 
it does seem to me that the proper and usual dis- 
position of an order of this kind is to refer it to 
some committee; and in this case it would be the 
Committee on Printing. I think, however, so far 
as I am personally concerned— of course I do not 
speak for the committee — that we should be care- 
ful how we begin voting these documents— more 
especially the laws and ordinances — away to pri- 
vate associations or individuals, especially as 
they are all for sale. As far as my limited ex- 
perience goes, if we once begin it is pretty 
hard for a committee, or for the Council, 
to draw the line — having given them to a party 
with an equal claim — and stop. I would state that 
a member of the Committee on Ordinances of last 
year, under whose supervision this work of re- 
vision was done — and who is also a member of the 
present Council — made application for a certain 
number of copies of the Revised Ordinances, stat- 
ing that the members of the Committee on Ordi- 
nances, who gave a great deal of time to it, had 
more claim to them than other members of the 
Council. The Committee on Printing consider- 
ed that that committee had claims, and voted 



JAN UARY 



2 



1877, 



36 



them one copy in addition to those given other 
members, but that was a reduction from the 
number asked for. I merely state that in explana- 
tion of the fact that we did not give more than 
one copy extra to members who had worked a 
great deal upon the matter, and because the ques- 
tion has been raised whether we should give more 
than one copy to individuals. 

Mr. Clarke of Ward 22-1 understood the gentle- 
man [Mr. Piatt] to state that the law library is 
open to members of the Legislature. I should like 
to inquire if it is open to members of the City 
Government? 

Mr. Pratt of Ward 21-1 would not undertake to 
answer by the book, but my understanding is that 
all the civil officers of the State — and the mem- 
bers of the Common Council are civil officers- 
have the privileges of the library. In answer to 
one point raised by the gentleman [Mr. Pierce] on 
the Printing Committee, I would say that I think 
it would be a very stnall consideration for this 
Council to pay for the large use made of the 
library by the City Solicitor and his department in 
referring to the very large collection of books, 
from the times of the year books until this time, 
if we in our turn furnish the Law Library with 
copies of the city ordinances and of the city re- 
Ijorts for the use of the other members of the 
library. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 9— Having been on the 
Printing Committee in past years, I would merely 
say that the custom of the Council has been— and 
It seems to me it would be proper, as the gentle- 
man on behalf of the committee has said— to refer 
such matters to the Printing Committee. The So- 
cial Law Library is substantially a free institu- 
tion to the judges and lawyers, and I do not 
doubt the Printing Committee would furnish it 
with one ov more copies; but it seems to me that 
in the ordinary course of business the order 
should be referred to that committee. 

The reconsideration prevailed, and on motion of 
Mr. Pierce of Ward 24, the order was referred to 
the Committee on Printing. Sent up. 

PUBLIC LANDS. 

Mr. Clarke of Ward 22 presented the annual re- 
port of the Superintendent of Public Lands 
(City Doc. No. 14). Sent up. 

The sales of lands during the year have amount- 
ed to $2844, of which $288 have been received in 
cash, and a bond for the remainder has been 
taken. There have also been received from rents, 
etc., .$2925.33. The expenses of the department 
were $4195.53. The number of feet of salable 
lands in charge of the commitee is — in city proper 
369,739, in South Boston 562,737, in Boston High- 
lands 750,130, in Dorchester 1,759,253, in Charles- 
town 49,240 feet and one lot valued at $50,000 ; 18 
acres in Brighton ; in West Roxbury 48,816 and on 
the Northampton-street district 183,708 feet. 

SEWEBS. 

Mr. Clarke of ward 22 presented the annual 
report of the Superintendent of Sewers (City 
Doc. 13). Sent up. 

The expenditures for 1876 were $211,987.73. Fol- 
lowing is a statement of the work of laying 
sewers : 

City proper, 4,4:67 feet 813,503.31 

Charlestown, 1,485 " 2,168.91 

East Boston, 902 " 1,316.79 

South Boston, 1,945 " 7,699.39 

Roxbury, 9,029 " 33,370,97 

W. Roxbm-y, 21,179 " 49,748.41 

Dorchester, 12,769 " 34,147.64 

Miscellaneous, 70,032.32 

Total, 51,776 feet, or 9.8miles $211,987.74 

There are now in the whole city about 175 miles 
of sewers. 

The items of miscellaneous expenses are as fol- 
lows: Stony Brook, land taken in West Roxbury, 
$2786.16; Stony Brook, culvert at Forest Hills, 
$84.39.30; land damages for sewers, $24,369.69; re- 
pairing sewers and outlets, $6246.15; cleaning sew- 
ers and outlets, $2286.58; dredging at outlets, 
$4168.12; covering manholes, $505.35; repairing 
streets, $796.99; work for other departments, 
$1065.43; Stationery and printing, $1128.53; horse 
and keeping, $592.68; hardware and blacksmith- 
ing, $353.58; teaming, .§302.21 ; salaries and office 
expenses, $8936.12; yards and lockers, $1109.24; re- 
pairing wharf, $.500; sundry small expenses, 
$947.82; committee expenses, $745.55; water rates, 
$250; labor not charged elsewhere, $1019.95; in- 
crease in stock of pipe, .$3482.87; total miscellane- 
ous, $70,032.32. 

The principal work the past season has been in 
Jamaica Plain, West Roxbury, and in Harriso 



Square, Dorchester, and drainage facilities are 
provided for nearly all the improved portions of 
the suburbs within four miles of City Hall. The 
new culvert for Stony Brook, at Forest Hills sta- 
tion, was finished during the summer, and the 
whole question of the imj^rovement of this chan- 
nel has been referred to the Street Commission- 
ers. In arranging a system of sewers for any 
district, the size is governed chiefly by the amount 
of water which must be carried "away in heavy 
rain storms, and the details of the plan are regu- 
lated by the points where the sewers are to receive 
this water, and the quantity at each. Atpresentthis 
important feature of the system is entirely beyond 
the control of this department. The catch basins 
for street water are located and built by the Pav- 
ing Department, entered into any sewer that can 
be found, and often in an improper manner; no 
plans made, and no notice given, and they are 
then abandoned, so far as any future care or re- 
sponsibility goes. In time they are found by the 
employes of the Health Department, who clean 
out the gravel from them, and renew the covers 
when they are worn out. Meanwhile, instead of 
being the chief agency for cleansing the sewers, 
the discharge from them may have obstructed the 
current, injured the structures, and deposited 
gravel ror a long distance below, to be tediously 
and expensively removed by the Sewer Depart- 
ment. This complexity of administration, with 
its pernicious results, is unknown in any other 
city. 

PETITIONS rRESENTED. 

By Mr. Smardon of Ward 10— Petition of Isa- 
bella Jordan to be compensated for injuries re- 
ceived by a sled on Boston Common. 

By Mr. Sibley of Ward 5— Petition of Clinton 
White to be paid for injuries caused by defect in 
highway over Charles River Bridge. 

By Mr. Dee of Ward 5— Petition of E. J. Foss for 
compensation for injuries received while walking, 
along Warren avenue. 

Severally referred to the Joint Committee on 
Claims. Sent up. 

yiBW FIRE-ALARM BOX IX WARD 24. 

Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19 submitted a report 
from the Joint Committee on Fire Department 
recommending the reference of the petition of S. 
P. Dexter et al. for a new fire-alarm box in Ward 
24 to the Board of Fire Commissioners. Accepted, 
and said reference ordered. Sent up. 

OLIVER-STREET IMPROVEMENT. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17 submitted a report 
from the Finance Committee, asking for the pas- 
sage of an order. That the order of Sept. 30, 1867, 
authorizing the borrowing of $150,000 on account 
of Oliver-street improvement, be and hereby is 
rescinded, and that the Auditor of Accounts be 
and hereby is authorized to transfer from unex- 
pended appropriation of the present financial year 
the sum, less revenue received, advanced by the 
Treasurer under authority of said loan to meet 
the Auditor's drafts drawn in payment for said 
Oliver-street Improvement. 

Ordered to a second reading. 

UNIFORMS FOR FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8 offered an order. That 
the Committee on Fire Department be requested 
to prescribe a uniform to be worn by the Commis- 
sioners of the Fire Department and report an or- 
der requiring said commissioners to comply with 
"General Order" No. 60 so far as it relates to the 
wearing of uniforms. 

Mr. McGaragle moved the reference of the order 
to the Committee on Fire Department. Declared 
lost. Mr. McGaragle doubting the vote, the Coun- 
cil divided— 17 for, 25 against. 

The order was refused a second reading. 

EGRESS FROM SCHOOLHOUSES. 

Mr. Mowry of Ward 11 offered an order. That 
the Inspector of Buildings be requested to report 
to this body his opinion as to the expediency of 
making alterations in any of our schoolhouses as 
to the matter of egress. 

Ordered to a second reading and put upon its 
passage. 

Mr. Clarke of Ward 22— It seems to me that that 
order ought to be referred to the Committee on 
Public Buildings, and I move its reference to that 
committee. 

Carried. Sent up. 

LABOR ON PUBLIC GROUNDS. 

Mr. Howes of Ward 18 offered an order. That 
the-Committee on Common and Public Grounds 
be authorized to expend an additional sum of 



37 



COJVLMOJSr COUNCIL 



$1200 for labor on the puolie grounds ; tlie expense 
to be charged to the appropriation for Common 
and Public G-rounds. 

Mr. Howes — The order has not been before the 
Committee on Public Grounds, as it should have 
been, but I have received a note stating that un- 
less it is passed tonight the men will have to wait 
several days for their pay, as the Auditor cannot 
pay them on the first of the month unless the or- 
der is passed before the pay roll is made up. The 
money has already been appropriated, but that 
particular portion of the general appropriation for 
labor has been exceeded, and this is merely to 
transfer a portion to this specific object. 

The order was ordered to a second reading and 
then passed, under a suspension o*" the rule, on 
motion of Mr. Howes. Sent up. 

TWENTY-SECOKD OF FEBKUARY. 

Mr. Smardon of Ward 10 offered an order, That 
his Honor the Mayor be and is hereby requested 
to cause the flags to be displayed and "bells to be 
rung in different parts of the city on the twenty- 
second day of February next, in commemoration 
of the anniversary of the birth of George Wash- 
ington; the expense attending the same to be 
charged to the appropriation for Incidental Ex- 
penses. 

Ordered to a second reading. 

SALARIES AND DUTIES OF CITV. OFFICERS AXD 
EMPLOYES. 

Mr. Thompson of Ward 9 offered an order, That 
the Committee on Salaries obtain from the heads 
of departments of the City Government a list of 
all salaried offices in said departments, with the 
salaries new paid and the salaries paid in 1860, or, 
if the office has been established since 1860, then 
the salary when first established ; also a state- 
ment of the duties incumbent upon the person 
filling each oflSce ; said list to be furnished the 
Council as soon as possible. 

The order was read twice and init upon its uas- 
sage. 

Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19—1 would like to ask if 
the committee are not doing this work at the pres- 
ent time? It seems to me we appointed a com- 
mittee to look after just this matter a few weeks 
ago. It seems to me that to order a committee to 
do what they were appointed to do is reflecting 
upon them. 

Mr. Thompson— I have looked at the reports of 
the Committee on Salaries for several years past, 
and I have not found one covering the matters 
asked for in the order. I ask that a report cover- 
ing those facts be laid before the Council. 

Mr. Dee of AVard 5—1 move that the order be re- 
ferred to the Joint Special Committee on Salaries 
and Expenditures. 

Mr. Thompson — I move as an amendment that 
it be referred to the Standing Committee on 
Salaries. 

Mr. Pratt of Ward 21—1 think that the motion 
for a reference might perhaps be offered as an 
amendment to the order. The object of the order, 
as I understand it, is to have the committee ascer- 
tain and report to this Council the names of all 
persons drawing salaries— the names of all officers, 
as 1 am corrected by the gentleman oflering the 
order — the names of officers to whom salaries are 
paid, and the amount of the salaries. I take it 
that this report, when ascertained and made, 
would furnish very good facts and information to 
consider in passing appropriation bills that will 
come up hereafter. Now, sir, if the order is sim- 
ply referred to the Joint Special Committee 
on Salaries and Expenditures, or to the Standing- 
Committee on Salaries, tliere will be no special 
object gained until it shall be reported back by 
them with a recommendation that it ought to pass 
or not to i^ass. I may be wrong or not, but it 
seems to me that the object of the gentleman who 
moved the reference could be better obtained by 
moving to amend so that the Joint Special Com- 
mittee on the Reduction of Salaries and Expen- 
ditures be requested to report, etc. 

The President— The Chair would call the atten- 
tion of the gentleman to the fact that the order 
contemplates a reference of the subject to the 
Committee on Salaries. 

Mr. Dee withdrew his motion to refer to the 
Joint Special Committee. 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8—1 move to amend by 
requiring them to report the names and residences 
of the officers. I think that is an important 
matter. 

Mr. Thompson — The order, as offered, does not 
contemplate giving the names of the officers. 



Unless the Council deem it wise, I have no desire 
to call for the names of the officers. 

Mr. McGaragle- I understood it to call for the 
names and amounts. 

The President read the order for information. 
" Mr. Reed of Ward 17— The Joint Special Com- 
mittee on Salaries and Expenditures are going 
into this matter as fast as possible. They are pre- 
paring to report on that subject, and if the gentle- 
man wishes that order referred to the Standing 
Committee on Salaries it will be going over a por- 
tion of the work we are doing. If the Council sees 
fit to add the other part in the order, it may be in- 
cluded. We intendto make a report just as soon 
as possible, and that subject Avill come under a 
portion of the report. 

Mr. Webster of Ward 3—1 think the members 
here don't understand the matter as it reads. As 
it reads it refers it to the Standing Committee on 
Salaries. Now the Joint Special Committee on 
Salaries is an entirely different committee. They 
are doing this work already. The have sent to 
the heads of departments a request in almost the 
exact words of the order. It will mix it up very 
badly if this committee do the same thing that it 
is now doing. 

Mr. Danforth of Ward 10— The Standing Com- 
mittee on Salaries have already commenced this 
work, and they want this very information to 
make up their report from. As I understand the 
order, it is intended to be reported to the Council 
with the report of the Committee on Salaries, so 
that when they do report the members of the 
Council may have information as to the salaries 
not only of the heads of departments but of the 
clerks in those departments. That I understand 
is the object of the order. I should be glad to 
get the information before the Council or in the 
hands of the Salary Committee before they make 
their report. 

Mr. Reed— We are pushing this work in order to 
do it, just as the gentleman requests. We shall 
do it without delay. 

Mr. Thompson of Ward 9— If the Joint Special 
Committee on Salaries and Expenditures are go- 
ing to give this information, there can be no harm 
in the passage of the order. All that is asked for 
is that it shall be laid before the Council before 
the Council passes upon the recommendations of 
either the Joint Special Committee or the Joint 
Standing Committee on Salaries. Some time 
within a month we shall be called upon to pass 
upon their recommendations. I for one would like 
to have before me, in as complete a form as 
possible, all the evidence in relation to the sala- 
ries of the city government; something to show 
what has been the increase of those salaries in the 
last fifteen years, and something of the nature of 
the duties of the individuals drawing those sala- 
ries, so that I C3,n make some estimate in my own 
mind and compare them with the duties of per- 
sons in similar positions outside of City Hall. I 
know that in the organization of the General Gov- 
erment, clerkships are divided into several grades, 
and the salaries are adjusted to suit the duties as- 
signed to those grades. Here, so far as I can judge 
from the report of the Auditor, the salaries 
paid persons performing pretty much the 
same duties are widely different; and heretofore 
it has been a difllcult matter to adjust those sal- 
aries because the City Council has never had be- 
fore it anything like complete evidence of the 
standing of affairs. I believe the report asked 
for in the order will give us something upo.^ 
which we can act intelligently. I have no inten- 
tion to interfere with the duties of any committee. 
I drew the order to refer it to the Standing Ci-m- 
mittee on Salaries, which seemed to be the 
proper one. They must necessarily go over the 
matter and they Tiust make recommendations to 
the Council; and I understand, in a general way, 
that we must consider their recommendations be- 
fore we consider those of the joint special commit- 
tee. I can see no reason for objecting to obtaining 
this information. Then when I take up the list 1 
see that here is one man having certain duties; he 
nandles a great deal of the city's money, and be- 
sides the work he performs he is under the obli- 
gation of heavy bonds, and he is paid a salary 
commensurate with the bonds. Here is an- 
other man doing clerical work requiring xjartic 
ular experience; he may have spent years 
acquiring his particular knowledge, and if 
we should reduce his salary we might lose 
very much more than the few hundred dol- 
lars we should gain. These might corre- 
spond to clerkships of the first class. There 
may be clerkshiijs of another class, in which impor- 



JANUAKY a 5 



1877 



38 



tant duties are performed, and there should be a 
salary established that will pay them fairly and 
well ; and the same salary should be paid In every 
department for the performance of similar duties. 
Then there is a work that may be performed by 
any man who writes a fair hand and can copy pa- 
pers put before him. Now it is easy to estimate 
what is a fair salary for that kind of labor, and 
my opinion is that the same salary should be 
paid to all clerks doing that kind of work. I 
look at the Auditor's report. Here is a man 
in one department put down as clerk, sal- 
ary 93500. Now, sir, if he performs only 
clerical labor, and if he gives no bonds, that seeihs 
to me to be a large salary. Then I see another de- 
partment where the expense is given in a round 
sum, and I find nothing put down for clerical ex- 
penses. After looking over that report, it occurred 
to me that I should like to see a list of the salaried 
offices, which would indicate the nature of the du- 
ties attached to each office ; and therefore I put 
in this order. It may be that the joint standing 
or the special committee would submit a report 
of this nature ; they, never have in previous 
years. Last year thereVas a Joint Special Commit- 
tee on the Equalization of Salaries, but they did 
nothing; the Joint Standing Committee on Sala- 
ries did make a report which was quite a lengthy 
document. It reported the number of offices of 
the Government, the salary couuected with each 
one, proposed a certain reduction, stating what 
the salary of the office is, and what it would be 
under the new rate paid. But that was not com- 
plete ; it did not take each department, give de- 
tails, and state the duties of each office. I should 
like to see each department given in detail — the 
salary of the head, ancT the salaries of 
the assistants, with their duties — and then 
for comparison, 1 should like to see the 
salary attached to that office before the great rise 
in prices began; and then I should like to pass 
upon the salaries of the different grades. I should 
like to take the offices in each department and 
compare their duties and salaries— the clerks in the 
Board of Health, City Engineer's Department and 
Street Commissioners, to learn whether they are 
performing pretty much the same class of duties, 
whether they are getting the same class of sala- 
ries, and whether they snould be changed, I can 
see no objection to having such a statement laid 
before the Council. 

Mr. Pratt of Ward 21— The explanations of the 
gentlemen of the special committee show very 
well, I think, that their labors, so far as they have 
progressed, tend to the production of just the sta- 
tistics wanted. I move to amend the order by 
striking out the words "Joint Standing Committee 
on Salaries" and inserting instead the words 
"Joint Special Committee on Salaries and Expen- 
ditures." I think this will insure us the report 
asked for. 

Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19—1 have no doubt that 
the information called for in the order would be 
very convenient for reference in printed docu- 
ment form, and there is one amendment which I 
wish to make to it, although perhaps we have no 
control over it in fact ; and that is, that we should 
have the salaries paid to the school teachers in 
1860 and the salaries paid them now. I don't know 
that the school teachers are getting enough now, 
or that our schools are costly enough. I think it 
would be well to look at the prices paid school 
teachers then and now. Therefore I wish to put 
in this amendment, although we may not have 
any control over the subject. 

Mr. Thompson — The school teachers are all of- 
ficers of the city, and I think they would be in- 
cluded in the order. 

Mr. Vose of Ward 24— It is the purpose of the 
joint special committee to investigate, as 
thoroughly as we can, every branch of the City 
Government, from the Mayor down to the school 
teachers — and all ladies notwithstanding. 
Mr. Spenceley— Good. 
Mr. Pratt's amendment was adopted. 
Mr. Pope of Ward 14—1 do not know that the pi- 
der is necessary, but if it is going to pass 1 wish to 
know the residences of the various employes in 
City Hall, and therefore I offer the following as a 
substitute : 

Ordered, That the Joint Special Committee on 
Salaries, be requested to report at the earliest 
practicable moment the names of all persons em- 
ployed in City Hall, with the place of residence of 
each, and the amount of salary paid to each at the 
present time ; also the amount of said salary in 
1860, and if the office of such person has been cre- 



ated since 1860 the, amount of said salary when 
created. 

Mr. Clarke of Ward 22— There are quite a num- 
ber of employes of the city who are not employed 
at City Hall." There are several departments out- 
side of City Hall which have clerks and employes. 
The gentleman [Mr. Pope] thinks his order covers 
that ; if so, I am satisfied. 

Mr. Thompson — I hope the substitute in its pres- 
ent form will not pass. It does not call for the 
principal information contemplated in the origi- 
nal order— the duties attached to the several 
offices. 1 hoped that the original order might 
pass, without calling up the personal feeling that 
might be attached by inserting the names of dif- 
ferent individuals. 1 wanted to call forth a piece 
of evidence, something tha,; we may take to 
our rooms and consult without reference 
to personal feeling of any kind. In looking 
over the list of salaries we might see the 
name of a personal friend, and, with the 
best of resolutions, we might find our action 
tinged with personal feelings ; we might think one 
salary suitable tor him which we might not think 
suitable for another in the same position. If we 
have a simple statement of the duties of each 
office and the salaries paid in 1860 and now, we 
can then, without any personal feeling, form a 
just estimate whether those salaries are compara- 
tively fair, whether it is desirable that they should 
be continued at the present rate, or wnether they 
should be increased or diminished in accordance 
with the recommendations to be offered by the 
joint standing or the joint special committee. I 
hope the order as originally introduced will pass. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17 — I move the indefinite 
postponement of the order for the following rea- 
son : We have an able committee upon this ques- 
tion of salaries and expenditures, and I think we 
can safely leave this whole matter to them; and 
in case they do not do their duty as we think they 
should, when they have made their report will be 
time enough for further instructions. I move the 
indefinite postponement of the whole matter. 

The President— The motion to an. end takes pre- 
cedence of the motion to postpone. 

The President read the original order and the 
substitute for information. 

Mr. Webster of Ward 3—1 hope the substitute 
will pass. The gentleman who first introduced 
this business thinks it will be convenient to have 
all the information possible. Now, if he is really 
serious in that wish, and would like to lay before 
the Council all the information possible, I want 
him to have it. Now, in regard to being preju- 
diced by our friend's name being published, I can 
say that I have a few friends in City Hall and can 
readily find them; but if any gentleman has so 
many friends that he cannot find them I think he 
ought to have a chance. 

Mr. Pratt— I hope the substitute will not pre- 
vail. If the gentleman [Mr. Pope] desires the in- 
formation contemplated by the substitute, I think 
he should offer it as a separate order and move its 
reference to Sampson, Davenport & Co. ; and if 
he will do that, I will offer an order that the pho- 
tographs of all employes in City Hall be obtained, 
and move its reference to Mr. Black. The whole 
object of offering this order is simply this : It 
might be well enough— as we have never had it — 
to have before us a list of the offices of the city, 
and the amounts paid for salaries and clerk 
hire in those offices. Now, the original 
order called for nothing personal; it called 
for the names of nobody; it called simply for the 
names of the places that are filled; it does not call 
for residence; it does not call for age, sex, previ- 
ous condition of servitude. I hope the substitute, 
which I think was facetiously offered, will not 
prevail. 

Mr. Pope of Ward 14 (no objection being offered) 
amended the substitute by striking out "City 
Hall" and inserting "the various departments 
under the City Government." 

Mr. Thompson of Ward 9—1 would suggest to 
the gentleman [Mr. Popel that the substitute will 
call for the names of all the employes of the city, 
including policemen. We would have a long list 
of names in which no one would have any interest. 

Mr. Pope of Ward 14— That is just what I 
wanted. It will take in every laborer. I want to 
know how many persons there are employed in 
the City Government that do not help contribute 
to its support. I think it is time that our em- 
ployes are taken from the taxpaying citizens of 
Boston. 

Mr. Hiscock of Ward 21 moved to amend the 



39 



COMMON OOIJj^OIL 



substitute by adding; the words, "and the compara^ 
tive prices of living in 18C0 and 1877." This amend- 
ment was rejected. 

Mr. Howes of Ward 18—1 certainly trust that 
both those orders will be voted down, and that we 
shall leave the matter with the special committee 
on the subject. Take the substitute offered by 
the gentleman from Ward 14, if the committee 
are to go into the names and residences of all the 
employes of the City Government at present, it will 
take a great deal of time to find out all who might 
get $1 or f 2 a day,which might be used to far better 
advantage in investigating the departments in 
City Hall. I think it will be better to leave it to 
the judgment of the committee, instead of in- 
structing them, particularly as they have been 
hard at work and spent a good many hours each 
day upon it. The passage of the order might cause 
a division of labor, the result of which would hard- 
ly be as satisfactery as it otherwise would. 

Mr. Day of Ward 4 offered an amendment to 
the su^bstitute to insert after the words "various 
departments under the City Government" the 
words "except policemen and laborers." 

Mr. Clarke of Ward 22—1 hardly see any neces- 
sity for passing either of these orders. I would 
call the gentleman's [Mr. Thompson] attention 
to the report of the Salary Committee last year 
(City Doc. No. 22). That gives a very elaborate 
report of all the clerks employed by the city, the 
heads of departments and the clerks from i860 to 
1877. I will read for the benefit of the gentleman. 
Take the Fire Department: It gives the com- 
missioners and engineers ; one clerk of the 
board, $1500; three clerks — one .$1500. one 
$1100 and another $1000. And so it fol- 
lows out all through the departments. The 
Inspector of Milk, $1500; clerk, $500. City Regis- 
trar's office— principal clerk, assistant and clerk. 
It does not give the residences, but it seems to me 
it gives all the information that the gentleman 
requires. 

Mr. Thompson of Ward 9—1 have examined the 
document referred to by the gentleman, and it 
does not give the inforuiation I wish, nor in the 
shape I wish. It simply affects the salaries of 
those offices which the Committee on Salaries pro- 
posed to change. It does not state that it gives 
all the offices of the City Government. I want to 
get a City Government "giiide. I simply want the 
names of the different offices, and the duties at- 
tached to them. I want to know what was con- 
sidered adequate compensation for those duties 
in times past, and what is jjaid now. The docu- 
ment referred to does not give that information. 

On motion of Mr. Ruffin of Ward 9, the main 
question was ordered. 

Mr. Day's amendment was adopted. The sub- 
stitute as amended was declared adopted. Mr. 
Thompson doubted the vote; the Council divided 
—37 for, 21 against. The question was upon the 
passage of the amended substitute. 

Mr. Sampson moved the indefinite postpone- 
ment of the order. Lest, by a division— 27 for, 35 
against. 

Mr. Sampson moved to amend by adding the 
words "laborers and firemen" after "except po- 
licemen." 

Mr. Thompson moved to amend by adding "and 
a statement of the duties incumbent upon each 
office." 

Mr. Sampson's amendment was adoisted. 

Mr. Beeching of Ward 1 raised the point that 
the previous question cut off all these amend- 
ments. 

The President ruled the point well taken, and 
declared both Mr. Sampson's and Mr. Thompson's 
amendments out of order. 

The amended substitute was passed by a divi- 
sion — 37 for, 16 against. 

Mr. Webster— In order to make this action final 
I move a reconsideration, hoping it will not prevail. 

The President — The motion is not in order with- 
out a suspension of the rule. 

[For further action see later in the proceedings.] 

REGULATION OF QUACKS. 

Mr. Jackson of Ward 16 offered an order— That 
a joint special committee, consisting of three 
members of this Council, with such as the Board 
of Aldermen may join, be appointed to consider 
and report upon the expediency of applying to 
the Legislature for the passage of an act to regu- 
late the practice of medicine and pharmacy. 

The order was passed to a second reading, read 
a second time and put upon its passage. 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8—1 would like to know 
what information the gentleman is trying to de- 



rive. We have already got a Massachusetts Col- 
lege of Pharmacy, chartered by the Legi.<lature. 
It was burned out, but it is started again. So far 
as the practice of medicine is concerned, I think 
we are pretty well provided for. 

Ml'. Jackson— I want to know whether anything 
can be done to regulate the practice of medicine 
and pharmacy, in regard to the number of quacks 
practising in the city of Boston. I am aware of 
the fact that a great many people are imposed 
upon by those characters. Now, sir, I wish to 
know if there is any way toaeach them and oblige 
them to show a diploma, or prove that they are 
(juacks. That is my object. 

Mr. McGaragle— I have been unfortunate 
enough to be on a jury when a man was made a 
doctor against his will, in the smallpox time. We 
have a Committee on Legislative Matters, and I 
move the order be referred to them. 

Mr. Clarke of AVard 22—1 don't see what this 
Council has to do with this matter. I don't see 
how it affects the management of the City Gov- 
ernment that we are sent here to look after. The 
gentleman has the right, as has any other individ- 
ual in the whole city, to go to the Legislature and 
present any petition that he pleases. It will be 
referred to the proper committee of the Legisla- 
ture, and they will give him a full hearing upon 
the matter. But for the Mayor and the City Gov- 
ernment to petition the Legislature for a law in 
regard to quack doctors, or anj'thing of that kind, 
seems to me to be entirely out of the range of 
our duties. 

Mr. Webster — Is it in order now to move a sus- 
pension of the rule? 

The President— It is not. 

Mr. Pratt of Ward 21— The order is one of the 
harmless class. It certainly can do no harm to" 
appoint committees to obtain information in any 
direction. The city of Boston spends thousands 
of dollars every year in looking after the public 
health ; and whether it is expressly admitted or not, 
I suppose it is popularly admitted that amongst the 
causes of disease physicians, or those who practise 
medicine,are prominent. I imagine the gentleman 
who offered the order intended no reflection upon 
the character of all gentlemen practising as physi- 
cians in this city. But I venture to say that there 
is no class of people in the State of Massachusetts, 
and here in the city of Boston, who have such re- 
sponsibilities, and who ought to be called upon to 
be informed, and not only informed but skilled 
and instructed, in the practice and science of 
their vocation, as physicians are; and I ven- 
ture to say that there is no class that are able 
to assume the duties of their position under 
less restrictions. Now, Mr. President, it is 
well known that nogentleman can practise law as 
a lawyer^and I speak of this as an instance of the 
learnetl professions— in this State until he has 
been admitted to the bar by a court of competent 
jurisdiction; and no one is admitted to the bar 
unless he comes to it from a similar court of an- 
other State, or from some of our leading law 
schools, or passes a rigid examination by a com- 
petent board to examine him in the studies neces- 
sary to prepare him for that profession. Now, I 
am" unprepared to go into the questions 
which are suggested by the order; but I am pre- 
pared to say that for a long time I have had this 
general subject on my minu, and I hope that a 
siiecial committee may be appointed, as suggest- 
ed, to consider whether anything can be reported 
of value to this City Council on this subject. As 
I said before, it is a harmless order; it can do no 
harm, it may do a great deal of good, and I 
should like to have an investigation of the subject. 

Mr. McGaragle— The gentleman [Mr. Piattj has 
opened a field that I hardly expected he would. I 
think that a great many lawyers do not pass an 
examination. I think, that many are admitted on 
motion of some gentleman in whose office they 
have studied. I move to amend the order by in- 
serting the word "lawyers" after "physicians." I 
understood the order to call for a special commit- 
tee. 

Mr. Pratt— I think the amendment offered by 
the gentleman from Ward 8, so that the order 
should include lawyers also, is not pertinent to the 
subject and is not proper to be brought before the 
Council, fortius reason: Even if it were offered 
seriously, lawyers have nothing to do with the 
public health, and physicians have. This order 
is to inquire into the reputation of all per- 
sons practising the healing art, which is 
related so intimately to the public health. 
I think, without wishing to forestall the 
report of any committee on that subject, 



JANURAY 35, 1877 



4.0 



that if it were possible to require every per- 
son practising the healing art, or holding himself 
out to practise it, or require, at least, as the low- 
est qualification, that he should be a graduate of 
a regularly incorporated medical institution, 
which has in its curriculum a course of instruc- 
tion in anatomy, materia medica and physi- 
ology, it would be a good thing; so that 
citizens, or that part of the public who 
are strangers in the city, may have some 
guarantee, when they go to an office on which 
they see the name of a physician inviting 
them to call in his services, that the person they 
find there is learned in the science Afhich he pro- 
fesses to practise. 

Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19—1 do not know what 
this Council has to do, directly, with this matter; 
but I think it can do no harm to refer it to the 
Committee on Legislative Matters, as has been 
moved, and I hope it will be so referred. It seems 
to me, sir, there is a great deal that can be 
investigated in this matter, and that some 
such ordinance or law might be made 
which might be beneficial to the public 
health. I don't know whether it can be 
made or not. In reference to including law- 
yers, who the gentleman last up says have nothing 
to do with the public health, I think they have a 
great deal to do with it. I think it is just as bad 
to be talked to death by a lawyer^as physicked to 
death by a doctor. 

Mr. Jackson said he did not object to the refer- 
ence, and the order was referred to the Committee 
on Legislative Matters. Sent up. 

DUTIES OF CITY OFFICERS. 

Mr. Thompson of Ward 9 ofEered an order— That 
the Joint Special Committee on Salaries and Ex- 
penditures ascertain and report to the Council as 
soon as possible the nature of the duties per- 
formed by the several persons occupying salaried 
offices under the City Government. 

Read twice and put upon its passage. 

Mr. Spenceley of Ward 9 moved to amend by in- 
serting "and the physical abilities of the same." 
Rejected. 

The order was declared passed. Mr. Spenceley 
doubted the vote, the Council divided— 38 for, 
against. Sent up. 

SALARIES, NAMES AND RESIDENCES OF CITY OFFI- 
CERS. 

Mr. Webster of Ward 3—1 move a suspension of 
the rule, that I may move a reconsideration of the 
order [amended substitute] in relation to names 
of officers and their salaries. I apologize to the 
Council for not asking it before. I was not inter- 
ested in medical affairs, and had been taking a 
short nap. 

Mr. Day of Ward 4—1 hope the amendment to 
include firemen will prevail. 

The motion to suspend the rule was put. No 
quorum voted, but on a second trial it was car- 
ried. 

Mr. Webster of Ward 3 — I intended to move a 
reconsideration, hoping it would not prevail; but 
as the amendment seems reasonable, I move that 
"firemen" be included in the list not to be re- 
ported. 

Mr. Howes of Ward 18 — I suppose the gentleman 
[Mr. Webster] intended to move a reconsideration 



of the vote whereby the order to report the sal- 
aries and names of city officers was passed. I 
move the reconsideration, as the gentleman pro- 
poses to make an amendment including firemen. 

Mr. Ruffin of AVard 9 moved that the motion to 
reconsider be laid upon the table. Declared car- 
ried. Mr. Crocker of Ward 9 doubted the vote. 
The Council divided— 22 for, 33 against. 

The reconsideration prevailed, and on motion of 
Mr. Howes the order was amended by inserting 
"firemen and laborers," so that it would read 
"except policemen, firemen and laborers." 

The question was on the passage of the order as 
amended. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 10— It seems to me that 
all this is quite unnecessary. I cannot see what 
use there is in preparing a long list or catalogue 
of names of the parties who now haijpen to hold 
these offices. We have already passed an order 
referring this matter to the appropriate commit- 
tee to give us all the information upon this sub- 
ject that we desire. I have no desire for further 
information, nor do I think we can act 
more intelligently if we have the names 
of the parties inserted. The committee are 
at work upon this subject, and the order seems to 
imply that thej' should abandon their labor and 
go to work upon this. It is a matter that requires 
a large amount of time. It seems to me that we 
had better let the joint special committee report 
upon the labor that they are upon. If they do not 
furnish us information upon which we can act in- 
telligently and properly for the welfare of the 
city, then we can call upon them to give us fur- 
ther information. I hope it will not pass. 

Mr. Wilbur of Ward 20 — I move the indefinite 
postponement of the whole subject. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 16 — I raise the point of order 
that the reconsideration leaves the matter under 
the previous question. 

The President— The question on the passage of 
the order was put under an order for the previous 
question, but a motion for the previous question 
has not been made since the reconsideration. 

The motion to indefinitely postpone was lost, by 
a division— 20 for, 33 against. 

On motion of Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19, the 
main question was ordered, ana the order as 
amended was passed. Sent up. 

BRANCH LIBRARY FOR WEST ROXBURY. 

Mr. Coe of Ward 23 offered an order— That the 
Trustees of the Public Library be requested to 
consider the expediency of establishing a branch 
public library in the West Roxbury District. Re- 
ferred to Committee on Public Library. Sent up. 

UNIFORM SYSTEM OF VALUATION FOR TAXATION. 

Mr. Wilbur of Ward 20 ofEered an order, That 
his Honor the Mayor be requested, and he is here- 
by authorized, to appoint a commission to consist 
of three competent persons, citizens of Boston, 
who shall consider the subject of a plan for estab- 
lishing a system for a more uniform and equitable 
valuation of property for the purpose of taxation 
than now exists ; the expense, not exceeding $300, 
to be charged to the appropriation for Inci- 
dentals. 

Ordered to a second reading. 

Adjourned, on motion of "Mr. Hiscock of Ward 
21. 



41 



BOARD OF AJL.DER.]yLEN 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 

JANUARY 39, 1877. 



Regular meeting at four o'clock P. M., his Honor 
the Mayor presiding. 

JUBORS DEAWN. 

Thirty-two traverse jurors were drawn for the 
Superior Court, first session; and forty for the 
same court, second session. 

EXECUTIVE APPOINTMENTS. 

Special Police Officers— Members of the Com- 
mon Council. 

Constable— Joseph R. Rowe. 

Weigher of Coal— Charles H. Moseley. 

Railroad Police— W. M. Corcoran, F. W. Foster, 
W. H. Tucker, A. J. Pickens, and F. D. Coulson, 
employes of Boston & Albany Railroad Company ; 
Thomas W. Turner, F. B. Cushman, E. T. Cowell, 
S. E. Bailey, Lewis Holmes, Vernon Joslin, George 
H. Tucker, Leonard Lowell, A. C. Dupee, Charles 
H. Turner, Alphonso Davis, James O'Brien, 
James O. Bacon, William Freeman, George F. In- 

falls, Orrin A. Rogers, Alonzo F. Tuttle, Thomas 
yner, Lucius Bowman and Charles B. Shattuck, 
employes of the New York & New England Rail- 
road. 
Severally confirmed. 

PETITIONS REFEBKED. 

To the Committee on Comw.on and Public 
Grounds. Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic 
Association, for leave to erect upon the Common 
a building for their triennial exhibition ; also a 
petition of Otis Norcross and others in aid of the 
same. 

To the Committee on Licenses. Old Colony Rail- 
road Company et al., against licensing any hack 
stands at their station; Edward E. Clark, trustee, 
et al., th.aX Bedford street, near Washington street, 
be cleared of job wagons, teamsters' stands and 
pedlers ; George W. Sawin, for leave to run a pas- 
senger wagon between Cragie's Bridge and the 
India-wbarf market; Coleman & Wellington, for 
leave to run two passenger wagons from Bowdoin 
square to India wharf. 

To the Com/mittee on Common on the part of 
the Board. David H. Blaney, for the removal of a 
tree in Chelsea street, East Boston. 

To the Committee on Sewers. Wilder Bush et 
al., to be compensated for damages caused by a 
sewer in Washington street, formerly Shawmut 
avenue. 

To the Committee on Paving. William Lynch, 
for additional compensation for grade damages at 
7 and 9 EUery street. 

To the Comm-ittee on Streets on the part of the 
Board. Lyman Titus, to be paid for land taken to 
extend Clifton street. 

To the Joint Comm,ittee on Claims. Anne 
McLaughlin, to be paid for personal injuries re- 
ceived from an alleged defect in Pleasant street ; 
Maurice D. Fielding, to be compensated for per- 
sonal injuries sustained on account of an alleged 
defect in Cortes street; deputy collectors, for a 
hearing on the subject of their claim for back 
fees legally due them; James Deslion, to be re- 
funded amounts paid by him for invalid tax titles. 

To the Com,mittee on Armories. Commander of 
Ninth Battalion of Infantry, for approval of their 
headquarters at 61 Court street, and for appropri- 
ation for furniture therefor. 

To the Committee on Health on the part of the 
Board. A. M. Morrison, for leave to occupy a 
new wooden stable for one cow and two horses on 
High street, Ward 23. 

To a Special Committee, consisting of Alder- 
men Burnham and Wilder. A. G. Rockwood, for 
benefit of the Franklin Fund. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Order to sell the land and buildings known as 
the Cooper-street Armory estate. Passed. Sent 
down. 

PAPERS FBOM THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Petitions were referred in concurrence. 

Annual report of Superintendent of Public 
Lands (City Doc. No. 14); "annual report of Super- 
intendent of Sewers (City Doc. No. 13). Severally 
placed on file. 

Report referring to Board of Fire Commission- 
ers the petition of S. P. Dexter and others, for 



location of a new fire-alarm box in Ward 24. Ac- 
cepted in concurrence. 

An order for Trustees of the Public Library to 
consider the expediency of establishing a branch 
library in West Roxbury, came up referred to the 
Committee on the Public Library. Concurred. 

An order for Inspector of Buildings to report 
upon the expediency of making alterations for 
better egress in the several schoolhouses, came up 
referred to the Committee on Public Buildings. 
Concurred. 

An order for a joint special committee to report 
on the expediency of an application to the Legis- 
lature for an act "to regulate the practice of med- 
icine and pharmacy," came up referred to the 
Committee on Legislative Matters. Concurred. 

Order for Committee on Common, etc., to ex- 
pend an additional sum of twelve hundred dollars 
for labor on public grounds. Passed in concur- 
rence. 

Order for Superintendent of Health to make 
contracts for purchase of hay, grain, horses, ex- 
changes and materials. Passed in concurrence. 

An order to furnish the Social Law Library two 
copies of the Revised Ordinances and other publi- 
cations of the city, as therein specified, came up. 
Referred to the Committee on Printing. Con- 
curred. 

Order for City Engineer to make purchases of 
supplies, instruments and drawing materials, and 
to incur other necessary expenses. Passed in con- 
currence. 

REDUCTION OF SALARIES AND EXPENSES— COST 
OF GAS. 

An order came up for the Joint Special Commit- 
tee on Salaries, etc., to report the names of all 
persons employed in the various departments of 
the City Government, except police, laborers and 
firemen, with the place of residence of each ; the 
amount of salary paid at the present tim,e, also 
the amount paid in 1360, etc. 

The question was on concurrence. 

Alderman O'Brien — I really doubt the propriety 
of passing that order. The Special Committee 
on Salaries and Expenditures have about as much 
as they can attend to, and it appears to me that if 
they go into the matter covered by that order, it 
will occupy a great deal of their time and their 
report will be delayed. I should think it would 
maKe almost a volume in itself to publish a list of 
the employes under the City Government, and a 
statement of their duties; and I hope the subject 
will be indefinitely postponed and the committee 
be allowed to go on as they have commenced, and 
get ready to report as early as possible. If they 
are lumbered up with work of this kind it will take 
a very long time to make up their report. I move 
the indefinite postponement of the order — or I 
move to lay it upon the table if that would be 
more acceptable. 

Alderman Thompson— I am somewhat surprised 
to hear a member of that committee make the 
statement that the committee have as much as 
they can attend to. It seems to me that if the 
committee would confine themselves to what prop- 
erly belongs to their duties they would not be 
overburdened with more than they can attend to. 
Mr. Mayor, it has become a custom, to a certain 
extent, for members of this branch who are dis- 
satisfied with certain things to complain in the 
form of an interview through the public press, 
without taking the responsibility of their com- 
plaints. Now, as I have reason to complain of 
certain members of this Board and|the Cfty Coun- 
cil, I propose to come out and express my com- 
plaints without going behind and expressing 
them in an annonymous communication. I have 
on my desk the following communication, which 
I will read— I only saw this about five minutes ago : 

City of Boston, i 

Office of the Clebk of Committees, V 

City Hall, Jan. 26, 1877. ) 

Dear Sir — I am directed by the Joint Special 
Committee on the Reduction of Municipal Ex- 
penses to request you to inform them, at your 
earliest convenience, whether, in your opinion, 
the price of gas furnished for lighting the streets 
will be reduced during the present year. The 
committee are lead to make this inquiry for the 
reason that they have received a proposal for 
lighting the streets, by other means than gas, for 
a much less sum than it will cost if the present 
rates are maintained, and, if they are assured that 
there is no prospect of a reduction in the price of 
gas, they are disposed to recommend to the City 



JAN TJARY 39 



Irt 77 



43 



Council the adoption of the system referred to. 
A.n early reply will oblige, 

Respectfully yours, 

William H. Lee, 
Clerk of Committee. 
R. J. Monks, Esq., Treasurer South Boston Gas 
. Light Company. 

Mr. Mayor, that is under date of Jan. 26. On 
the 18th of JaEuary the Committee on Lamps had 
a meeting and nassed a vote directing the Super- 
intendent of Lamps to write as follows: 

Lamp Department Office, ) 
Boston, Jan. 18, 1877. | 

To the President and Directors of the South 
Boston Gas Co. : Gentlemen — At a meeting of the 
Committee on Lamps held this day, after taking 
into full consideration the price paid for gas for 
the public lighting in the several sections of the 
city, they were unanimously of the opinion that 
an immediate reduction in price should be made 
by the corporation which you represent. 

I am instructed by the committee to commu- 
nicate to you this fact and ask an early and favor- 
able reply to their request. 

Yours respectfully, 

George H. Allen, 
Superintendent of Lamps. 

That is dated Jan. 18th. The reply of the presi- 
dent of the company is dated Jan. 20th, 1877 — that 
is live days prior to the date of the communica- 
tion from the Committee on the Reduction of 
Salaries : 

Boston, Jan. 20th, 1877. 

Geor(/e U. Allen, Esq., Superintendent Lamps, 
City Hall, Boston : Dear Sir— Your letter address- 
ed to the president and directors of the South 
Boston Gas Light Company receivea. 

The board will meet next Thursday, and I will 
lay the matter of reduction in the price of gas 
furnished street lamps before them and report 
the result. 

Y^ours truly, 

Richard J. Monks, 

Agent and Treasurer, 
South Boston Gas Light Company. 

Now, Mr. Mayor, what I complain of is, if not 
the want of courtesy with which the Committee 
on Lamps have been treated by that communica- 
tion, the want of confidence. And this is not the 
first time that it has been shown to the Commit- 
tee on Lamps. There was also an anonymous 
communication published in one of the public 
prints the other day inferring, and expressing, a 
want of confidence in that committee ; and as a 
member of that committee for the second year — 
having been promoted to the chairmanship 
of it in consequence of no other member 
being reelected — I feel that if it is the 
feeling of the members of this Board 
that the present committee is not com- 
petent to take charge of its duties, the soon- 
er we know it the better; and if that is the feel- 
ing we had better resign. But, sir, I do not pro- 
pose to have any other committee, subsequently 
appointed, to interfere with the duties of that 
committee while I am its head. If the special 
committee propose to look into the matter of 
lamps, I commend them for a desire to reduce ex- 
penses; but when the proper committee is attend- 
ing to that matter, I propose to tell the members 
of the special committee that I object, and I do 
so openly, without going behind in the public 
prints and expressing it in that manner ; and that 
is what I complain of. If the regular committee 
is going to manage the matter of lamps and the 
lighting of the streets to the best of their ability, 
I don't think it is proper for any other committee 
to interfere with them. You might with the same 
propriety go to the parties who are building 
sewers and say that they must build sewers for 
less than they are charging for them; and to the 
parties who are clearing the streets of rubbish, 
and say to them that they must do it for less. It 
seems to me that this thing belongs to the regular 
committee. If members of the Special Salary 
Committee de.sire any information upon this sub- 
ject I am ready to give it to them ; and there is 
where they should come for any information in 
regard to a reduction of the price' of gas or of any 
articles used by that department. 

Alderman Fitzgerald— I am chairman of the 
Special Committee on Salaries and Expenditures. 
I have never seen that communication before, but 
I know that a communication of that kind— per- 
haps not so strong as that— was sent to the gas 
companies; but we never dreamed of treading 
upon anybody's corns. I assure the gentleman 



that we never intended to interfere with the Com- 
mittee on Lamps in what we propose to do. We 
have enough work to perform, and did not intend 
to trench upon the domain of the Committee on 
Lamps. We wanted to find out whether the gas 
could not be furnished at a cheaper rate than it is 
furnislied by the gas comijanies- that is the sum 
and substance of it. The committee did not intend 
to make a price for gas, but we intend to embody in 
our report — and I have no doubt we will, although 
my friend objects to it — the cost of gas and the 
cost of everything in the City Goveinment, and 
the fact whether tliat cost can be reduced. That 
is the reason we sent this communication, and we 
intend to send communications wherever we can 
get information. Whether it trenches upon other 
committees or not we intend to send communicar 
tions wherever we can get information that will 
tend to reduce salaries or appropriations; but we 
did n't intend to insult any committee. Our du- 
ties are laborious; we have worked very hard and 
shall Vie very glad when the work is done. If we 
have been a little too zealous the gentleman 
should not find fault with that. 

Alderman O'Brien— It seems to me that the Al- 
derman from Chailestown went far out of his way 
to go to South Boston to inquire about gas. If 
the clerk attended to his duties, I presume that the 
Charlestown Gas Company had precisely the same 
communication, and so did all the gas companies 
in the city. It is true we did not have the Com- 
mittee on Lamps bef\jieus; but we did have the 
Superinteiulent of Lamps before us, and of course 
we had to ask him a great many questions about 
the working; of his department, the cost of run- 
ning it, and about salaries. The cost of gas for 
the city of Boston will amount to something like 
.•8500,000 the coming year. Let me read a para- 
graph from the report of the Superintendent of 
Lamps : 

"In addition to the large number of entire new 
lamps located during the past year, all the old 
fluid lamps have been discontinued, new iron 
posts and brackets located, with new lanterns, in 
which have been placed the most approved kero- 
sene burner; thereby increasing the light on 
streets and places where they are located almost 
to the brilliancy of gas lighting." 

Well, it was legitimate for the committee to in- 
quire what was the cost of a light almost equal to 
gaslight, and the committee were staggered when 
they found that $2.50,000 could be saved by that 
operation alone. I want to give to the gas compa- 
nies all the credit they deserve; but it is a ques- 
tion whether the city of Boston cannot manufac- 
ture its gas, or use some other material for light- 
ing its streets, and it was perfectly legitimate for 
the committee to go into this inquiry and embrace 
all those matters in their report. 

Alderman Thompson— The Alderman says the 
cost of gas this year will be about $500,000. I 
would like to know where he gets that infoima- 
tion. That is about as correct as the statement 
that there will be a saving of $250,000 by this new 
process which has been tried by several of our 
surrounding cities and towns and discarded. It 
is all nonsense— this saving on the cost of gas. 
Gas can be manufactured for a certain price, and 
when you get below that it cannot be done, and 
will not be done. I do not propose at this time to 
go into the cost of gas, but at the proper time I 
think I can convince this Board with facts and 
figures that will be satisfactory to them. But 
wliat I complain of is that a duplicate letter, on 
the same matter, should be sent to the same par- 
ties that I communicated with. The Alderman 
referred to my going to South Boston. I have not 
been to South Boston. I find these communica- 
tions from South Boston coming before me, car- 
rying out the same thing that I c^ommenced. That 
is what I complain of. The superintendent of the 
Gas Company is no doubt astonished, having 
these communications from two different commit- 
tees ; and he sends them both to me with his 
reply. That is what I complain of. It seems to 
me that he should answer to the Superintendent 
of Lamps, as he has said in his communication. 

Alderman O'Brien— I really believe that the 
chairman of the Lamp Committee had better drop 
in at the next meeting of the Special Committee 
on Salaries and Expenditures, and perhaps we 
might give him some information. We saw fit to 
ask the Superintendent of Lamps how much he 
(;an cut down the expenses of his department this 
coming year, and he said he could not cut them 
down one copper; and he said the reason was be- 
cause tliey had been increasing the number of gas- 
lights in the suburbs, in the city proper and on the 



43 



BOARD OP ALDEKJMEN, 



Public Garden to an enormous extent, and that 
every gaslight erected in the city of Boston costs 
the city fifty dollars a year. It costs the citizens 
of Boston fifty dollars a year for every gaslight. 
The expense last year was $500,000, and the ex- 
pense this year will be over $500,000 unless the gas 
companies see fit in their judgment to reduce the 
price of gas. 

Alderman Fitzgerald— I do not intend to enter 
into any discussion of the relative merits of the 
gas advocated by my friend here [Alderman 
O'Brien], or that advocated by my friend from 
Charlestown. But I wish to state that we did not 
intend to insult the Committee on Lamps by the 
communication which we sent to the South Bos- 
ton and other gas companies. I am glad that the 
Committee on Lamps have sent their communica- 
tion to the company, and I hope the chairman 
■will inform us what the nature of the information 
contained in the reply is. Whether this artificial 
gas is better than the gas now used is for the 
Board to decide and not for us. 

Alderman O'Brien— I do not mean to say that I 
advocate any particular kind of gas for lighting 
our streets. We merely took the report of the Su- 
perintendent of Lamps and asked him questions 
about tlie different methods, and we are getting 
all the Information upon that subject that we can. 
When we find a method of lighting our streets at 
f 25 a year that is almost equal in brilliancy togas- 
light at $50 a year, I think it is a legitimate sub- 
ject of inquiry. 

Alderman Thompson — I do not propose to dis- 
cuss the subject of gas, but I do wish aentlemen, 
in discussing this subject, to confine themselves 
to the facts. These lamps cost $26 a year, and the 
gas lamps cost $30 — quite a percentage of differ- 
erence from the cost stated by the Alderman. 
Now the gentleman speaks of the saving of $250,- 

000 a year by the adoption of this plan. The state- 
ment is so extravagant that I hardly think it 
worth while to answer it. But perhaps he thinks 
it is wise to fix a limit upon the price to be paid 
the gas companies, and perhaps cause an advance 
in the price to the citizens generally. Under the 
present system that he talks about saving •'$2.50,000 
a year, these same companies pay back over 
$200,000 to the city in taxes. It is possible 
that the gentleman might advocate the in- 
troduction of gas works and the manu- 
facture of gas by the city itself, when we 
have a report from a commission appointed to 
look into this matter, and they say that no city is so 
well treated as Boston, where they are charged .$2, 
while in New York the price is .f 2.50 per 1000 feet; 
and in Philadelphia, where this beautiful proposi- 
tion, that the city manufacture its own gas, origi- 
nated, it costs $2.15, and where coal is five cents 
less a ton than in Boston. And I might add that 
among the items of the annual rejDort are $2300 
for matches, and all those corrupt things. The 
Alderman may recommend this thing here, but I 
don't think this question — 

The May"r— The Chair would remind the Board 
that the question is on the motion to lay on the 
table, and it is not debatable. 

Alderman O'Brien— I am aware of that fact, but 

1 should like to say one word more. The Superin- 
tendent of Lamps says the averagejcost of lamps 
in the city is $50 a year, and in the suburbs more — 

. sometimes $50 or $60. The average cost of this 
light he believes will be $26 a year. That is official 
from the Superintendent of Lamps. The gentleman 
also speaks of $200,000 that the gas companies pay 
to the city in taxes. That is about as absurd as the 
other statement. I hold in my hand the exact 
amounts paid in taxes by the different gas compa- 
nies : — 

Value of Tax in 

Property. 1876. 

Boston Gaslight Company S3,952,60"0 gS50,198.02 

Brookline " " 43,000 546.10 

Charlestown" " 467,200 5,933.44. 

Dorchester " '" 244,500 3,105.15 

East Boston " " 207',300 2,632.71 

Jamaica Pl'n '• " 98,700 1,253.69 

Koxhurv " " 721,000 9,156.70 

South Boston" " 390,300 4,956.81 

Total 86,124,600 877,782.42 

■ That is an official document from the Assessors' 
Department. 

Alderman Thompson —I am compelled to reply 
to the gentleman. I still assert and will prove that 
a lamp costs but thirty dollars a year in the city 
proper. I maintain that, and he cannot point to a 
page where the Superintendent of Lamps makes 
the statement made by the Alderman. And in 
regard to the amount of taxes paid into the city 



treasury by the gas companies, I still maintain 
that it is two hundred thousand dollars. The 
Alderman takes what is paid into the treasury 
here ; he does not put to the credit of that account 
the amount received by the State on the stock, 
that is refunded. I think 1 have investigated this 
subject pretty fully, and every statement I have 
made I will substantiate. 

Alderman Fitzgerald — I raise the point of order 
that this discussion is out of order. We have some 
other business to attend to. 

The order was laid upon the table. 

An order came up for the Special Committee on 
Salaries and Exijenditures to report also the na- 
ture of the duties performed by the several per- 
sons occupying salaried offices under the City Gov- 
ernment. Laid on the table on motion of Alder- 
man O'Brien. 

I'OLANl) & PEABODY'S OMNIBUS LINE. 

The Board took up the special assignment, viz. : 
Hearing on petition of Poland & Peabody for 
leave to run an omnibus line from Dorchester 
street, near Ninth street. South Boston, through 
certain streets of the city proper to the northern 
railroad stations. 

Petitions in aid of the petition of Poland & Pea- 
body were received from Thomas Manning and 112 
others, Thomas Gogin and 112 others, L. C. Whid- 
den and 110 others, J. Simmons and 108 others, 
James B. Call and 84 others, F. P. Chase and 109 
others, James Carr and .53 others, W. W. Viles and 
110 others, James A. Parker and 107 others, Frank 
Campbell and 108 others, Thomas Blake and 54 
others, John O. Dariowand 112 others, John W. 
Savery and 56 others, Benjamin Hanson and 55 
others, George W. Kingman and 113 others, Wil- 
liam B. Woodman and 93 others. 

P. A. Collins appeared for the petitioners, Ben- 
jamin Dean for the remonstrants. 

Mr. Collins stated that the petitioners wished to 
start from between Eighth and Ninth streets on 
Dorchester street and go via Broadway, Albany 
street, Kingston, Summer, Hawley and Milk 
streets to Devonshire street, and thence to New 
AVashingtou street to the depots and return via 
Tremont, Bromfield, Boylston, Washington, Beach 
and Albany streets. This is a new route, and the 
fare proposed is five cents. The only competitor 
is the South Boston Railroad. They propose to 
accommodate a large number of peo"ple in South 
Boston who are not now accommodated. Mr. Col- 
lins then called the witnesses for the petitioners. 

Frederick T. Peabody, one of the petitioners, 
said the time foi a trip would take about thirty- 
five minutes; they intend to start at once; thought 
from inquiries that there was business enough for 
both horse railroads and stages. [Cross-examined 
by Mr. Dean.] Had been in the furniture busi- 
ness, and never been engaged in transportation; 
had figures made of cost of stabling, etc. ; been 
figuring on them for four months ; estimate about 
$3.50 a week for a horse, and stable rent from 
$1500 to $1800 for 100 horses per year; can hire or 
buy the land and build a stable; got no refusals 
for sale or lease of land; estimate cost of coach, 
about $1200 or $1500: estimate six horses for each 
coach at $90 each; .$65 or $70 for two sets 
of double harnesses for each coach; figured 
on about seven men in stable and one drivei for 
each coach; has no means himself. [To Mr. Col- 
lins.] He and his partner have means to build the 
stable and buy the coaches. Intend to begin at 
six o'clock and run fifteen coaches, every seven or 
eight minutes. 

George E. Poland, one of the petitioners, said 
they had ample means to start the route. [To Mr. 
Dean.] Can get $50,000; am shipper in grocery 
store and am in teaming business" at the High- 
lands; no one else interested. 

Colonel H. W. Wi'sou, civil engineer, had made 
surveys of the proposed route for petitioners. 
From Dorchester street to Scollay square is 214 
miles, and to Fitchburg depot makes in all 2.93 
miles. From Dorchester street' to said depot, by 
the route proposed, is 13,560 feet, or 2.58 miles. It 
usually takes forty-five to fifty minutes to go from 
Dorchester street to the Fitchburg depot ; while 
the red-line stages go from Lenox street to said 
depot in about thirty-three minutes. The petition- 
ers could go over their proposed route in about 
thirty-two minutes. Since 1858 the only accommo- 
dation South Boston has had has been the horse 
railroad; the population has grown from 15,000 to 
60,000., Since Broadway Bridge was built there 
has been a strong current of travel over 
it; and it would be a saving of time to come to 
the northern depots by that route, and there is 



JANUARY 



c> 



9, 1877. 



44. 



not the same liability to interruption as by the 
other bridges. Did not assume to say it would ac- 
commodate all the people oi South Boston. [To 
Mr. Dean.] Whatever impairs the facilities of the 
railroad is not a public benefit. The proposed line 
will go through the most populous part of South 
Boston, and from a point where the railroad 
company have started a separate line. Had 
not figured the length of the line re- 
turning; thinks it would be in lavor of 
the railroad company returning, as it is 
a trifle longer than the incoming route. [To Alder- 
man Clark.] Such as they are, on the line of the 
proposed route, the present accommodations are 
very good. If it should diminish the horse rail- 
road accommodations it would not be a public 
convenience. The greatest drawback they have 
in South Boston is that they have only one line of 
communication; they want communication direct 
with the South End and the Highlands. [To Mr. 
Dean.] The South Boston road once got a loca- 
tion to cross Dover-street Bridge, but were en- 
.ioined, because of the need of a law allowing a 
crossing of tide water. [To Alderman Burnham.] 
Almost any route will accommodate a class of 
people, if it went to a new point; a 'line over 
Swett street would be a great accommo- 
dation, though perhaps not profitable. [To Mr. 
Collins.] Think this route will be largely patron- 
ized. [To Mr. Fitzgerald.] It costs eight cents 
from South Boston by horse cars to the northern 
depots. [To Mr. Dean.] It will be a great accom- 
modation if they can have the proposed extension 
of the South Boston horse cars to the northern 
depots. There is a continuous stream of cars 
connecting with each other. [To Alderman Fitz- 
gerald.] Think there has been a marked improve- 
ment in the Metropolitan and Highland cars, but 
there haa not been the same improvement in the 
South Boston cars. [To Alderman Wilder.] Should 
think the proposed omnibus line would pav- [To 
Alderman Burnham.] Don't think it would de- 
tract from the patronage of the railroad: he 
would not ride in a coach when there was a car. 

William W. Nichols, for thirty years a resident 
of South Boston, gave as the principal reason for 
granting the petition the need the people have of 
better transportntion facilities. The route is new, 
especially out of South Boston. If they had a 
competing line it would help them. Accommoda- 
tion in the cars is difficult to get morning and 
evening. He would sign a petition for a new rail- 
road there. Competition has been a benefit to 
the people of the Highlands, and it would be the 
same to South Boston. All the South Boston peo- 
ple, except the stockholders in the railroad, 
want the stages. AVould take stock in a 
new road, or in this stage line. Knew 
of people who walk because there are not cars 
enough; particularly so morning and evening. 
Think South Boston is left out in the cold. [To 
Mr. Dean.] The people were pretty well satisfied 
with the railroad at first; the road has increased 
its facilities very much during the past three 
years; but nearly all the cars have been taken off 
the Milk-street route, and it has not proved so 
much of an accommodation as was at first ex- 
pected. It is no sort of use at present. 
The South Boston road runs four-horse time 
long after the other roads stop it. [To Alderman 
Fitzgerald.] Have not noticed the same improve- 
ments on the South Boston cars that have been 
made on the other roads. The establishment of a 
rival line would have the same effect that the 
Highland road has had; and an omnibus line will 
have the same effect. Should think the cars run 
every three or five minutes to Dorchester street. 
The new cars are good, but the old ones are badly 
ventilated and not what they should be. 

Augustus Russ said he frequently had occasion 
to go to South Boston, and thought such a line 
would unquestionably give additional facilities 
for travel; and if any man has the cai)ital and 
enterprise to start a line, he ought to be Rllowed 
to do so. [To Alderman Clark.] Think it would 
not be for the interest of South Boston to grant a 
charter to an irresponsible party. [To Alderman 
O'Brien.] It would seem proper to ask something 
in return for the privilege, and the Board should 
consider whether they should put it up to the low- 
est bidder on the rate of fare. 

Josiah Dunham had lived in South Boston fifty 
or sixty years; favored all possible facilities ; the 
route over Broadway Bridge would ^e a great 
accommodation, and one over lAver-street 
Bridge would be still greater. The proposed 
coach line would be a great public convenience. 
The South Boston cars often come along so 



heavily laden that people cannot get on. [To Al- 
derman Fitzgerald.] Don't think South Boston 
cars have come up to the standard of the other 
roads; a competing line would make the road give 
better cars, without lessening their income. [To 
Alderman Burnham.] Think it would be better to 
have this line go on Fourth street than on Broad- 
way ; would pay better on some of the off streets. 

Moses H. Libby, real estate agent on Broadway, 
thought the railroad company gave good accom- 
modations in the middle of the day, but not in 
the morning and evening. The iiew line will be a 
great benefit, and open up real estate not built 
upon. 

Mr. Collins said they had 1890 petitioners in aid 
of this petition, and he would not take up the time 
of the Board by cumulative evidence. He then 
read a statement of teams, foot passengers, etc,, 
passing over the South Boston bridges in 1869, 
taken by him. He thought the percentage of in- 
crease since about 20 per cent. 

To Alderman Fitzgerald, Mr. Collins said the pe- 
tition was bona fide ; the petitioners see money in 
it, and are willing to have the franchise condi- 
tioned that it shall not be alienated. To Alderman 
Slade, Mr.CoUins said that fifteen coaches will ac- 
commodate very many people ; he frequently had 
to walk home because of the ill-ventilated, crowded 
cars. They do not have pure air when they get 
twenty passengers in a South Boston car.' [To 
Alderman Robinson.] A round trip will take about 
an hour and four minutes. 

The witnesses for the remonstrants were next 
called by Mr. Dean. 

J. C. Gipson said he ran twenty-five coaches 
from South Boston to northern depots, from 1842 
to 1859, and started the cars in 1858. They ran the 
stages over Dover-street Bridge and down Harri- 
son avenue. Ran the coaches at six-cent fare and 
could n't get enough to pay expenses. The rail- 
road run off the coaches. The cost of such a line 
per coach would be between $2200 and |2300; don't 
know what . kind of a horse Mr. Feabody would 
buy at $90. Am present superintendent of 
the South Boston Railroad. Think neither 
company would make a dollar if this line 
is est.abiished. The railroad intends to give all 
the accommodation required. Have 447 horses, 
run 51 cars ; their facilities have considerably in- 
creased during three years, and there has been 
a constant decrease in passengers since 1874. Ex- 
tra cars are put on morning and night, when they 
are crowded for an hour or an hour and a half. 
The petitioners cannot make their proposed round 
trip in an hour and four minutes. It took his 
coaches an hour and a half to make the trip to the 
depots from City Point, which is the same distance 
as from Washington Village. [To Mr. Collins.] 
The omnibus line paid enough to keep it in repair, 
but he never made a dollar out of it. Don't know 
what coaches cost today, but bases his estimate 
on what Mr. Hathorne says. Am not familiar 
with how the South Boston road stands compared 
to the MetroiJolitan and Highland roads in regard 
to horses. Since 1874 they have built a stable, 
f 75,000 ; bought land, $6000 or $8000; rebuilt burned 
stable, over $100,000; built eight new cars list year 
and two the year before. Average 71/2 per cent, 
dividend a year; borrowed the money to build a 
stable with. The population is four times as 
great as when his coaches were aban- 
doned. Have good ventilation on the 
cars ; it goes right out of the top of the cars in the 
centi'e — looks like a sign. People within the car 
want the ventilators closed. [To Mr. Dean.] The 
opening of the ventilators is left to the discretion 
of the conductors. Have lettei'S almost every day 
that there is too miTch ventilation in the cars. [To 
Alderman Clark.] Fifteen omnibuses would aver- 
age ninety trips of an hour and a quarter each a 
day; the coaches would average six trips apiece. 
[To Mr. Dean.] A set of car harnesses costs $50. 

George O. Baker, clerk of superintendent of 
South Boston road, stated how the cars run from 
5..30 A. M. to 12 P. M. on the Broadway and Bay 
View lines ; making 449 trips a day on two-horse 
time; mornings and evenings they run mostly 
two minutes apart. They crowd all the cars on 
they can between 4 and G P. M., when there is the 
rush of travel. Since 1871 the cars have increased 
from 41 to 55 in 1875, and 53 in 1876; now runnini;' 
51 cars. They have been building cars continual- 
ly ; the entire number now being 58 box cars and 
12 open ones. The cars are run about ;'M feet 
apart in the busiest times. Since No. 33 the cars 
have been all of the modern pattern, and are in- 
tended to be kept as clean as any. [To Mr. Collins.] 
Run 433 trips today, or 367 by Dorchester street. 



45 



B O A ii U OF A L 3J K R ]S1 E N , 



From statements made by the witness the fol- 
lowing statistics in relation to the opei'ations of 
the South Boston road are compiled : 

Year. yo. of trips. Total receipts Average receipts 
for year. per trip. 

1873 119,616 »287,816.35 #2.41 

1874 134,738 317,264.05 2.35 

1875 143,289 304,545.85 2.13 

1876 155,626 295,626.89 1.90 

In 1872 the average receipts per trijt were jp2.39; 
in 1871, $2.38; in 1870, $2.36; in 1809, $2.31 ; in 1869, 
.$2.10; in 1867, $2.19. There were 12,000 more trips 
in 1876 than in 1875, and the receipts were $9000 
less, and twenty-three cents a triji less. In 1876, 
when the rec;eipts were smallest, the number of 
trips were the largest. The indications are of a 
further decrease in 1877. In 1875 the company had 
388 horses. They have more horses now than ever 
before. The passengers have more accommoda- 
tions than ever before, though the receipts have 
been decreasing. [To Mr. Collins.] Extra cars are 
run to the Old Colony depots on Sunday mornings. 
The road's facilities have been increased for the 
last three or foui' years. Last year there was con- 
siderable investigation about the management of 
the road, and they expect to do better when times 
get better. 

J. B. Crosby, president of the Soxith Boston 
road, verified Mr. Baker's statistics. The compa- 
ny has paid between $47,000 and $50,000 in paving 
the streets since the road commenced; paving re- 
pans for the last five years have averaged $1000 a 
month, or a total of $60,000. The company intend 
to give the public the fullest accommodation con- 
sistent with the receipts and pay a reasonable in- 
terest on the investment. If the omnibus line is 
put on they would nave to decrease the num- 
ber of cars. The omnibuses will only accommo- 
date a small locality outside of the line of the 
road; and the only effect would be to divide the 
present patronage between two lines. South Bos- 
ton is full of people of small means, who are out 
of employment, or have had salaries reduced, and 
who cannot afford to ride. The snow expenses 
have been enormous; kept sixteen sleds with a 
large force of shoveleis; all the snow force is hired 
outside of the road stock. 

Mr. Baker being recalled, said the average extra 
expense of removing snow this winter was $243 
per day, $6804 for twenty-eight days. 

Henry Souther, formerly president of the South 
Boston road, said the company accommodates the 
people as well as it can with the routes it has. 
They have kept fully up, and rather ahead, of the 
call for accommodations. We used to consider 
the character of our cars as good as any three 
years ago; but since the competition with the 
Highland and Metropolitan we have fallen a little 
behind. [To Mr. Collins.] I usually walk ; keep 
a private carriage; own no stock at all in the road; 
ride in the cars once or twice a week. 

Gilbert Wait, for forty years a resident in South 
Boston, on Broadway, between E and F streets, 
said that when the cars first started they were as 
good as any ; they are better than some of the Metro- 
politan Company today; the accommodations are 
as good as the road could provide for its route. 
[To Mr. Collins.] Have no stock in the road. 

Benjamin James said he had resided forty-five 
years in South Boston ; am a stockholder and di- 
rector in the South Boston Railroad; think the ac- 
commodations are fully up to the times. [To Mr 
Collins.] Do not remember that it took a long- 
time to get the road to sell twenty tickets for a 
dollar. 

Charles E. Paige confirmed the statements of 
jjrevious witnesses as to the accommodations fur- 
nished by the railroad. It is hard to please every- 
body, especially in regard to ventilation. [To Mr. 
Collins] Am stockholder in the road. 

This closed the testimony for the remonstrants. 

Mr. Dean then argued the case for the remon- 
strants. The general question was whether it will 
be dealing fairly with the South Boston road to 
grant the license; but by the evidence the ques- 
tion is reduced to this, whether thoy should aid 
two young men desirous of going into busi- 
ness. He reviewed the testimony in regard to 
the business done by the railroad, which he pre- 
tended was crippled in its resources; which has 
paid $1000 a month in paving the streets for five 
years. If the road does its duty fairly with the 
jjeople, is it fair to cripple the company ? The 
omnibus line will not pave any streets. If the 
streets are open to all, let them be open to the 
railroad without cost. The cars will be crowded, 
and the cars necessary to give every one a seat 
would swamp any corporation. Can the omnibus 



double up so as to give all a seat? The horse rail- 
road is the best means of travel now known; 
but it anything else comes up, their property 
is all gone. The idea of benefit from rail- 
road competition has been exploded long ago ; the 
public have to support it or it goes up, and the ad- 
dition of stages IS but so much addition to the ex- 
pense on the public. The public convenience is 
not subserved by requiring them to pay for infe- 
rior accommodations. The establishment of rail- 
ways gave relief to the streets from rhe jams of 
coaches and teams; and in winter the streets were 
almost nnpassable. Thanks to the roads, if a 
snow occurs the streets are in good condition for 
the fire engines to pass along without 
serious obstruction. The petitioners have 
no particular interest in South Boston, and 
is it fair, is there any exigency requiring 
the establisement of this line, after the 
city had taken the company's money in the paving 
of streets. He concluded by referring to the peti- 
tion of the company for leave to run to the north- 
ern depots, and the issuing of commutation 
tickets, as evidence of its intention to fairly dis- 
charge its obligations to the ijublic. He also read 
from the <}ocuments in this same case last year to 
show that many signed the petitions in aid not 
intending to reflect on the South Boston road. 

Mr. Collins, in closing lor the petition- 
ers, said the horse railroads endeavored to 
prevent the commutation system, and the 
seven-cent system was opposed by them all. 
Horse railroads combine lor mutual protection 
against the interest of the public. These 
patitions are signed by over 2000 residents of South 
Boston, who desire more accommodations. They 
are one-sixth of the people of Boston, and yet are 
wholly dependent on one hoise-railroad corpora- 
tion, which has done as well, perhaps, as could be 
expected under the circumstances. But a corpo- 
ration cannot do as well as a private firm, for the 
latter do not have to hire a president, superin- 
tendent, clerks, etc. If two men owned the South 
Boston road the people would be better accommo- 
dated. He did not wish to reflect on the manage- 
ment of the South Boston, for that road had re- 
flected on itself, as the public prints had shown. 
The company had spent $50,000 in paving the 
streets, but they had had the special privilege 
of- tearing up the streets and placing their tracks 
there. He reviewed the result of establishing the 
Highland road, claiming that both the Highland 
and Metropolitan railroads had made money; the 
Metropolitan stock is much improved, and they 
have more civil conductors and more sober 
drivers; while at the same time Mr. Hathorne is 
running his coaches all the time in opposition and 
making money too. Mr. Collins humorously 
alluded to Mr. Gipson's competition with himself 
and passed to a comparison of the growth 
of that section of the city with the facili- 
ties, contending that the increase had not 
been commeusui-ate. The railroads do not have 
a vested or sacred right to use any street; even 
their tracks are used by other roads. The people 
need more accommodations. The petitioners 
know what they can do; have measured the route. 
The city ought not to refuse this privilege to a 
firm who will accommodate the public. Both 
lines will prosper, for there is business enough for 
both. Competition creates business and makes 
the party, who was in it before, do it better. The 
railroad companies spend a great deal of money 
in clearing snow from their tracks in order to 
keep from going on runners. The petitioners 
want to serve a public who have asked them to 
do it. 

Mr. Dean called attention to the management 
of.the railroad, which could not be more economi- 
cal. The salaiies amount to .$7000 — President 
$1500, superintendent $2500, treasurer $2000, su- 
uerinteudent's clerk $1000. 

On motion of Alderman Fitzgerald the petition 
was recommitted to the Committee on Licenses. 

JAIL EXPENSES. 

A re(iuisition for $2021.69 was received from the 
Sheriff for expenses at the county jail for Janu- 
ary. Read and approved. 

POLICE DEPABTHEMT. 

Alderman Robinson submitted the following 
from the Committee on Police : 

Ordereda-That the Chief of Police be directed 
to take sua > measures as may be necessary to pre- 
vent persons from loitering in the corridors or 
passageways or upon the stairs of City Hall, in 
order that citizens having business to transact at 



^JANUARY ^9. 18 77. 



46 



the several offices in tlie building may have fr^e 
access thereto. * ; 

Alderman O'Brien— It appeairs to' me that I 
should like to have that order lie over for a week 
for our consideration. A great many people come 
up here to present their petitions for positions in 
the Paving, Police and other departments, and I 
think it would be bad to drive them away, if that 
is the intention of the order. 

Alderman Robinson— That is not, as I under- 
stand, the object of the ordej. There are a great 
many, as I understand, who come here and fill the 
corridors and stairs, and prevent people from com- 
ing and doing the very thing that the Alderman 
says. 

The order went over under the rule. 

Ordered, That the Committee on Police be au- 
thorized to purchase, from time to time, such fur- 
niture and supplies as may be required for the use 
of the Police Department; the expense to be 
charged to the appropriation for Police. 

Ordered, That the Committee on Police be au- 
thorized to make such arrangements as they may 
deem expedient for keeping the horses used in the 
Police Department; the expense to be charged to 
the appropriation for Police. 

Severally read once. 

Ordered, That the Committee on Police be au- 
thorized to make such i-epalrs as may be neces- 
sary for the care and preservation of the several 
police stations and the police steamboat; the ex- 
pense to be charged to the appropriation for 
Police. 

Alderman Fitzgerald said the making of repairs 
was hardly within the province of the Committee 
on Police, and called attention to the fact that an 
order had already been passed for the Committee 
on Public Buildings to make repairs on the sta- 
tion houses during the present municipal year. 

The order went over. 

PAYING REPORTS. 

Alderman Robinson submitted the following 
from the Committee on Paving: 

Report of leave to withdraw on petition of 
Frederick Wilson for leave to move a wooden 
building from Dunreath place, through Warren 
street to Maywood street. Accepted. 

Report and order of notice for hearing on Mon- 
day, Feb. 26, at four o'clock P. M., on petition of 
Middlesex Railroad Company, for extension of 
Lincoln-street track. Order passed. 

Sundry schedules of cost of laying edgestones 
and sidewalks, with orders for the assessment and 
collection of the same. Orders severally read 
twice and passed. 

UNION FREIGHT RAILROAD. 

Alderman Thompson offered the following : 

Ordered, That between the hours of 7 A. M. and 
7 P. M. no train consisting of more than three cars 
with s, locomotive shall be allowed to pass over 
the tracks of the Union Freight Railroad, located 
in the public streets of this city. 

Ordered, That the Chief of Police be directed to 
see that the foregoing order is strictly observed 
by the Union Freight Railroad Company. 

Alderman Thompson — Perhaps I ought to ex- 
plain the object of that order. It has become an 
intolerable nuisance to people travelling at the 
North End of the city to be obstructed by the 
freight trains of the Union Freight Railroad ex- 
tending from the gashouse around tiie corner of 
the streets. I have been obstructed there several 
times myself. Last week, at eleven o'clock in the 
morning, there was a line of cars on both sides of 
the street, owing to this corporation occupying all 
the street on both sides of the thoroughfare. 
It seems to me we might as well have this matter 
stopped. When requested by citizens to break 
the trains tne company refuses to do so. It seems 
to me that if an order of this kind were adopted 
by the Board, so that they might move a train of 
three cars, it might be done and be no inconven- 
ience to the company. But the obstruction of this 
thoroughfare ought to be stopped. It has become 
an intolerable nuisance. 

Alderman Clark— It seems to me if you are not 
going to allow them but three loaded freight cars 
to one engine you might as well take away their 
charter altogether. I do not understand the ques- 
tion sufficiently to discuss it tonight, but that is 
the way it strikes me now. It seems to me that 
here is a road that is trying to do a business to 
help the business of the city, and if you are going 
to compel them to take only three cars for one en- 
gine, that the whole business of the road must be 
abandoned. That is the way it strikes me now. 
I hope the order will not be passed tonight. I 



move that it be laid upon the table for one week. 
Alderman Thompson— I do not object to the or- 
der lying over for one week. Until recently the 
Union Freight Railway have not been at liberty to 
run engines through the streets of the city in the 
day time, and they only had the privilege of run- 
ning them in the night time. The Alderman 
speaks of the road as for the interest of the city 
of Boston. It is rathei; an injury to the citizens 
of Boston, because it takes away from the poor 
people the carrying of merchandise to and from the 
depots. So you cannot make that argument. But, 
sir, I think that if any member of this Board could 
be in that vicinity and see a train of a dozen cars 
extending over those avenues and see the travel- 
ling on the highways obstructed for some fifteen 
or twenty minutes at a time, he would think it is 
time the thing was stopped. I called the atten- 
tion of the Chief of Police to this matter, and he 
desires the Board to give him some instructions in 
regard to It. This matter was before the Board 
last year, and was referred to the Committeee on 
Paving, and by them referred back to the full 
Board. I only desire the cars to move so that they 
will not obstruct the streets. It seems to me that 
three cars at a time are enough. 

Alderman O'Brien — I think that the order is an 
appropriate subject for the consideration of some 
committee. It appears to me it ought to go to the 
Committee on Paving, to give the parties a hearing 
and to obtain all the facts in relation to the mat- 
ter. I move that it be referred to the Committee 
on Paving. 

Alderman Clark — I withdraw the motion to 
lay on the table ; it should go either to the Com- 
mittee on Paving or the Committee on Police. 

Alderman O'Brien— I have no objection to either 
committee. I suppose that either committee is 
proper. 

Alderman Thompson^It was referred to the 
Committee on Paving last year, and they took 
legal advice in the matter, and reported back to 
the Board that they had no authority in the mat- 
ter. It seems to me that the whole Board can con- 
sider the subject as well as any committee. 

Alderman Fitzgerald— I hope that if we are go- 
ing to have a hearing on this matter the 
time of this Board will not be occupied with it. 
If we are going to have a hearing I hope it will be 
before some committee. I do not care whether it 
be the Committee on Police or Paving. 

The order was referred to the Committee on 
Paving. 

DECORATION OF HISTORIC POINTS. 

Alderman Thompson offered an order— That a 
joint special committee, consisting of two mem- 
bers of this Board, with such as the Common 
Council may join, be appointed to have charge of 
the erection of the monuments on Dorchester 
Heights and on the site of the Roxbury fort. 
Read twice, and Aldermen Thompson and Breck 
were appointed on said committee. Sent down. 

NOMINATION OF ASSESSORS. 

Alderman Wilder submitted a report from the 
Joint Committee on Assessors' Department rec- 
ommending the election of Thomas Hills, Benja- 
min Cushing, Benjamin F. Palmer, Edward F. 
Robinson and Joshua S. Duncklee as Assessors. 
Accepted. Sent down. Election laid over. 

LICENSES. 

Alderman Fitzgerald submitted reports from 
the Committee on Licenses, as follows: 

Minors' Applications Granted — Twenty-four 
newsboys. 

Auctioneer's License Refused— John K. Ab- 
bott, 59 Cambridge street. 

Common Victuallers Licensed — Philip Lanouett, 
28 and 30 Merrimac street ; Henry Beard, 103 Eliot 
street. 

Innholder's License Refused— Maggie P. Rug- 
gles, 44 Cambridge street. 

Hack License Granted— H. & J. Graham, 615 
Washington street, after six o'clock P. M. 

Dealer in Second Hand Articles Licensed— Ed- 
ward Booker, 154 Merrimac street. 

Junk Collector Licensed— William Maloney, 1232 
Tremont street. 

Wagon Licenses Granted — E. H. Perkins, corner 
Tyler and Kneeland streets; Francis Brady, 154 
Tudor street; Thomas Dacey, 119 Haverhill 
street. 

Severally accepted. 

SPECIAL COMMITTEES ANNOUNCED. 

TheMayorannounced the following joint special 
committees on the part of the Board : 



47 



BOARnJ OF ALDERMEN 



On Public Parks— Aldermen O'Brien and Clark. 
On Improved Sewerage — Aldermen Burnliam, 
"Wilder and Slade. 

CONDITION OF THE FRANKLIN FUND. 

Alderman Burnliam submitted the following : 
The committee appointed to examine the ac- 
counts of S. F. McCleary, Treasurer of the Frank- 
lin Fund, have attended to that duty and report 
that they find said accounts have been correctly 
kept, the interest duly collected and the securities 
which were examined by the committee were 
found in iiroper condition. It appears from this 
examination that the condition of the fund at this 
date is as follows : 

Amount of fund Feb. 1, 1876 §206,501.33 

Interest accrued and collected 12,299.25 

g218,800.58 

The above sum is invested as follows : 
Deposits In Massachusetts Hospital Life 

Office 216,878.14 

Deposits in Suffolk Savings Bank 251.10 

" " Provident Institution for Sav- 
ings 171.07 

Value of seven bonds for loans 1 ,500.00 

Cash 27 

»218,800.58 
Respectfully submitted, 

CHOATE BuRNHAM. I rommittPP 

Charles W. Wilder. ] committee. 
Accepted. 

PAYMENT OF EXECU'flONS OR JUDGMENTS'. 

Alderman O'Brien offered an order— That his 
Honor the Mayor be authorized, with the approval 
of the Committee on Claims, to draw upon the 
Treasurer for the payment of all executions or 
judgments of court against the city when proper- 
ly certified as correct by the City Solicitor. Read 
twice and passed. Sent down. 

PERMIT FOR STABLE. 

Alderman Viles submitted a report from the 
V ommittee on Health on the part of the Board in 



favor of granting a permit.to Aaron D. Williams 
to occupy new wooden stable on Hampden street. 
Accepted. 

BILLS ALLOWED. 

Alderman Clark, from the Committee on Ac- 
counts, offered an order— That the following bills 
be allowed for payment by the Auditor of 
Accounts : 

Of I. E. Noyes, chargeable to House of Industry, 
$158; George Curtis, chargeable to Paving Depart- 
ment, $48.06; George Curtis, chargeable to Sewers, 
$16.86; George Curtis, chargeable to Health 
Department, i|;i3.57; George Curtis, chargeable to 
Northampton-street District. $8.77; F. W. Lincoln, 
Jr., & Co., chargeable to school expenses, $36; F. 
W. Lincoln, Jr., & Co., chargeable to public build- 
ings, $18; James Power & Co., chargeable to pub- 
lic baths, $5.66. 

Read twice and passed. Sent down. 

LAND DAMAGES. 

Alderman Clark, from the Committee on Streets 
on the part of the Board, offered an order to pay 
Edwin R. Jenness $1124 for land taken and dam- 
ages occasioned by the widening of Shawmut 
avenue. Read twice and passed. 

PARK ON HACK BAY. 

Alderman Clark offered an order— That the Com- 
mittee on Common and Public Grounds be author- 
ized to confer, in behalf of the City Council, with 
the Governor and Council of this Commonwealth 
for the conveyance to the city of the parcel of land 
on Dartmouth and Boylston streets, referred to 
and described in chapter 195 of the Acts of 1875. 
Passed. Sent down. 

IMPROVED SEWERAGE. 

On motion of Alderman Clark the order for the 
appointment of a Joint Special Committee on Im- 
proved Sewerage, to resume the work of last year, 
was taken from the table, and amended so as to 
authorize said committee to take charge of said 
work, etc., and as amended was passed. Sent 
down. 

Adjourned, on motion of Alderman Thompson. 



COMMON COUNCIL 



48 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

FEBRUARY 1, 1877. 



llegular meeting at 7.30 o'clock P. M., Benjamin 
Pope, President, in the chair. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMBN. 

Various petitions were referred in concurrence. 

A petition from James Deshon to be refunded 
money paid for a tax title alleged to be invalid, 
came down referred to the Joint Committee on 
Claims. 

Mr. Clarke of Ward 22—1 move that the petition 
be referred to the Committee on Assessors' De- 
partment, to which it seems to me it ought to be 
referred. 

Mr. Mowry of Ward 11— It seems to me that the 
proper reference is to the Committee on Claims. 
It is a claim for a certain specific amount of 
money, and no committee but the Committee on 
Claims has iurisdiction over it. 

Mr. Clarke of Ward 22—1 believe that claims for 
excessive taxation or for taxes wrongfully assess- 
ed lie entirely with the Committee on Assessors' 
Department. They have the power to abate or 
cancel the bill, and then the Treasurer pays the 
money back again. This is a claim that the City 
Collector can settle himself, provided the Assess- 
ors are satisfied that it has been wrongfully as- 
sessed. 

At the request of Mr. Clarke, the President read 
the petition, representing that the estate was pur- 
chased in October, 1876, by the payment of $135.37, 
as belonging to George S. Winslow, and the title 
is invalid because it should have been sold as be- 
longing to Henry Morrison, who had bought it 
from the city. 

Mr. Thompson of Ward 9— This matter of the 
right of the Treasurer to refund money paid for 
tax titles has been referred to the City Solicitor, 
and he is of opinion that the Treasurer cannot 
properly act upon the report of the Assessors 
alone ; and I untterstand that until some general 
rule is provided for these cases, the Treasurer de- 
sires to be protected by having these cases passed 
upon in the same manner as other claims against 
the city. I hojie the motion will not prevau, and 
that the petition will be referred to the Committee 
on Claims. 

The motion to refer to the Committee on Asses- 
sors' Department was lost, and the petition was 
referred to the Committee on Claims in concur- 
rence. 

Order for a, conference with the Governor and 

Council for conveyance to the city of parcel of 

land on Dartmouth and Bovlston streets, referred 

"to and described in chapter 195, Acts of 1875. 

Read twice and passed in concurrence. 

Order for a joint special committee to have 
charge of the erection of the monuments on Dor- 
chester Heights, and on site of Roxbury Fort. 
Read twice and passed in concurrence, and Messrs. 
Ham of Ward 14, Blanchard of Ward 21, and Fra- 
ser of Ward 6 were joined on said committee. 

Order for sale by auction of land and buildings 
of Cooper-street Armory. Read twice and passed 
in concurrence. 

Order for Mayor to draw on Treasurer for pay- 
ment of executions or judgments of court against 
the city. Read twice and passed in concurrence. 

Order to pay bills of J. E. Noyes et al. against 
the city. Ordered to a second reading. 

Order for the Committee on Improved Sewerage 
to have charge of all matters relating to the sub- 
ject, and to employ assistance as therein set forth. 
Ordered to a second reading. 

Report nominating as AssessMrs Thomas Hills, 
Benjamin Cu-shing, Benjamin F. Palmer, Edward 
F. Robinson and Joshua S. Duncklee. Accepted 
in concurrence. 

Certificate of the appointment of the members 
of the Common Council as special officers. Placed 
on file. 

U>JFI>ISHEO BUSINESS. 

Order to supply furniture for, and make repairs 
on, schoolhouses. Passed in concurrence. 

Order to provide furniture for, and make re- 
pairs on, the City Hall, engine houses and police 
stations. Passed in concurrence. 

Order to rescind order of Sept. 30, 1867, for a 
loan of .$150,000 for Oliver-street improvement, 
and for a transfer from unexpended appropria- 



tions of this financial year of the sum, less reve- 
nue received, advanced by Treasurer under said 
loan, to meet Auditor's drafts drawn in payment 
for said Oliver-street improvement. Passed — ' 
yeas 60, nays 0. Sent up. 

Order for flags to be displayed and bells to be 
rung on 22d of February, Washington's Birthday. 

Mr. McGaiagle of Ward 8— Is there any limit as 
to the amount to be expended in displaying the 
flags and ringing the bells ? 

The President — There is none named in the or- 
der. 

Mr. Mowry of Ward 11— The question might also 
be raised whether there is any limit as to tne time 
in the day. 

The order was passed— yeas 60, nays 0. Sent up. 

UNIFORM SYSTEM OF VALUATION. 

The order for Mayor to appoint a commission to 
consider a plan for a more uniform and equitable 
valuation of pioperty for taxation ; expense of 
the commission not to exceed f .300 was considered 
under unfinished business. 

Mr. Clarke of Ward 22—1 should like to hear 
some reason why that order should be passed. 

Mr. Wilbur of Ward 20— I had the honor of of- 
fering that order, and my object was this: Un- 
der the present system of assessing property there 
seems to be a great discrepancy in the equaliza- 
tion of valuation. This order is but a step in that 
direction. It seemed to me that ;here mighit <be 
some plan devised, if the proper persons were ap- 
pointed, than what we have at the present time. 
I do not know that there is anything I can 
say further than that I hope the commissioners 
will be appointed and that we shall have 
some plan reported for our consideration. We are 
not obliged to adopt it if it does not meet our 
views. The investigation will do no harm. The 
commissioners will serve without compensation, 
and the expense will be merely nominal — $300 be- 
ing allowed in the order, and perhaps they may 
not use the whole of it. At any rate if the plan 
commends itself to us, three times that amount 
will be a. small sum. 

Mr. Mowry of Ward 11- 1 fully concur with the 
object this order has in view. I certainly think 
the system of the valuation of real estate in this 
city is dilficult to understand, but the only ques- 
tion is as to the means of bringing about the re- 
duction. Now, sir, we have a competent Board of 
Assessors, by whom some plan should be devised 
and reported to this Council upon which action 
might be taken. I have serious doubts in my own 
mind whether a pdan reported by a commis- 
sion appointed for such a purpose might be adopt- 
ed. They might report a certain plan, but I do 
not see how we are going to adopt it. The subject 
is left wholly in the nands of the Board of Assess- 
ors, and it seems to me that the proper way is to 
request them to devise certain means by whicb 
this reduction may be brought about. 

The order was passed. Sent up. 

VXIFOllM FOR FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8— At the last meeting 
of the Council I offered an order that the Commit- 
tee on Fire Department report an order to pre- 
scribe a uniform for Fire Commissioners, and for 
an order for them to conform to "General Order 
No. 60," relating to wearing of uniforms. My 
reason for doing that was, I accidentally 
got hold of a copy of General Order No. 60, 
recently issued by the Fire Commissioners, 
and after carefully reading it I came to the 
conclusion that their intention was that the 
department should be run in regular-army 
style. I concluded that the order, as a means of 
discipline, was a good one, although foolish in 
some of its details, and therefore 1 offered this 
order. But I am sorry to say that some members 
of the Council thought it was done in jest and the 
order was refusea a second reading; and 
therefore I move a reconsideration of that vote. 
Now, while I agree that discipline should be main- 
tained in the department, 1 think it is nothing 
more than fair that the superior officers should 
wear some uniform by which they shall be 
known. As an illustration of the necessi- 
ty for it, one of the commissioners, who 
has not been in the office a great while, 
went to an engine house in South Boston, 
and a^ied the first man he met, "Are you foreman 
of this company?" And receiving the reply that 
he was, the commissioner said, "Don't you know 
that I am a commissioner ? Why don't you salute 
me?" Now, I think that was hard for that man. 
The commissioners should wear a uniform by 
which they may be known. Now, in regard 



4r9 



COMMON COUNCIL 



to the general order. It provides that the 
men may not wear their pants turned up 
or tucked into their boots except in going to or 
coming tromafire; and on the streets the coat 
must be buttoned up to their neck, ■vrbifih is not 
very agreeable with the thermometer up to 90°. 
It may be very good for the commissioners, but it 
is death to the men. It is with that view that I 
move the reconsideration, and I hope it will pre- 
vail. 

Mr. Burke of Ward 2— It seems to me that this 
is a fit subject for the Joint Committee on the 
Fire Department to consider in consultation with 
the members of the JFire Commission. 

Mr. McGaragle — I intend to move its reference 
to the Committee on Fire Department. 

The reconsideration prevailed and Mr. McGara- 
gle moved the reference of the order to the Joint 
Committee on Fire Department. 

Mr. Howes of Ward 18—1 do not see that we are 
going to gain anything by sending this order to 
the Committee on Fire Department. If the gen- 
tleman is desirous of having the rule of the de- 
partment in relation to wearing uniforms changed 
it might be as well to intimate it by some order to 
that effect, but I do not see how it will be done by 
this. He says it is an evil to the men to follow the 
rules laid down by the commissioners, and he 
wishes to lessen it ; but the difficulty is the order 
amounts to nothing. It is evidently intended to 
get up a quarrel between the Fire Commissioners 
and the two branches of the City Government. 

Mr. Clarke of Ward 22—1 see no harm in refer- 
ring this order to the Committee on Fire Depart- 
ment. It may be that the Fire Commissioners 
would prefer to have .=ome badge or uniform. It 
is well known that it is impossible for the Fire 
Commissioners to do anything without having 
fault found in some manner or other. If they 
should adopt a uniform, then some member would 
say that they are putting on airs. If the order is 
referred to the Committee on Fire Department 
aad they should decide, after consulting with the 
Fire Commissioners, that it was proper for 
them, as the head of the department, 
to wear some uniform, as the Chief 
of Police does, perhaps the commissioners 
would prefer to have it done. I see no objection 
to that part of the order being referred, but there 
is one part of it that I do object to. There is no 
evidence here that the Fire Commissioners have 
disobeyed Order No. 60, or that they don't wear 
their pants in the proper manner. If any gentle- 
man states that he has seen the Fire Commission- 
ers wearing their pants in their boots, it is 
another matter. I have seen them on the 
streets and I think they comply with all the or- 
ders they adopt. I do not think they should be re- 
quested to comply with an order until we know 
that they have broken it. It is well known that 
some members of the department appear upon the 
streets breaking the rules. It is the custom of the 
Committee on Police to see that the men in that 
department make a respectable appearance, and I 
think the Fire Commissioners should do the same 
thing. It is well known that soldiers have to keep 
their clothes in good condition on street and pa- 
rade duty. I object to the latter part of the order 
and I move to strike out all after the word "de- 
partment." 

Mr. McGaragle— I don't care how the commis- 
sioners wear their pants, or whether they wear 
none. I have no desire to prescribe regulations 
in regard to that. As to getting up trouble be- 
tween the commissioners and the City Govern- 
ment, I have no desire to do that, and tbe gentle- 
man [Mr. Hovves] mistakes my object. But I 
think the members of the Fire Department 
should have equal privileges with the great- 
est criminals in the State prison, where 
they are allowed to see their friends. But 
if you want to see a fireman you must first go to 
the man in charge, and then consult with the fore- 
man. That is the object of Order 60. I think fire- 
men should have the same privileges as are given 
to convicts. 

Mr. Burke of Ward 2—1 hope the motion to refer 
will prevail. Although a member of the commit- 
tee, there are a good many questions relating to 
the department that I am not familiar with, and 
the reference will give the committee a chance to 
consider them. 

Mr. Howes — Having served a year on the Com- 
mittee on Fire Department, I feel a little more 
confidence in speaking of that department than 
of some others. It is pretty well known that be- 
fore Order No. 60 was issued the engine houses 
were made quite a loafing place, very much as 



City Hall has been for some time past. It is diffi- 
cult to draw the line. You have got to lay down a 
very strict rule, and then leave it to the discretion 
of some one to draw the line. I think the firemen 
have not complained. Certainly there have been 
no resignations on account of the order, 
and there are more applications for admis- 
sion than could be granted were tbe de- 
partment three times as large. Now, I don't think 
the point made by the gentleman LMr. McGaragle] 
is well taken. The commissioners are not at 
the head of the department : the Chief Engineer 
is the head. The commissioners give directions 
to the department. The secretary of war in 
Washington is not in uniform ; he sits in his office 
and directs the affairs of the army and manages 
details, while the general wears a uniform and 
goes out and fights battles. In this case the Chief 
Engineer goes out and puts out fires. It would be 
manifestly absurd to put one man in uniform 
whose duties confined him almost entirely to the 
office. I do not see any necessity for it ;' and as 
the ordinance provides that this matter shall be 
left in the hands of the commissioners, I don't see 
the necessity of passing the order. 

Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19— The gentleman 
draws more conclusions from facts that he knows 
perhaps more about, than any man I ever saw. 
The ordinance reads— 

"The duty of extinguishing fires and protecting 
life and property in case of fire shall, within the 
city of Boston, be intrusted to the said Board of 
Commissioners." 

I should like to know how the commissioners 
are going to put out fires by staying in the office. 
I think the idea advanced by the gentleman 
is like that entertained by many— that they 
are to stay in the office. I hope this 
matter will "be referred to the Committee on 
Fire Department, and that they will investi- 
gate it. It seems to me that the best way for the 
commissioners to learn whether it is best to walk 
the streets of Boston on a hot day, with the coat 
buttoned up, is for them to try it. I should like 
to see them try it. It seems to me that is the most 
obnoxious order ever promulgated by the commis- 
sioners. I don't know but some of us had better 
go up and make the speech to the firemen that 
the old Roman senator did — I am not well quali- 
fied to quote Shakspeare — 

"Had yourather Csesar were living and die all 
slaves, or rather Caisar were dead and die all 
freemen ?" 

Ishould begin with the firemen something like 
that. This order is simply ridiculous to me. If 
the police have found a man with his boots not 
polished, from stepping into a mud-puddle, and 
he has been reported to the Fire Commissioners, 
why don't the Fire Commissioners call that man 
in and talk to him ? Why do they send out an 
order reflecting upon all the firemen? I don't 
think it is necessary or called for. I think the 
Fire Commissioners have done a good many' 
good things. Perhaps they fill the position 
well and save the city a great many dol- 
lars, but I have n't seen it as much 
as many others do. I think this subject 
ought to be investigated. If our firemen are 
merely slaves and tools, put in position to start at 
the ringing of a bell, and to do this and that and 
the other, it seems to me it is time for this City 
Council to take hold of the matter, and that it is a 
matter for us to investigate. I tell you they are 
citizens as well as we are, and have their rights as 
well as we have. I should like to have any man 
tell me how I shall wear my coat buttoned up ! 
Have n't they any feeling ? Ain't they men, as we 
are ? , I don't believe any of them can whistle 
"Yankee Doodle" with the coat buttoned up. 
With the permission of the Council, I would like 
to read the order : 
"General Orders, No. 60. 

"Notice is hereby given to the permanent mem- 
bers of the department, that strict attention must 
be given to the proper wearing of their uniforms. 
It is required that on the street (except in going 
to or from a fire) the coat will be buttoned en- 
tire"— 

Back and all, I suppose. 

"—The legs of their pants are not to be turned 
up or tucked into their boots; their boots, buttons 
and 'devices' are to be properly poUshed, and their 
persons at all times neatly and tidily dressed. 
Their deportment must always be of a gentle- 
manly character, and such only as will reflect 
credit on the department." 

I don't know what they mean by that. 

"Lounging along, or loitering with no apparent 



FEBRUAK Y 



1877 



50 



object in view, is to be avoided; an earnest, ener- 
getic attention to their duties is demanded." 

They ought to take lessons from some of our 
walkists. 

"The house and street patrol will wear the de- 
partment badge on the centre of the left breast of 
the coat, in full view, as a distinguishing mark of 
their detail." 

"The same habits of dress and deportment will 
be observed in the engine, ladder and hose houses, 
except in the sitting and work rooms; and, after 
roll call, no part of the uniform will be laid aside 
until bedtime, or by consent of the officer in com- 
mand." 

That is pretty hard. 

"The members will not be allowed on the main 
floor, except in the performance of duties assign- 
ed them by the officer in charge, and smoking on 
the main floor, and in the dormitory, as well as on 
the street, and in the stable and stable loft, is pro- 
hibited; and it is made the duty of the 'Patrol' to 
inform the officer in command of all violations of 
these rules that may come under his observation 
while on duty ; all visitors having a desire to view 
the house and apparatus, or wishing to see any of 
the members on business or otherwise, are to be 
received courteously, and the officer in charge 
notified of the same, and it is expected that 
their stay will be only so long as will be reasona- 
ble." 

They will have an order out about that, pretty 
soon. 

"Idling about the house will not be permitted, 
as the houses are for business, and not for loung- 
ing; all necessary work in and about the house, 
stable and apparatus is to be done before 'Roll 
Call,' except in case of a I ecent alarm of fire, or 
some unforeseen emergency intervenes to prevent 
it, and in either case the work is to be done as 
rapidly as possible thereafter. 

"OflEicers and members, while on leave of ab- 
sence, will be held accountable for their con- 
duct" - 

It would n't do for them to go do tvn the harbor. 

— "whether in uniform or not, and if in uni- 
form, strictly so." 

X would like to know when our firemen get a day 
of leisure in the year? 

"It is made the duty of all officers to take cogni- 
zance of these and all other rules, regulations and 
orders. 

By order of the Board,. 

David Chambeblin, Chairman." 

That is the order, gentlemen . 

Mr. Howes— "What is the date ? 

Mr. Spenceley— "Boston, Jan. 4, 1877." The 
Chief Engineer's name is n't given there, and I 
hope it never will be. Now, I understand that all 
the gentleman asks is that the Fire Commissioners 
have a like uniform, and obey the same order that 
the firemen do; and I hope it will be put in that 
after they go home and eat their suppers that they 
will sit with their coats on till they go to bed. 

Mr. Howes— I would like to know of the chair- 
man of the Committee on Fire Department, if he 
wishes anything to be done, why that order should 
have been introduced by some one not on the 
committee to give him the necessary force to look 
into it? 

Mr. Spenceley— The gentleman himself [Mr. Mc- 
Garagle] explained that; but I will say that I 
have had the matter of the Fire Department go- 
ing along, and intented to bring the whole thing 
in at once. I have had this thing in hand some 
time, and asked one of the Fire Commissioners 
how he would like to go along the streets with his 
coat buttoned up on a hot day, and he said he did 
n't know; and I don't believe he did. 

Mr. Thompson of Ward 9—1 suppose that there 
are proper ways of arriving at certain things, and 
very improper ones. If the gentleman wishes to 
correct abuses in the Fire Department, he 
can do so by a proper order, and I should 
be glad of an investigation if it is de- 
sired; but I have doubts whether this or- 
der is a proper one. Look at the power un- 
der which this board is constituted. I see by the 
statute that certain powers and authority are 
granted to the City Council, and then the second 
section provides — 

"The powers and duties mentioned , in the pre- 
ceding section, or any of them, may be exercised 
and carried into effect by the said City Council in 
any manner which they may prescribe, and 
through the agency of any persons or any board 
or boards, to whom they may delegate the same." 

I apprehend that under that provision we have 
organized the Fire Commissioners. They are the 



civil officers of the city, and exercise the powers 
originally vested in the City Council. The 
question is simply this: Have we the 
right to order those commissioners to wear 
uniforms? I apprehend that we have not the right 
to coerce them into wearing uniforms. It is tiue 
we have attempted to exercise the right to make 
some of the Common Councilmen policemen 
against their will; b\it I apprehend that we have 
no more control over the commissioners in that 
particular than we have over the Councilmen. 
Now, if the gentleman wishes to investigate what 
are alleged to be abuses in the Fire Department, let 
him introduce an order for that purpose ; but I do 
think this order is not a proper one, and I hope it 
will be voted down. 

Mr. Beeching of Ward 1 — I think this order may 
be improved somewhat by an amendment. I 
move to add after the word "requested" the 
words "if they deem it expedient." 

The President— An amendment is not in order 
while the motion to refer is pending. 

The order was referred to the Joint Committee 
on Fire Department. Sent up. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED. 

By Mr. Webster of Ward 3— Petitions of W. J. De- 
bus and other citizens of Charlestown employed 
by the Paving Department, remonstrating against 
a reduction made in their pay, on Jan. 31st ult., 
without any notification from them. While some 
men received $1.75 a day, they received only $1.25 
for the same work. 

Mr. Webster of Ward 3 — I move the reference 
of the petition to the Committee on Paving on the 
part of the Council. I would also add that I be- 
lieve these laborers have a serious complaint. I 
trust it will receive the careful attention of the 
committee, and that justice will be done them, if 
justice is needed. 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8— Has this committee 
any power in the matter ? And does it not have 
to go to the Board of Aldermen ? 

The President — The Paving Committee on the 
part or the Council have no power. 

Mr. Webster withdrew the motion, and on mo- 
tion of Mr. McGaragle, the petition was sent up. 

By Mr. Rulfin of Ward 9— Petitions of James C. 
Tucker to be refunded the amount paid to two de- 
fective tax titles; and of Uriah J. Dailey to be 
comijensated for injuries to his horse on Harvard 
street, Charlestown. Severally referred to Joint 
Committee on Claims. Sent up. 

By Mr. Coe of Ward 23— Petitions of Joseph 
Steadman et al., for the establishment of a branch 
of the Public Library in West Koxbury, at Curtis 
Hall. Referred to Joint Committee on Public Li- 
brary. Sent up. 

, ANNUAL EEPOKT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 

The annual report of the City Engineer (City 
Doc. 15) was received. Sent up. 

Following were the expenses from Jan. 1, 1876, 
to Jan. 1, 1877: Amount expended from depart- 
ment appropriation for 1875-76, $7966.15; amount 
expended from department appropriation for 
1876-77, $18,371.92; total expended from depart- 
ment appropriation, $26,338.07; amount expended 
from special and other appropriations, $5017.82 ; 
total, $31,955.89. Amount of appropriation for 
financial year 1876-77, $28,000; amount expended 
to Jan. 1, 1877, $18,371.92; unexpended balance, 
Jan. 1, 1877, $9628.08. 

In the Department of Bridges, the principal 
work done has been the various examinations and 
repairs necessary to the maintenance of the 
bridges in charge of the Committee on Bridges, 
viz. : Twenty-one bridges with openings for the 
passage of vessels, and Winthrop Briage; the 
completion of Meridian-street Bridge, superin- 
tending the rebuilding of Dover-street Bridge, the 
work of filling solid a portion of Chelsea Bridge, 
and the examination of all highway bridges with- 
in the city limits. The preparation of the various 
plans and papers connected with the foregoing- 
work, such as reports, estimates, contracts, speci- 
fications, estimates for payment, and the exam- 
ination of bills tor labor and materials for repairs, 
involves a large amount of office work. Two im- 
portant changes ha"e been made in the manner of 
making the bridge repairs during thejyear. 

The first is the buying by contract of all the 
spruce plank required, and the second is the hir- 
ing a foreman and carpenters by the city directly, 
instead of paying a profit to a contractor for fur- 
nishing labor. Mr. Josiah Shaw, a bridge-build- 
ing foreman of long experience, was the one em- 
ployed to superintend the repairs. The spruce 



51 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



lumber is the largest item of material required, 
and about 277,000 feet B. M. have been used 
during the year. The price paid has been $12.90 
for 70,000 feet for Chelsea Bridge, and §14.85 for 
about 207,000 feet furnished in s\ich quantities and 
at such bridges as were required. An act of the 
Legislature was obtained at its last session allow- 
ing cities and towns to enact rules or by-laws reg- 
ulating the passage of vessels through draw- 
bridges, and a draft of a set of rules has been pre- 
pared, but has not been passed by the City Govern- 
ment. 

In regard to the water works, the report states 
that water from Sudbury River has been turned 
into the lake during the past year, from Jan. 12 to 
18, from Jan. 21 to Feb. 19, from March 27 to 30, 
from May 4 to 10, from July 24 to Sept. 2, from 
Sept. 9 to 16, from Sept. 28 to Nov. 11, Nov. 16, and 
from Dec. 9 to 28, or 161 days in all. The total 
quantity of water diverted from the river was 
2,528,.300,000 gallons, equal to a daily supply of 
6,907,900 srallons for the whole year. In the latter 
part of 1875 the lake surface was slowlj; falling, 
and it continued to fall till Jan. l.S, when it reach- 
ed a point eight feet nine inches above the bottom 
of the conduit; at this date it began to rise, and 
reached high-water mark March 26. On the 21st 
of March a warm rain falling upon a considerable 
depth of snow produced a heavy freshet, which 
was further increased on the 25th by a snow 
storm which turned into rain. On the 27th Sud- 
bury River had risen to an unprecedented height, 
and was flowing at the rate of 2,000,000,000 gallons 
in twenty-tour hours ; the lake was also brought 
to a high point, and a heavy Avaste was occasioned 
at the dam, the depth of the overflow being twen- 
ty-one inches. 

From March 29 until the latter part of May the 
lake surface stood at or near high-water mark. It 
then began to fall, and on the 26th of July had 
fallen to 9 feet 4 inches above the conduit bottom. 
Water from the river was now turned into the 
lake at the rate of 20,000,000 gallons per aay, and 
the surface rose until August 7, when it stood at 
10 feet. It kept at this height for two weeks, and 
then began to fall, standing Sept. 1, 9 feet 7 inch- 
es; Oct. 1, 8 feet 8 inches, and Oct. 21, 8 feet 3 
inches above the bottom of the conduit, the last 
being the least height for the year. Nov. 1 it had 
risen to 8 feet 41/4 inches, Dec. 1, 9 feet 9% inches, 
and at this date, Jan. 1, 1877, it stands at 9 feet. 
There has lieen waste over the dam from March 
25 to April 12, from April 19 to 23, and from May 
10 to 14, the total waste being 1,619,243,800 gallons, 
equal to a daily supply of 4,424,200 gallons for the 
whole year. 

The average daily consumption from the Cochit- 
uate works tor each month of the year was as fol- 
lows: January, 21,550,200 gallons ; February, 22,- 
675,200; March, 20,931,500; April, 17,300,500; May, 
18,837,800; June, 19,872,300; July, 20,820,600; August, 
21,333,900; September, 19,430^00; October, 19,214,- 
000; November, 17,023,700; December, 23,78.3,000— 
making- the average daily consumption for the 
year 20,337,700 gallons, an increase of five per cent, 
over the consumption of 1875. 

In regard to the high-service Boston Highlands 
pumping work, the report says the ijumps and 
engines at this station have worked very satisfac- 
torily, and are now in good condition. The aver- 
age daily quantities of water pumped in each 
month have been as follows: January, 1,402,859 
gallons; February, 1,517,922; March, 1,403,026; 
April, 1,304,626; May, 1,346,335; June, 1,463,267; 
July, 1,457,000; August, 1,446,387; September, 1 ,446,- 
660; October, 1,491,871; November, 1,452,143; De- 
cember, 1,798,887. The average daily quantity for 
the year being 1,461,104 gallons, an increase of 
15.06 per cent, over the quantity pumped in 1875. 
The consumption from these works during the 
last two weeks of the year has been at the rate of 
1,874,148 gallons per day, a quantity just about 
equal to their present capaoity. 

Regarding additional water supply, the report 
says that by an order of the City Council, approved 
July 18, 1876, the city treasurer was authorized to 
borrow the sum of $2,000,000 to be added to the ap- 
propriations heretofore made for an additional 
supply of water. This, added to the sums before 
appropriated for preliminary investigations (Oct. 
20. 1871, $10,000), for connecting Sudbury River 



with Lake Cochituate as a means of temporary 
supply (April 12, 1872, $100,000), and for building 
the Sudbury River works (April 11, 1873, .$500,000, 
Feb. 26, 1875, $1,500,000) makes the total amount 
appropriated $4,110,000. The premium on the sale 
of bonds ($352,886.80) stands to the credit of this 
appropriation ; therefore the total sum with which 
the additional supply is charged is $4,462,886.80. 

The amount expended to date, including the es- 
timates and bills audited in December, is .'$2,9.33,- 
842.93, of which sum $2,325,186.21 is chargeable to 
labor and materials used in the construction of 
the permanent works, that is, has been paid on 
account of contracts, for work done by da3' labor, 
and for materials. The retained percentage to 
secure the faithful execution of the contracts is 
$196,653.31. 

During the past year the work on the conduit 
has been prosecuted vigorously, many of the sec- 
tions having been completed, and on a number of 
the contracts the final payments have been made. 
About nine-tenths of the length of the conduit is 
finished. The part of the work remaining to be 
done is largely upon special structures, such as the 
bridge and siphons. Work, by day labor, on sec- 
tion 1 and on the foundations of the dams was 
commenced in the latter part of May and contin- 
ued without interruption to the end of the season. 
Section 1 is practically finished, and the masonry 
of the gate chambers at its head is so far 
advanced that it will be finished early 
next summer. The work upon the dams 
is not so far advanced as could be wished, 
although it has been well pushed since 
it began. The foundation for dam 1 is finished, 
and a contract for the superstructure will be let 
this winter. The foundations for dams 2 and 3 
are each about half completed. The contract for 
the superstructures, it is expected, will be let 
during the coming spring or in early summer. 
The work required to connect the conduit with 
Che.stnut-Hill Reservoir is not yet begun. Coal- 
tracts for the chambers and for the pipes will be 
made soon. 

The average number of men employed on the 
work done by day labor was 270 ; the largest num- 
ber, 432. The largest number of men employed at 
any one time by the various contractors' and di 
rectly by the city was 2300. 

COST OF REMOVING UIGHT SOIL. 

Mr. Blanchard of Ward 21 ofiEered an order- 
That the Committee on Health be requested to 
consider the expediency of causing a reduction in 
the price charged by the contractors for the re- 
moval of night soil, or to take such measures to 
relieve citizens from the present high charges 
that they may deem necessary. Read twice and 
passed. Sent up. 

XOMIXATIONS OF CITV OFFICERS. 

Reports from joint special nominating commit- 
tees wei-e submitted as follows : 

By Mr. Crocker of Ward 9— For City Solicitor, 
.John P. Healy. 

By Mr. Blodgett of Ward 8— For Superintendent 
of Sewers, William H. Bradley. 

By Mr. Stone of Ward 3— For Clerk of Comlnit^. 
tees, William H. Lee. 

By Mr. Hiscock of Ward 21— For City Engineer, 
.Joseph P. Davis. 

By Mr. Dee of Ward 5— For Superintendent of 
Common and Public Grounds, John Galvin. 

By Mr. Clarke of Ward 22— For Superintendent 
of Public Lands, Robert W. Hall. 

By Mr. Richardson of Ward 10— For Water Reg- 
istrar—William F. Davis. 

By Mr. Thorndike of Ward 2— For City Surveyor 
—Thomas W. Davis. 

By Mr. Flynnof Ward 13— For Superintendent 
of Streets— Charles Harris. 

Severally accepted. Sent up. 

VENTILATION OF THE COUNCIL CHAMBER. 

Mr. Smardon of Ward 10 offered an order— That 
the Committee on Public Buildings be requested 
to consider and report upon the expediency of 
providing better ventilation in the Council cham- 
ber. Read twice and passed. Sent up. 

Adjourned, on motion of Mr. Spenceley ofgWard 
19. 



52 



BOARD OF' ALDERMEN. 



CITY OF BOS TON. 

Proceeding of the Board of Aldermen^ 

FEBRUARY 5, 1877. 



Regular meeting at four o'clock P.M., Alderman 
Clark, Chairman, presiding. 

EXECUTIVE NOMINATIONS. 

Folice Officer— Michael McMorrow. 

Sergeants of Police— Patrolmen Charles W. 
Hunt and George A. Walker. 

Constable— Thomas i^ee, Jr.; Solomon Hovey, 
Jr.. for special duty in Collector's Department. 

Police Officers -withoBt pay— John A. Whorf, 
Niekerson's wharf. East Boston; Koyal Boston, 
North-street Union Mission. 
' Severally confirmed. 

PETITIONS BBFEKRED. 

To the Joint Committee on the Survey and In- 
spection of Buildings. Petitions for leave to erect 
wooden buildings by Benjamin F. Teeling on 
Canal street, near Mill street, Charlestown ; A. 
Zeigler (to enlarge) on Decatur avenue. 

To the Joint Vomrtmittee on Assessors' DepaH- 
■mpnt. Nathan Matthews, for remission of tax for 
1875 on certain bonds that did not belong to him. 

To the Joint Committee on Streets. E. Worthen 
James et al. to have Poplar street and dock filled 
in as provided by the act of 1866, chapter 167. 

To the Com^nitfee on Licenses. John Quinn, for 
a hack stand near Old Colony Railroad station ; 
also near the Boston & Providence Railroad sta- 
tion. 

To the Joint Committee on Fire Department on 
the part of the Board. Remonstrance of L. S. 
Hapgood and 226 others, against allowing Jenney 
Brothers to erect buildings on First street, South 
Boston, for manufacturing and storing petroleum. 

To the Committee on Health on the part of the 
Board. Petitions for leave to occupy stables as 
follows: Timothy Wheaton, new wooden, one 
horse, 814 Sixth street; Edward Murphy, new 
wooden, one horse, Greenwich street, Ward 24; 
Patrick Welch, new wooden, two horses, Bennett 
street, near Market street. 

To the Joint Committee on Water. Boston 
Water Board, for leave to contract at the present 
time for iron pipes to be used during the year. 

T'o the Joint Commitlee on Public Lands. J. 
H. Hathorne, to^be relieved from a nuisance upon 
his premises on the Northampton-street district. 

To the Joint Committee on Common, etc. Tim- 
othy Splaine, for leave to put boats on the Public 
Garden Pond. 

To the Joint Committee on Claims. James 
Deshon, to be refunded a sum paid by him to the 
city for an invalid tax title; Rose Bennett, to be 
paid for personal injuries caused by an alleged 
defect in Genesee street; Thomas Bond, to be 
paid for personal injuries caused by an alleged de- 
fect in Border street. 

To the Committee on Pavinff. William J. Debus 
ct a^, laborers on the streets of Charlestown, for 
equalization ')r pay, etc. 

Metropolitan Railroad Company, for a track in 
Lenox street from Tremont street to Washington 
street. 

Petitions for leave to move two wooden build- 
ings by John B. Lord, 410 Main street. Ward 4, to 
391 Main street. 

ABATEMENT OF A CLAIM AGAINST A BANKRUPT. 

Alderman Wilder presented and had read a peti- 
tion from Hiram Johnson, representing that he is 
unable to pay his debts in full; that he is a debtor 
to the city of Boston in about $3600; that he can 
only pay thirty per cent, of bis indebtedness and 
that his creditors have generally consented to 
such a proposition. In case the creditors all con- 
sent to take such an offer the city of Boston is not 
secured, and he desires that the city consent to do 
so to save him from bankruptcy. 

Alderman Wilder— I move that the petition be 
referred to the Joint Committee on Health, with 
full powers to grant the prayer of the petitioner if 
in their judgment it ougbt to be granted. I will 
state now that I have fully investigated the mat- 
ter, and that it seems to me, and I think it will so 
appear to the committee, to be for the interest of 
the city to grant the prayer of the petitioner. I 
ask for a reference with such powers for the rea- 
son that a case is now pending, and if this action 
is not taken prior to the 15th it will render pro- 



ceedings in bankruptcy necessary to dissolve an 
attachment. 

Alderman Gibson— What was the debt incurred 
for? 

Alderman Wilder— It is a contract due to the 
Health Department for filling lands at the South 
End. 

Alderman Fitzgerald— Has not the city of Bos- 
ton a lien on the land for the filling ? 

Alderman Wilder— It has not; it has no lien. 

Alderman Fitzgerald— I move to strike out the 
words "full powers." I see no reason why the com- 
mittee should have full powers. 

Alderman Wilder — It is only a question of time. 

Alderman Fitzgerald- 1 see no reason for giving 
such important powers to the committee. In itself 
the petition amounts to nothing; but it estab- 
lishes a precedent, and by and by somebody else 
will be coming here, and if we object to doing what 
that person wants done this case will be cited as 
a precedent, and it will be the beginning of a 
series of such proceedings before the City Gov- 
ernment. For that reason I shall object to giving 
such full powers to any committee of this Board. 

The question was put on Alderman Fitzgerald's 
amendment and it was lost — i for, 5 against— by 
a standing vote. The motion of Alderman Wilder 
was then adopted, and it was ordered— That the 
petition of Hiram Johnson for an abatement of 
his assessment for the removal of a nuisance on 
his land be referred to the Joint Committee on 
Health, with full power to abate said assessment 
as they may judge expedient. Sent down. 

HOESE-KAILROAD TRACKS IN COLUMBUS AVENUE. 

The Board took up the special assignment for 
four o'clock, viz., the hearing on the petition of 
the Metropolitan Railroad Company for a location 
of tracks in Columbus avenue and Northampton 
street, an<l remonstrance against the petition of 
the Highland Railway Company for the same 
privilege. 

C. A. Richards, President of the Metropolitan 
Railroad, appeared for the petitioner and said the 
petition contained two parts, on the first part of 
which he would address them at length today. 
He knew the value of time to the Board and would 
be as brief as possible. He explained the petition 
in detail. They proposed to equip the line with as 
many new and elegant cars as may be nec- 
essary to , accommodate the residents on 
the line, and yet not add any more 
cars to the already large number on the 
street. Besides the special line they would prob- 
ably run the West End line through the avenue, 
and via Lenox street out Washington street to the 
Bartlett-street station. They asked this not to ac- 
commodate Jamaica Plain, Brookline or Crab Vil- 
lage, but the residents on the line, who will have 
communication with all parts of the city and the 
suburbs. Mr. Richards then called the witnesses 
for the petitioners. 

Rev. A. A. Miner, D. D., said the line would be a 
great convenience, giving them connecticm with 
every part of the city by the cars of this company. 
The regular attendants of the three churches on 
the avenue would be greatly convenienced. He 
preferred the Metropolitan Company because of 
its connections with other parts of the city, and it 
would be an act of justice to them. 

Colonel Lucius B.' Marsh appeared in the inter- 
est of residents and property owners in 333 houses 
on streets west of the avenue. He read a state- 
ment to the effect that the growth of the city had 
caused the cars to be increased west of Washing- 
ton street, and ultimately the establishment of the 
Lenox-street line, the latter fully answering its in- 
tended purpose. The company have been ready 
to lay a track in Columbus avenue for four years; 
but the residents thereon have several times ob- 
jected. Residents on streets crossing the avenue 
have always desired a railroad on the avenue, 
as the want of it has been detrimental 
to their property. When it was expected that the 
road would go down the avenue the property sold 
rapidly, but sales decreased when the contrary 
was decided on. Had the track been laid in 1872, 
the valuation on these houses would not have been 
reduced in 1875 and 1876, making a loss of over 
$320,000, and the lowest point has not yet been 
touched, as probably another $100,000 reduction 
will be made this year. If the railroad is granted, 
a further reduction will not be needed, though he 
did not believe an increase should be made this 
year. If any road is to have a track there 
it should be the Metropolitan, the cars starting 
from Lenox street. If the cars came from the 
Highlands they would be full and would not ac- 



FEBKUARY 



1877 



53 



commodate those living on or near the avenue. 
Clean cars just from the depot, with people of 
their own class, will be better than crowded cars 
from Roxbury crossing, Warren street and else- 
where. He spoke at length of the crowded con- 
dition of Tremont street along the Common, 
which would not be increased if the petition is 
granted. Many persons signed for the High- 
land road because they wanted some road; 
but they now prefer the Lenox-street line 
of the Metropolitan company. [To Mr. Sum- 
ner R. Mead, a remonstrant] — Own a house which 
has been occupied since it was built; but his own 
preference was not to have a railroad there ; am 
not a stockholder in the Metropolitan ; am not 
paid to appear here ; wrote the statement to read 
before the committee in favor of the Highland 
road, not knowing that this petition was to be 
heard. He always bowed to the public good as 
against his personal preferences. 

Mr. W. M. Parker, superintendent of the Lowell 
road, a resident on the avenue, thought it would 
be a great convenience to have a connection be- 
tween the avenue and the depots. The Metropoli- 
tan well accommodates the patrons of the Lowell 
road. [To E. W. James]— Thought it would be a 
great accommodation to go direct from the depots 
through Charles street to Columbus avenue. 

A. A. Folsom, residing on Appleton street, and 
superintendent of the Boston & Providence Rail- 
road, said his company would be glad to have 
more horse-railroad facilities to all parts of the 
cit^. He commended the Metropolitan for the 
facilities already furnished. [To E. W. James]— 
Would not like to express his opinion of the ac- 
commodation of people at the West End without 
seeing the plan. 

Asa H. Caton, residing at 161 West Chester park, 
had had his attention called to the question as a 
builder of houses on streets west of Columbus ave- 
nue, where many persons objected to buying be- 
cause of a want of horse-car accommodations. A 
special line from Lenox street would be prefera- 
ble to a line running through from the Highlands. 
[To Mr. Mead]— Some people had objected to buy- 
ing houses on the avenue for fear the cars would 
come there; never lost a sale on the avenue be- 
cause there were no cars there. Personally he had 
no particular wish about it ; believed the horse 
railroad must go down there. As a taxpayer he 
wanted to see the railroad laid before the street is 
repaved, which will soon be necessary. 

Mr. Loomis, residing on Holyoke street, near the 
avenue, believed it would be a great advantage to 
all residents in that vicinity. He preferred the 
Metropolitan road. 

This closed the evidence for the petitioners, and 
the remonstrants were heard. 

E. W. James wanted the Paving Committee to 
insist that the track be laid in a year or the loca- 
tion be void ; also that they be compelled to run 
direct to the depots via Charles street. 

Sumner R. Mead did not believe the Metropoli- 
tan road owned the City Government, and the 
same reasons for refusing the location are as po- 
tent today as p before. The people on Tremont 
street do not want less cars, and would protest 
against the petition if they knew that the avenue 
was to be accommodated at the expense of Tre- 
mont street. Grant this petition and in six months 
they will want to run the cars through the 
Common. There are 189 occupied houses on Co- 
lumbus avenue; over 100 representative men 
signed a remonstrance against the Highland pe- 
tition. The ladies of the avenue do not want any 
cars there; every mother's fear for the safety of 
her children would be increased tenfold. If the 
cars are to increase the taxation, don't send them, 
for they are taxed more than they can stand. 
He could point to a lady who walks on crutches 
from the farthest point from Tremont street, 
rather than have the avenue blockaded by 
cars. The people had a right to have one avenue 
left free from the cars. He believed their inter- 
ests safe in the hands of the Board. [To Alder- 
man Fitzgerald]- If either road is to have the lo- 
cation on the avenue, he don't know which way a 
majority would go ; but so far as his acquaintance 
goes they believed the Metropolitan road has the 
best facilities. [To Mr. Richards]— People on the 
avenue are well accommodated now. 

.John C. Haynes opposed any railroad there, but. 
thought the preponderance is in favor of the High- 
land, as the competition will insure better cars 
and accommodations. He opposed any location 
there, as a resident and a citizen. He thought 
there should be one avenue where people could 
ride comfortably without the nuisance of horse- 



railroad tracks. The ladies on the avenue almost 
unanimously oppose it. He did not believe prop- 
erty west of the avenue had depreciated for lack 
of cars ; but it was from the general state of the 
times. [To Mr. Richards] — The avenue is free 
from tracks for half a mile. Personally he did not 
care which road had it. 

Dr. O. S. Saunders said Mr. Mead's remarks cov- 
ered the ground. The residents on the avenue 
had expressed the same thoughts to him, especial- 
ly ladies and mothers, who dislike the noise 
and the breaking up of the display of carriages. 
He knew of many accidents this winter in getting 
over the car tracks, and he had spent over §100 
himself. There is no such thing as depreciation 
in property by the want of railroad tracks. He 
saw Colonel Harsh last week counting the houses 
on Greenwich park, and did that authorize him 
to appear for the occupants? So far 
as the speaker's acquaintances are con- 
cerned, they prefer to go to Tremont street. He 
also believed that the granting of the location 
would be followed by a petition to go across the 
Common. [To Mr. Richards]- Considered the 
horse cars more dangerous to life and limb than 
is the fast driving on the avenue. When the 
avenue is extended the cars will go straight into a 
district which would fill the cars before they got 
down to the lower part of the avenue; do not 
think the special line would give accommodations 
that will overbalance the disadvantages; should 
object to the Highland petition as well. 

Mr. Jackson said he usually drove in from 
Dorchester, and tracks in the avenue would 
be very objectionable. It is the only way he has 
of driving in and out except where there are 
tracks. 

John Shepard agreed with what Mr. Jackson 
and Mr. Mead had said, as did also Moses Merrow; 
the latter would consider his house deteriorated 
in value as soon as a track is laid there. J. G. Rus- 
sell opposed any track there, and has good accom- 
modation now ; but if any track is laid 
he preferred the Metropolitan. He paid $25,- 
000 for his house; lay a track there, 
and he will sell for $20,000. He instanced 
several cases to show that the lack of hoise cars 
is not a cause for depreciation. When Chester- 
park street is extended it will make a pleasant 
drive, but the laying of this track will spoil it. 
People leave Tremont street and drive down the 
avenue to insure safety. A track in the avenue 
will cause more depreciation of property than the 
absence of it. If any track is laid, he preferred 
the Metropolitan. 

Mr. Mead thanked the Board for their patience, 
and the remonstrants rested their case. 

Mr. Richards closed the case for the petition- 
ers, saying these railroad matinees are very 
tedious for the Board, who had been made the 
only tribunal to which they could come. He gave 
a history of the movement from 1872, when the 
Metropolitan were refused a location there. The 
remonstrants claimed that the petitioners had 
presented nothing new; but could anything be 
older than the selfish reasons given by the remon- 
strants. This company come not to enter into a 
contest for this thing, but a rival corporation had 
petitioned for the location. It will be said that 
the Metropolitan is a monopoly. Every man is a 
monopoly. The chairman of the Board is a monop- 
oly, for twenty-flve years ago he began to educate 
himself for the position he now holds. So for 
twenty-flve years the Metropolitan had been edu- 
cating itself for this time. If ic had avenues it 
was ijecause they honestly asked for them 
to accommodate the public. Tne Metropolitan 
had furnished cheap transportation to cheap 
homes in the suburbs, and without it annexation 
would have been a failure. The cry of monopoly 
is all humbug. When an individual or an institu- 
tion studies and masters a subject, and begins to 
reap the benefit thereof, the cry of monopoly is 
raised — put them down, and put up some one else. 
Mr. Richards again explained the object of 
the petition and the needs of the peo- 
ple west of Columbus avenue, citing in- 
stances to show that the location of tracks 
was a benefit to property on a street. He gave his 
word that in the early spring the company would 
put on a fine line of cars fitted for the business; 
but he would not guarantee "centennial" or "gilt- 
edged" cars. He had come without a petition in 
aid of this petition, and he had presented all the 
petitions ot a certain kind that he intended to. 
When he could get 100 names for fifty cents for 
any petition, he would not cheapen his case by 
presenting them, as he knew that the Board had 



54 



BOAl^JU OF ALI^EIriMEN, 



common sense enough to decide the question 
without a long array of petitioners whose signa-' 
tures could be obtained at two cents a piece. 

Mr. Merrill, President of the Highland Railway 
Company, asked that the Board reserve their 
judgment until after the hearing on the petition 
of that company. 

On motion of Alderman Fitzgerald, the subject 
was recommitted to the Committee on Paving. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Order for Committee on Police to make all re- 
pairs which may be necessary for the care and 
preservation of the several police stations and the 
police steamboat. Passed. 

Order for Committee on Police to provide from 
time to time such furniture and supplies as may 
be needed at the several station houses. Passed. 

Order for the Committee on Police to make all 
needful arrangements for keeping the horses of 
the Police Department. Passed. 

LOITERING ON STAIRS AND CORRIDORS OF CITY 
HALL. 

The order for the Chief of Police to take meas- 
ures to prevent persons loitering on the stairs or 
corridors of the City Hall, thus preyenting free 
access to some of the oflftces, was considered under 
unfinished business. 

Alderman O'Brien — There is something in that 
order which appears to be very objectionable. I 
can certainly see no good reason for its passage, 
and I am almost surprised that such an order was 
ever sent to this Board. We all know that there 
are thousands of poor people out of employment 
— deserving, good citizens— who cannot find work 
outside, and they come here to see if they cannot 
find employment. They know that hundreds of 
men are employed in the Paving Department, and 
in the departments of Lamps and Health, and 
I think it is noble in them to come here 
seeking employment, and trying to get a 
few days' work to furnish bread for their 
families. I think it will be cruel to turn 
those men into the streets, and if you pass 
that order I believe it will put it into the 
bands of the Chief to turn them into the street. 
The doors of City Hall should be open to the rich 
and the poor, the high and low alike ; and I do not 
believe in any such order. I move that it be in- 
definitely postponed. 

Alderman Robinson — I am perfectly surprised 
that the Alderman makes such an objection. 
That is not the object of the order that he states. 
This City Hall is not to be made a loafing i^lace. 
There is nothing in that order that prevents any 
jierson from coming here that has any business 
with the city. There is nothing that prevents 
anybody from coming here to get employment in 
the Paving Department. It is only intended to 
remove those who loaf on the stairs. It is for 
those persons who have no business here that the 
order is intended. It has sometimes been almost 
impossible to get up stairs without the aid of a 
policeman. 

Alderman O'Brien — I think that if we have a 
little patience all this will disappear as soon as 
we elect our heads of departments and Assessors. 
I have no doubt that some of those loiterers are 
candidates for heads of departments and Asses- 
sors. I know that the Superintendent of Streets 
is greatly annoyed, but we cannot help that. The 
order is aimed at only those poor laborers who 
loiter on our stairs hoping to get work, and I 
move that it be indefinitely postponed. 

Alderman Robinson — The Alderman says this 
order is entirely aimed at the iDoor laboring men. 
I deny the statement. It is not so. 

The question on indefinite postponement was 
put and declared carried— 2 for, 1 against. Alder- 
man Robinson called for the yeas and nays, and 
the motion to indefinitely wostpone prevailed— 10 
yeas, 1 nay : 

Yeas— Aldermen Breck, Clark, Dunbar, Fitz- 
gerald, Gibson, O'Brien, Slade, Thompson, Viles, 
"Wilder— 10. 

Nay — Alderman Robinson — 1. 

Absent— Alderman Burnham. 

PAPERS FROM THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Petitions were referred in concurrence. 
Annual report of City Engineer. (City Doc. No. 
15.) Placed on file. 

Order for Committee on Health to consider the 
expediency of effecting a reduction in the cost of 
the removal of night soil. 

Alderman Viles— The committee are powerless 
, in that matter until next year, as the contract 
' does not expire until the 31st of next December. 



Nothing can be done in regard to it at the present 

time. 

The order was passed in concurrence; 

Order for flags to be displayed and bells to be 
rung on the 22d of February, Washington's Birth- 
day. Pabsed in concurrence— yeas 11, nays 0. 

An order prescribing a uniform for Fire Com- 
missioners, and directing them to conform to 
"General Order No 60," relating to wearing of 
uniforms, came up referred to Committee on 
the Fire Department. Concurred. 

Report and order to rescind order of Sept. 30, 
1867, for a loan of $150,000 for Oliver-street Im- 
provement, and for a transfer from unexpended 
appropriations of this financial year of the sum, 
less revenue received, advanced by Treasurer un- 
der said loan, to meet Auditor's drafts drawn in 
payment for said Oliver-street Improvement. 
Order passed in concurrence — ^yeas 11, nays 0. 

Order for Committee on Public Buildings to 
consider the expediemy of providing better venti- 
lation for the Common Council Chamber. Passed 
in concurrence. 

Reports of committees, nominating— William 
H. Lee as Clerk of Committees; Charles Harris, 
Superintendent of Streets; Joseph P. Davis, City 
Engineer; Robert W. Hall, Superintendent of 
Public Lands; William H. Bradley, Superinten- 
dent of Sewers ; John P. Healy, City Solicitor ; 
John Galvin, Superintendent of Common, etc.; 
William F. Davis, Water Registrar; Thomas W. 
Davis, City Surveyor. Severally accepted. 

EQUITABLE VALUATION OF PROPERTY, 

An order came up for the Mayor to appoint a 
commission of three to consider a plan for a more 
uniform and equitable valuation of property for 
taxation, at an expense not to exceed $300. 

Alderman Fitzgerald— I must confess that I 
have tried to study that order up, but I cannot 
see what is to be accomplished by it. If any mem- 
ber of this Board can give me an intelligent idea 
of what this commission will be able to accom- 
plish in its recommendations, so that this Board 
shall govern the Assessors, if such a thing can be 
done, so that their oaths of office shall be gov- 
erned by our opinions, then 1 shall vote for it. 
The Assessors take an oath to value property m a 
certain way, and it seems to me that it is the 
appointment of a commission to find out 
how to value ■ estates and control the oaths 
of the Assessors which they take when 
they accept the positions of Assessors. If any one 
can show me what good can be done I should be 
happy to vote for it. But in the present condition 
of affairs, and not understanding the order, I can- 
not vote for it. 

Alderman Thompson— I do n't quite understand 
the order myself , but I have been inf ormedwhat was 
the desire of the party who introduced the order, 
he feeling aggrieved at the course the Assessors 
had pursued for several years ; that they were run- 
ning in a certain rut, and that it was impossible to 
get them out of it. ,He thought that a commission 
outside of the Assessors might suggest something 
which would be of advantage to the citizens gen- 
erally. I don't know that anything can be 
done or that any advice can be given to 
the Assessors ; but on the principle that two heads 
are better than one, it may (.be for that reason 
that the order was introduced. I certainly think 
myself that something should be done, because 
any member of this Board wno has been associat- 
ed on certain committees will realize that there 
are many discrepancies in valuations, and it oc- 
curred to me that no harm can be done for a com- 
mission of this kind to be appointed, and perhaps 
some good might result from it ; and as the ex- 
pense is so limited I shall vote for the order. 

Alderman Gibson— All I see is we are paying 
some four or five thousand dollars annually to 
persons to assess our property, and here comes an 
order to investigate the whole subject of taxation 
at an expense of $300. Either we are paying too 
much now, or else there is not enough money 
named in the order to make it practicable. It 
seems to me that we cannot get competent par- 
ties to take hold of it for that. It will take three 
times $300 to get an expert to work on the sub- 
ject. 

Alderman Fitzgerald— This whole matter of as- 
sessment and abatement of taxes is regulated by 
the statutes of the Commonwealth, which this 
Board have no control over whatever. This com- 
mission can only recommend some plan by which 
the taxpayers might receive some abatement 
from the taxes received by the city of Boston, 
No commission can prescribe a rule to govern 



FEB U U A R Y 



1877, 



55 



the oaths of the five Assessors, and the 
thirty-three Assistant Assessors. They take an 
oath to assess property according to their opinion ; 
it may be higlier than a great many other people 
think it shoukl be, but it is their return. If the 
party is aggrieved there can be a hear- 
ing before the County Commissioners, and in 
Suffolk County the hearing is had before the 
Board of Street Commissioners. Now, can this 
$300 commission do anything better than the plan 
prescribed by the statutes of the Commonwealth? 
Because parties Iia ve a little grievance— and I un- 
derstand the Alderman opposite [Alderman 
Thompson] to say that some parties have been 
aggrieved — because parties ha,ve been aggrieved 
they try to get something passed to meet their 
particular case. If the parties are aggrieved they 
have recourse to the Board of Street Commission- 
ers. The act says — 

"Any person aggrieved by the taxes assessed 
upon him may apply to the Assessors for abate- 
ment thereof; and, if he makes it appear that he 
is taxed at more than his just proportion, they 
shall make a reasonable abatement." 

"The powers formerly exercised by the Board of 
Aldermen of Boston, as County Commissioners, in 
relation to the abatement of taxes, are now exer- 
cised by the Board of Street Commissioners." 

And they can do that. Now can this proposed 
commission devise a better way ? I have no doubt 
that the property in Boston is now assessed at 
more than it should be; but how can we get at it 
by this ? This commission is something I cannot 
see the necessity for. 

Alderman O'Brien— The dissatisfaction that ex- 
ists against the assessed vaUiation of our city 
property is widespread. There is scarcely a man 
in the city of Boston that owns a piece of proper- 
ty, if it is real estate, but feels dissatisfied with 
the assessment put upon his property. I know he 
can go to the Street Commissioners and present 
his claim, but what does it entail upon him? It 
takes his time and perhaps it may take his money. 
He may have to call in a lawyer to plead his case 
for him, and it is disagreeable for any man to ap- 
pear here before the authorities in City Hall to 
get an abatement of his taxes. ' I say 
It is almost impossible for a man to get 
an abatement of his taxes unless he has 
the patience of a Job and will follow it up 
month after month until he succeeds. I say this 
dissatisfaction is widespread. If we could get a 
commission that would serve without compensa- 
tion— like the Park Commissioners,who have given 
us a great deal of information on the subject of 
parks — for instance, distinguished lawyers who 
would look into this subject and recommend some 
changes in the law by which we might get some 
more equitable system of taxation, I don't see 
any objection to it. And there is one thing that 
we migbt do every year, and that is elect the most 
intelligent men to assess our property, and that is 
where we fail every year in not electing men of 
the right kind to assess our property. 
After we have elected the board for 
the year they are beyond our reach ; 
they are under statute law and they fix 
the valuation themselves. I believe that the as- 
sessment of our property for years past has been a 
humbug — that there is scarcely a piece of property 
in the city of Boston today that is assessed correct- 
ly, and we have been going up and going up, and 
never looking ahead to see where we are going to, 
and now we see that if our property was assessed 
at its true value almost every public improvement 
in the city of Boston would have to stop. As I 
said before, if this commission could give us some 
information upon the subject, even if only recom- 
mendations as to the alteration of the statute laws, 
I should be willing to vote for it. There 
was a commission appointed some years 
ago by the State, but they devoted most 
of their time to the taxation of church 
property, and they gave us some excellent ideas 
on the subject. Now, if we had a commission of 
intelligent men who would be willing to devote 
some little time to the subject and give their ser- 
vices gratuitously to the city, I would not object 
to it. 

Alderman Fitzgerald— The Alderman must not 
think that because I rise to speak against the 
order I am opposed to lowering the taxes. I own 
a little property and I wish it was taxed lower, for 
it would be money in my pocket. But this order 
means a roving commission. It means nothing. 
If it means anything it means that the Assessors' 
valuation shall be difEerent from what the Assess- 
ors believe it should be. I think the whole 



cause of the wrong has been with the 
Board of Aldermen and the Common Council in 
the election of Assessors, in the selection of men 
whose only competency is the persistency with 
which they buttonhole members of the City Gov- 
ernment. If the Board of Aldermen and the Com- 
mon Council would select men for the offices of 
First and Assistant Assessors because they know 
the value of real estate, and because they are 
judges of its value, independent of its assessment 
the year before, you would have an etxuitable as- 
sessment. But the First and Second Assistant 
Assessors, as they are elected now, know no more 
about the value of property than a monkey does 
of the organ that he is on top of, and they take 
the standard by the value fixed last year; they 
say, We must n't put this down this year, and 
so the taxes are up so high that they startle the 
citizens of Boston. I say that if you could devise 
some better way to elect Assessors the planjof as- 
sessment would be better. I agree with the Alder- 
man that our real estate is taxed unjustly, because 
it is taxed unequally. We are, in consequence, 
obliged to bear the burdens of the State tax un- 
justly. I fail to see what good the commission is 
going to accomplish, but 1 shall ofller no objection 
to the order. 

On motion of Alderman Wilder the order was 
laid on the table. 

EEPOETS OF CITV OrFICEKS. 

City Registrar. Report that during 1876 there 
were 10,626 births in Boston, a decrease of 394 from 
1875; certificates of intentions of marriage issued, 
3391, a decrease of 597; received for said certifi- 
cates, $1695.50; deaths recorded, 8200, a decrease of 
758. Sent down. 

Superintendent of Markets. Report for quarter 
ending Jan. 31 — Received and paid to City Collect- 
or, $26,776.72. Placed on file. 

Overseers of the Poor. Report for quarter 
ending Jan. '31— Receipts, $40,773.52; expended, 
$35,380.01 ; cash balance, §6614.88. Sent down. 

Auditor of Accounts. Exhibit of the appro- 
priations Feb. 1— Total, .')i!17,356,127.48; expended, 
$11,425,047.45; unexpended, $5,931,080.03. 

Sent down. 

City Solicito) . Annual report showing the num- 
ber or cases pending in which this city is a party. 

Sent down. 

Superintendent of Public Buildings. Annual 
report for 1876. [City Doc. 16.] Sent down. 

The expenditures for repairs, alterations and 
improvements of public buiklings include all the 
buildings belonging to or hired by the city, excei^t 
schoolhouses and county buildings, used for the 
accommodation of the City Government and the 
various departments. This class of buildings 
numbers 126. The amount expended on such 
for the past year has been $99,583.35. The income 
from rents to the city for the year was $134,047. 
The amount expended on county buildings was 
$42,900.09. The total number of buildings occu- 
pied for school purposes owned by the city is 163, 
containing 1296 schoolrooms; in addition, colonies 
are established in 17 buildings hired for that pur- 
pose, furnishing 30 schoolrooms, making the total 
number of buildings in which school sessions are 
held 180, containing 1326 schoolrooms. The expen- 
ditures for ordinary repairs, supplies and furni- 
ture for these houses the past year have been 
$126,635.37. The extraordinary expenses of this 
department are those for the erection of new and 
alterations of old buildings, for which appro- 
priations are made by order of the City Council. 
Special appropriations tor seventeen new public 
buildings have been in charge of this deiaartment 
during the past year. The total amount in ap- 
propriations for these buildings, including the 
heating and furnishing of a portion of the same, 
is $634,800. This includes the amount appro- 
priated by the City Council the past year, together 
with the amount carried over from the previous 
year. The Superintendent gives a hrief statement 
of the new work completed during the year. 

The estimated valuation of the several county, 
public buildings and schoolhouses, including fur- 
niture, land, etc., is as follows : 

County »2,000,000 

Public buildiEgs 6,434,364 

Schoolhouses 7,996,500 

Total $16,430,864 

BONB Al'l'llOVED. 

The bond of Josej^h R. Rowe, constable, being 
liresented duly certified, was approved. 



56 



BOARD OF AJLiDli^RlVIiLN 



^•OMIXATIONS AND ELECTIONS. 

Oity Messenger. Alderman Thompson submitted 
a report nominating Alvah H. Peters for City 
Messenger. Accepted, and on motion of Alder- 
man Thompson an election was ordered. Com- 
mittee—Aldermen Thompson, Wilder. Alvah H. 
Peters received eleven votes, the whole number 
cast, and was declared elected. Sent down. 

Superintendent of Public Suildinris. Alderman 
Thompson submitted a report nominating James 
C. Tucker for Superintendent of Public Buildings. 
Accepted. Sent down. 

Assessors. Alderman Wilder moved that the 
Board proceed to an election for Assessors. 

Alderman Fitzgerald— I do not like to appear 
here continually in the role of an objector to mo- 
tions of this kind, but 1 feel compelled, as the 
chairman of the Committee on Retrenchment and 
Reduction of Salaries, to ask that all these nomi- 
nations be laid upon the table until the report of 
that committee is made. If the Board of Alder- 
men mean business, and do not intend to make 
this cvy of reform a farcical thing, as it has been 
for two or three years, if the plant is going to 
blossom and bear fruit, I hope the Board will be- 
gin by laying all the nominations upon the 
table. The Government will not suffer. We have 
February, March and April in which to elect 
them, and the Committee on Retrenchment 
will report in about two weeks from tonight, and 
then we can vote intelligently upon all of those 
officers. Elect all the officers and you cannot con- 
solidate the departments and you do not know 
where you are going to land. Elect them and you 
will draw a lobby into City Hall that will prevent 
any reduction of the salaries of the city officials. 
Keep them on the table, and if decency v/ill not, 
fear will prevent them from coming and button- 
holing members of the Board of Aldermen. If 
you accept the report of the committee — and I in- 
tend to give good reasons for it — you can then act 
more intelligently. We have this very subject of 
consolidation of the Assessors under consideration. 
When the committee have made their report there 
is an end of it. I have no friends to reward 
or enemies to punish, but I think that the 
good of the taxpayers requires that the expenses 
should be cut down. And I do not care who suf- 
fers by it. I only ask that the members of this 
and the other branch may be able to deal intelli- 
gently with the subject. " I only ask them to wait 
till we report what commissions can be consoli- 
dated ; but if you elect them now, that will be an 
end of the work of the Committee on Retrench- 
ment. 

Alderman Wilder — In making the motion to pro- 
ceed to an election now, it was merely to forward 
the business of the City Government, which has 
got to be done. I don't want to throw any obsta- 
cles in the way of retrenchment. It is a bard work 
which my friend has undertaken; I know he 
will accomplish a great deal of good, and I hope it 
will be done. But we have Ave principal Assessors, 
and if we proceed to elect them there will be no 
more than there are now. The Committee on 
Assessors' Department desired to have the Board 
act upon them, for I am free to say that there is a 
great deal of pressure and buttonholing. 
The committee have not lacked tor gentle- 
men who are very anxious to serve the city in 
this capacity, and we want to get through with 
them. I understand that the Retrenchment Com- 
mittee are likely to make some change in the 
Assessors' Department— perhaps reduce the num- 
ber of First and Second Assistant Assessors two or 
three. What their purpose or plan is I don't 
know; only I am prepared to support it if it goes 
for retrenchment or reform. But I fail to see how 
it is to change the action of the committee wheth- 
er we elect three or four Assessors. I don't wish 
to press this to a vote this evening. I have no 
axe to grind. We only submitted our nomina- 
tions, and only desire action now because we 
thought it would facilitate the future work of the 
committee. For myself I don't wish to press it. 

Alderman Gibson— I like the remarks of the 
Committee on Retrenchment, and I fully indorse 
them to the utmost. It seems to me we ought to 
know how many we are going to have before we 
go into an election here. It we can curtail the 
departments, and cut down to a thousand dollars 
where we now pay thirty-five hundred, I think it 
would be quite as well to wait. I should hope that 
the committee would be diligent in their labors. 

Alderman Wilder withdrew the motion to pro- 
ceed to an election. 

MEBIDIAN-STKEET BRIDGE. 

Alderman Thompson offered an order— That 



Meridian-street Bridge be closed to all public 
travel on Tuesday, Feb. 6, and remain closed until 
certain repairs thereon are completed. Read 
twice and passed. 

PIPE FOB WATEB WOBKS. 

Alderman Thompson offered an order — That the 
Boston Water Board be authorized to contract for 
the delivery of the cast iron pipe required for the 
ordinary work of the Water Department during 
the next financial year; the amount of said con- 
tracts, not exceeding $43,000, to be paid from the 
appropriations to be made for the Water Depart- 
ment for the financial year 1877-78. Read twice 
and passed. Sent down. 

FRANKLIN FUND. 

Alderman Wilder submitted a report from the 
Special Committee on the petition of Albert G. 
Rockwood for a loan of $250 from the Franklin 
Fund, that he comes within the conditions of the 
bequest, and as his proposed bondsmen are satis- 
factory his request should be granted. Accepted. 

SWING SIGNS. 

Alderman Robinson submitted a report from 
the Committee on Police in favor of granting 
leave to M. E. Shorey to project a plain lantern 
at No. 11 Cross street, with the word "Hotel" or 
"Lodging" painted thereon, provided it is secured 
satisfactory to the Inspector of Buildings. Ac- 
cepted. 

OMNIBUS AND STAGE LINES. 

Alderman Fitzgerald submitted the following, 
from the Committee on Licenses : 

Report on petition of (^eorge AV. Sawin with an 
order— That leave be granted to George W. Sawin 
to run a passenger wagon from Cragie's Bridge to 
* India-wharf Market once a day each way, for the 
accommodation of marketmen'and others. Order 
read twice and passed. 

Report on petition of Robinson & Emerton with 
an order— That leave be granted to Robinson & 
Emerton to run two passenger wagons from the 
Boston & Maine Railroad station through Wash- 
ington, Broad and High streets to Rowe's and 
India wharves, and to return by the same route, at 
a rate of fare iiOt exceeding ten cents per passen- 
ger each way. This license to commence May 1, 
1877, and to continue until Oct. 1, 1877. Order read 
twice and passed. 

Report on petition of Colman & Wellington 
with an order — That permission be granted Colman 
& Wellington to run two passenger wagons from 
Bowdoin square through Court, State, Kilby, 
Oliver and High streets to Rowe's and India 
wharves, and to return by the same route, at a 
rate of fare not exceeding ten cents per passenger 
each way ; this license to commence on the 1st 
day of May next, and to terminate on the 1st day 
of October next succeeding. Order read twice 
and passed. 

LICENSES. 

Alderman Fitzgerald submitted reports from 
the Committee on Licenses as follows : 

Minors' Applications Granted— Forty-six news- 
boys; one bootblack. 

Amusement Licenses Granted — Warren-street 
Chapel Association, to hold a festival in Music Hall 
on Feb. 22; W. C. Huntley, for variety enteitain- 
ment at Wait's Hall, Feb. 12. 

Dealer in Second-hand Clothing Licensed — Da- 
vid Kurtz, 54 Merrimac street. 

Amusement License Refused — Mrs. Liliie E. 
Hersey, for sociables on Wednesday and Saturday 
evenings, at 24 Tremont row. 

Auctioneers Licensed— Jesse L. Nason & Co., 
21 School street; W. E. Nowlan, 11 Pemberton 
square; Harry M. Joel, 281 Broadway. 

Victuallers Licensed— William Jones, 890 Wash- 
ington street; Brooks Brothers, 700 Washington 
street; A. J. Washburn, 135-137 Blackstone street; 
Charles A. Hackett, 519 Tremont street. 

Junk Dealer Licensed— John William Collins, 
171/2 Spring Lane. 

Dealer in Second-Hand Articles Licensed— 
Rappael Back, 1234 Tremont street. 

Severally accepted. 

PUBLIC LANDS. 

Alderman O'Brien submitted the following from 
the Joint Committee on Public Lands : 

Report and order— That upon the petition of 
Henrietta L. T. Wolcott, wife of John W. Wolcott, 
the Mayor be and he is hereby authorized to exe- 
cute to the said Henrietta L. T. Wolcott a con- 
firmation deed of the land intended to be conveyed 
to her by deed from the city of Boston, dated 
Oct. 17. 1871, and recorded with Suffolk Deeds, 
liber 1075, folio 74, in accordance with the prayer 
of said petitioner. Order read twice and passed. 
Sent down. 



FEBRUARY 5, 1877 



57 



Report of leave to withdraw on petition of heirs 
of Charles Davis et al., for abatement of assess- 
ment on Northampton-street District. Accepted. 
Sent down. 

CLAIM SETTLED. 

Alderman O'Brien submitted a report from the 
Joint Committee on Claims that they have settled 
the claim for personal injuries sustained on Ex- 
change street by Dennis Manahan by the pay- 
ment of $150. Accepted. Sent down. 

LAND DAMAGES, ETC. 

Alderman Thompson submitted the following 
from the Committee on Streets on the part of the 
Board : 

Orders to pay for land taken and damages oc- 
casioned—William F. Bell, $1000, widening of 
Shawmut avenue; J. L. Sartwell and the heirs of 
John Humphrey, $581, widening of Shawmut ave- 
nue. Severally read twice ano passed. 

Report that no action is necessary on petition of 
Caleb H. Dolbeare, for abatement of Atlantic-ave- 
nue betterment, he having settled the same. Ac- 
cepted. 

MASSACHUSETTS CHARITABLE MECHANIC BUILD- 
ING ON THE COMMON. 

Among the petitions and remonstrances received 
and read in the regular order were the following: 

To the Honorable City Council of Boston— The 
undersigned, citizens arid business men of Boston, 
respectful! V favor the application of the Massa- 
chusetts Charitable Mechanic Association for per- 
mission to erect a temporary building on the pa- 
rade ground of Boston Common, next fall, for its 
triennial exposition of industry and art, and join 
with the association in asking that its petition 
may be granted. 

Boston, January, 1877. 

Leopold Morse, George F. Baldwin, John Cum- 
mings, Jerome Jones, Asa P. Potter, Ivers W. 
Adams, Isaac Fenno & Co., Beard, Moulton & 
Bouv6, William Claflin, Edwin H. Sampson, Ed- 
ward P. Wilbur, R. Worthington, C. M. Clapp & 
Co., Clapp & Balderstone, Henry C. Hunt & Co., 
Dennison & Co., William Mor.=e, Herman Askenasy, 
Chas. Whitney, Albert A. Cobb, Geo. C. Barrett, 
Gilbert Attwo"od, H. M. Bearce, Sam'l E. Sawyer. 
L. H. Palmer, ticket agent Fall River Line; J. W 
Richardson, agent Stonington Shore Line; Edwin 
M. Bacon, Chas. H. Taylor, Chas. A. Smith & Co. 

To the Honorable City Council of Boston— The 
undersigned, citizens and business men of Boston, 
respectfully favor the application of the Massa- 
chusetts Charitable Mechanic Association for per- 
mission to erect a temporary building on the 
parade ground of Boston Common next fall, for 
its triennial exposition of industry and art, and 
join with the association in asking that its peti- 
tion may be granted. 

Boston, January, 1877. 

Charles G. Greene, J. Warren Faxon, J. F. Mor- 
rill, F. W. Bird, Henry H. Barrows, Lyman Boyn- 
ton, J. J. Richards, D. Sturtevant, John French, 
Anthony Hanson, Wm. Gaston, Edwin Pope, Wm. 
B. Munfoe, B. D. Whitcomb, W. P. Emerson Piano 
Co., W. Moore, Chas. E. Jenkins, E. S. Tobey. D. 
N. Skillings, John W. Candler, Albert Bowker, 
Richard Briggs, Roberts Bros., Joseph F. Travers, 
Wm. A. Hovey, Frank Hill Smith, Erastus B. Big- 
elow. 

To the Board of Aldermen of the City of Bos- 
ton—The undersigned, citizens of or taxpayers in 
Boston, respectfully remonstrate against per- 
mission being given to any persons to erect build- 
ings on the Common for other than municipal 
purposes. 

They also petition your honorable Board to 
grant a hearing on the subject before any. deci- 
sion is made. 

[Signed] W. H. Whitmore, John C. Ropes, Ab- 
bott Lawrence, Geo. O. ShattJick, Geo. S. Hale, 
George B. Chase, A. C. Martin, C. C. Jackson, Jo- 
seph Healy, Jacob Sleeper by J. H. S., Clement 
Hugh Hill, Prentiss Cummings, Wm. S. Macfar- 
lane, J. Henry Sleeper, Saml. T. Morse, Josiah F. 
Guild, J. Orne Green, Ed. F. Daland, Samuel S. 
Shaw, C. E. Hubbard, A. Minot, Jr., G. W. Bald- 
win, Dwight Foster, Benj. F. Stevens, Sewell Tap- 
pan, Jos. M. Gibtiins, John Gardner, W. Amory, 
T. Jefferson Coolidge, E. R. Mudge, Sawyer & Co., 
Weeks & Potter, John D. Bryant, O. W. Peabody, 
Preston & Merrill, Perkins & Job, lasigi & Co., 
Cutler Bros. & Co., Barney Cory, Dexter Brothers, 
Charles E. French, Horatio E. Swasey. '^ 

Alderman Robinson — The Committee on Com- 
mon anfl Squares have made up a report, upon 
that subject, and I move that that report be read 
at this time. 



The Chairman — The report has not yet come in. 

Alderman Robinson — Then I move that the 
whole subject be laid upon the table for the time 
being. 

The motion prevailed. 

Later in the session Alderman Robinson sub- 
mitted a report from the Joint Committee on 
Common, etc., on petition of the Massachusetts 
Charitable Mechanic Association for leave to 
erect a building on the Common for the purposes 
above rei erred to, and the petition of Otis Nor- 
cross et al., in aid of the same, with an order 
granting said petition. The chairman proceeded 
to read the report and Alderman Fitzgerald asked 
if It was a long report, as if it was he would 
move that it be laid on the table and printed. 

Alderman Robinson — It was my intention to put 
it to a vote, if possible. Those parties are waiting 
to know what action this Board of Alderman will 
take, and their future action will depend upon 
our decision tonight. It will take some little time 
to erect such a building, and I propose to take the 
sense of the Board tonight. 

Alderman Fitzgerald— I should be decidedly op- 
posed to action tonight. It is a very serious ques- 
tion, this granting leave to put a building upon 
the Common. I do not know that I shall oppose 
or favor it, but I want some time to consider it, 
especially as respectable citizens have come here 
and asked for a hearing, for I think they ought to 
have one. The petitioners have received a hear- 
ing, and the remonstrants are respectable persons 
and they should be heard before the Board of 
Aldermen or a committee, before final action is 
taken in the matter of allowing a building to be 
placed upon the Common. 

Alderman Robinson— It was not my intention to 
press it to a vote tonight, except by unanimous 
consent of the Board. I should like to have the 
report read. 

Alderman Thompson — I agree with the Alder- 
man in regard to what is due to the remonstrants 
in regard to giving them a hearing, and I trust 
they will be given a bearing before the full Board 
as soon as possible. It seems to me the best thing 
we can do is to lay the report upon the table and 
have it printed, and then take up the remon- 
strance and fix a time for a hearing. I move that 
the report be laid upon the table. 

Alderman Fitzgerald— Perhaps the better way 
would be to refer the whole report back to the 
committee, with the petitions and remonstrances, 
with instructions to give them a hearing and then 
they can be heard. Or, if the members of the 
Board want to be bored by a public hearing, we 
can grant them one next Monday. 

The Chairman — The remonstrants ask for aihear- 
ing, but do not say whether before the full Board 
or a committee. 

Alderman O'Brien— I understand from some of 
the remonstrants that they would be satisfied with 
a hearing before a committee. If they have a 
hearing before the Board it will occupy several 
hours, as there are some fifty or seventy-five wit- 
nesses to be called upon to testify. I think it had 
better be referred to the Committee on Common, 
with instructions to give them a hearing, and that 
the petitions be referred t<j the same committee. 

The motion to recommit and refer prevailed. 
Sent down. 

Later in the session Alderman Thompson said, 
As a matter of courtesy to the members of the 
Committee on Common who presented the report, 
I move a reconsideration of the vote referring it 
back to the committee, so that it may be read to 
the Board. 

Alderman O'Brien — With all due respect to the 
gentleman and to our chairman, who is a good 
reader, I should prefer to take this report at my 
leisure and read it in print. 

Alderman Thompson— As the gentleman who 
offered the report desired that it may be read I 
hope he will be gratified. 

Alderman O'Brien — I was merely considering 
the time of the Board. If the worthy Alderman 
from the Dorchester District desires to have the 
report read I shall not raise any further objection. 

Alderman Fitzgerald— I have no particular ob- 
jection to the reading of the reportj but if I were 
a member of the committee I should consider the 
fact that certain people have come here remon- 
strating against the passage of the order that they 
have reported, and I should much prefer that my 
report would not be published until I heard what 
they had to say. 

Alderman "Thompson withdrew the motion at 
the request of Alderman Robinson. 

Adjourned, on motion of Alderman Tlioinpsoii. 



U.-V 



58 



COMMON OOUNOIL 



CITY OF BOSTON. 

Proceedings of the Oommon Council, 

FEBRUARY 8, 1877. 



Regular meeting at 71/2 o'clock P. .M., Beniamln 
Pope, Presidentj in the cnair. 

PAVERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Reports of City Solicitor and Superintendent of 
Public Buildings; Annual Report of City Regis- 
trar; Quarterly Report of Overseers of Poor; Au- 
ditor's Monthly Exhibit. Severally placed on file. 

Petitions were referred in concurrence. 

Recommitment to Committee on Common (to 
give a public hearing) of report and order in favor 
of erection of a temporary building on the Com- 
mon for Triennial Exhibition of Massachusetts 
Charitable Mechanic Association. Concurred. 

Report that claim of Dennis Mannahan to be 
paid for personal injuries has been settled for 
$150. Accepted in concurrence. 

Report leave to vyithdravvf on petition of heirs of 
Charles Davis and others, for abatement of assess- 
ments on Northampton-street district. Accepted 
in concurrence. 

Order to refer, with full povi^er, to the Commit- 
tee on Assessors' Department the petition of 
Hiram Johnson for an abatement of assessment 
for removal of a nuisance. Read twice and passed 
in concurrence. 

Report and order for a confirmative deed of 
land to be conveyed to H. L. T. Wolcott, as therein 
set forth. Accepted in concurrence. 

NOMINATIONS AND ELECTIONS. 

City Messenger. A report came down nominat- 
ing, with certificate of election, Alvah H. Peters 
as City Messenger. 

The report was accepted in concurrence. 

Mr. Pierce of "Ward 18—1 move a suspension of 
the rule, that the Council may proceed to an elec- 
tion. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 13—1 hope the rule will not 
be suspended tonieht, for the reason that we have 
now out a Committee on Retrenchment and Sala- 
ries, and until they report I think it would be dis- 
courtesy to them to ballot for any of these officers. 

Mr. Jackson of Ward 16 — Does the gentleman 
refer to the election of City Messenger only, or 
does he calculate to go into the election of all the 
officers? 

The President— The motion refers specially to 
the election of City Messenger. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 13- If it is the intention of 
the gentleman to include only the election of City 
Messenger, I have no objection ; but my objection 
was to going into an election of all the officers. I 
withdraw my objection to the motion. 

The rule was suspended and an election ordered. 

Committee— Messrs. Hiscock of Ward 21, Brint- 
nall of Ward 5, Barnard of Ward 21. They re- 
ported that sixty-eight votes were cast, all of 
which were for Alvah H. Peters. Mr. Peters was 
declared elected in concurrence. 

Superintendent of Public Buildings. A report 
came down nominating James C. Tucker as 
Superintendent of Public Buildings. Accepted in 
concurrence. 

Mr. Wilbur of Ward 20 moved a suspension of 
the rule, that the Council might proceed to an 
election. 

Mr. Blanchard of Ward 21—1 move that this 
nomination lie upon the table, as the Committee 
on Retrenchment are not ready to report, but will 
be within ten days from this time, and I think it 
is essential that the City Council should hear their 
report before acting on these nominations. 

Mr. Stone of Ward 3—1 presume that whatever 
may be the report of this committee we have got 
to have these officers, and I presume that they 
will accept the positions even if their salaries are 
reduced. I hope we shall proceed to clear our 
desks of these ballots tonight. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 13 — There is no hurry for the 
election of these officers. The ordinance provides 
that we can elect them within sixty days. There 
is no hurry, and it is due to the Committee on Re- 
trenchment and Salaries that their report should 
be first submitted before action is taken on these 
nominations. There may be gome departments 
thit can be done away with, and some that can be 
consolidated, and until they report I think it is 
unjust to them to take action. 



Mr. Vose of Ward 24—1 fully concur with the 
gentlemen on the other side who have spoken, 
and sincerely trust that action will not be taken 
tonight on the election of- these officers. This 
committee are at work upon an arduous duty; I 
think there is no mistake about that, and I think 
that any gentleman of this Council will say so. 
We want to give the thing a fair trial and have 
our report submitted, and the members of the 
Council can then adopt it or not. I trust that no 
action will be taken in this matter until they re- 
port. 

The motion to suspend the rule was lost. 

Other Elections. Under the head of unfinished 
business were the following nominations : Asses- 
sors—Thomas Hills, Benjamin Cushing, Benjamin 
F. Palmer, Edward F. Robinson and Joshua S. 
Duncklee; Superintendent of Streets— Charles 
Harris; City Engineer— Joseph P. Davis; Super- 
intendent of Public Lands— Robert W. Hall ; Su- 
perintendent of Sewers— William H. Bradley; 
City Solicitor— John P. Healy; Clerk of Commit- 
tees—William H. Lee; Superintendent of Com- 
mon—John G alvin ; Water Registrar— William IT. 
Davis; City Surveyor— Thomas W. Davis. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 13 — As these elections are in 
order under unfinished business, I move that the 
nominations be laid upon the table. 

Mr.Wilburof Ward20— Ihope thatmotion will not 
prevail. I cannot see what effect the report of this 
committee is going to have on the election of these 
officers. I don't know but they are going to abol- 
ish the City Government entirely. It seems to me 
that they have been through the regular form and 
have been nominated by regular committees 
and they are in order for an election tonight. I 
hope we shall go into an election and elect tnem. 

The nominations were laid upon the table. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Order lor the Committee on Improved Sewerage 
to have charge of all matters relating to the sub- 
ject, and to employ assistance, as therein set forth. 
Passed in concurrence. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Petitions of Matthew Foley, for compensation 
for injuries received by alleged defect in a street ; 
of W. H. Farley, to be paid for injuries to his 
horse and sleigh on Columbus avenue. Severally 
referred to the Joint Committee on Claims. 

By Mr. Howes of Ward 18— Petition of Robert 
Paget, tor leave to place boats on the Public Gar- 
den pond. Referred to the Joint Committee on 
Common and Public Grounds. 

By Mr. Eraser of Ward 6— Petition of John G. 
Albee, for compensation for injuries received by 
defect in East Boston ferries. Referred to Joint 
Committee on Claims. 

By Mr. Brown of Ward 23— Petition of W. O. 
Henshaw et al., citizens of Ward 23, representing 
the necessity for a branch of the Public Library 
in AVest Roxbury, and requesting an appropria- 
tion therefor. Referred to the Joint Committee 
on Public Library. 

Severally sent up. 

PRACTICE OF MEDICINE AND PHARMACY. 

Mr. Ruffin of Ward 9 submitted the following : 
City of Boston, ) 

In Common Councjl, Feb. 8, 1877. ] 

The Joint Standing Committee on Legislative 
Matters to whom was referred the subject of pe- 
titioning the Legislature for the passage of an act 
regulating the practice of medicine and pharmacy, 
having considered the subject, beg leave to sub- 
mit the following report: 

At the present time there appears to be no law 
bearing upon the subject. In this city any per- 
son, whether qualified or not, can practise medi- 
cine or pharmacy without restriction, and the 
health and lives of our citizens are exposed to 
danger from the ignorance of unqualified prac- 
titioners. It is estimated that at least one-third 
of the persons in this city calling themselves 
"physicians" have never studied medicine, and it 
is well known that many persons engaged in sell- 
ing medicines are not trained pharmacists. 

The necessity of careful study and training in 
both these professions is undeniable. Upon the 
skill of the physician in prescribing the proper 
remedies and of the pharmacist in compounding 
them oftentimes depends the life of the patient. 
A mistake on the part of either would, in many 
cases, be irretrievable. Yet it is well known that 
persons who are not only unskilled, but absolutely 
ignorant, of the science of medicine are engaged 
in treating disease, and that the deadliest dinigs 
are handled and sold every day by inexperienced 



FEBRUARY 8, 1877 



59 



persons. It is also a fact that the title of physi- 
cian is often assumed as a cloak for the practice 
of one of the most heinous crimes against hu- 
manity. 

The evil is a growing one, and appears to l>e a 
legitimate subject tor municipal regulation. 

The protection of the public health has been 
recognized as a matter of paramount importance. 
For that purpose the City Government is charged 
with the execution of stringent laws. It can pro- 
hibit the sale of articles deleterious to the public 
health, and can prevent or remove causes of sick- 
ness. It has been aecided that it is not only the 
right, but the duty of the City Government, so far 
as it may be able, to remove any nuisance which 
may endanger the health of the citizens. The 
most summary processes of law may be invoked 
in order to enforce the statutes and ordinances re- 
lating to the public health. It is believed that ad- 
ditional protection will be afforded by including 
the practice of medicine and pharmacy among the 
matters which now pertain to the public health, 
and, as such, to subject it to proper regulations. 
Unquestionably an unqualified physician or phar- 
macist may do the community great harm, and, 
as a matter of public safety, it would seem desir- 
able that both professions should be practised un- 
der such restrictions as will protect the public 
against danger, imposition and fraud. 

Your committee would, therefore, respectfully 
recommend the passage of the following order. 
George L. Ruffik, 
For the committee. 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be request- 
ed to petition the General Court, at its present 
session, for the passage of an act authorizing the 
city of Boston to regulate by ordinance the prac- 
tice of medicine and pharmacy in this city. 

Order read twice and passed. Sent up. 

PAY OF LABOEEBS ON THE STREETS. 

Mr. McDonald of Ward 12 offered an order— That 
aU laboring men employed on the streets by the 
Superintendent of Streets during the month of 
January, and throughout the year, be paid the 
sum of $1.75 a day. 

The question was put on sending the order up, 
and was declared lost. Mr. McDonald doubted 
the vote, and on motion of Mr. O'Donnell of Ward 
7 the yeas and nays were ordered. 

Mr. McGaragle'of Ward 8 — What authority have 
we in this matter, and what effect will the order 
have if we pass it? It is a very important ques- 
tion. 

The President— The question is on sending the 
order up to the Board of Aldermen. 

Mr. McGaragle— I supposed that to be the 
proper course. I supposed the Council had no au- 
thority to act in the matter. 

Mr. Howes of Ward 18 — Is the order properly 
worded? Will such an order, if passed, beany 
more than a petition to the Board of Alderman ? 

The President— In the opinion of the Chair, the 
Council has no jurisdiction over this matter. It 
should really.be in the shape of a petition. 

Mr. Flynn of AVard 13— It seems to me that if 
the gentleman really wants to have that order 
adopted it should come in the form of a resolve, 
and not come in here in the form of an order, be- 
cause we really have nothing to do with it, as the 
Board of Aldermen have charge of the expendi- 
ture of money and the fixing of the wages of the 
laborers in that department. The order should 
really have come in here in the form of a resolve, 
and if the gentleman will so change it I shall have 
no objection to voting for it. 

Mr. McDonald accep.ted the suggestion and 
amended the order so that it should read— Re- 
solved, That in the opinion of the Common Coun- 
cil the pay of the laborers should be, etc. " 

Mr. Blodgett of Ward 8—1 move to further 
amend by striking out the words "and throughout 
the year." 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17—1 rise to a point of or- 
der. As the question is on solving the doubt, is 
the resolve properly before us ? 

The President— The yeas and nays have been or- 
dered on solving the doubt. 

Mr. Howes of Ward 18—1 rise to a point of or- 
der. The order having been amended after the 
yeas and nays had been ordered, and the question 
being upon solving the doubt, the order could not 
be amended after the yeas and nays were .ordeied. 

The President — It was done by general consent, 
aiid the order was simply am'entled to make it 
readable. 

Mr. Ruffinof AVard 9—1 should like to inquire if 
this is a debatable stage ? If the resolve is open 
to discussion ? 



The President— The question is not open for dis- 
cussion. The question is on solving the doubt by 
yeas and nays. 

The roll was called, and the Council refused to 
send the order up — yeas 32, nays 36. 

Yeas — Messrs. Barry, Brintnall, Burke, Cannon, 
Cox, Dee, Doherty, DugG:an,Fagan, Fernald, D. A. 
Flynn, J. J. Flynn, ITraser, Ham, Jackson, Kel- 
lej (Ward 3), Kelley (Ward 6) Kidney, Loughlin, 
McClusky, McDonald, McGaragle, Morrill, Nu- 
gent, O'Connor, O'Donnell, Pope, Reed, Roach, 
Sibley, Souther, Spenceley,E. R. Webster— 33. 

Nays— Messrs. Barnard, Beeching, Blanchard, 
Blodgett, Brown, Clarke, Coe, Crocker, Danforth, 
Day,Felt,Hibbard, Hiscock, Howes, Morrill, Mow- 
ry. Pearl, Perham,0. H. Pierce, Pratt, J.B. Richard- 
son, M. W. Richardson, Roberts, Ruffln, Sampson, 
Shepard, Smardon, Stone, Thompson, Thorndike, 
Upham, Vose, Warren, G. B.Webster, Wilbur, Wol- 
cott— 36. 

Absent or r>ot voting — Messrs. Cross, MuUane, 
J. H. Pierce— 3. 

When the name of Mr. Stone of Ward 3 was 
called, he rose and called for the reading of the 
resolve, which the President did, and then Mr. 
Stone said, "The amendment was put in after the 
yeas and nays were called for, and 1 should think 
it was not in order. I vote No." 

POSSESSION OF ESTATES SOLD FOR ASSESSMENTS. 

Mr. stone of Ward 3 submitted a report from 
the Joint Standing Committee on the Treasury 
Department, representing that they are informed 
by the City Collector that the city has become the 
purchaser of numerous estates which have been 
sold from time to time for non-payment of assess- 
ments lawfully levied upon them. The city became 
the purchaser of these estates in part under the 
law providing that if the deed be not taken by the 
bidder in ten days from the day of sale, the estate 
shall be conveyed to the city, and in other cases 
under the law providing that if no bidders appear 
the sale shall be postponed from day to day for a 
time not exceeding seven days, and then if there is 
no bid for the estate the city shall become the 
purchaser. The committee are of opinion that 
the city should formally take possession of this 
property in order that it may have the benefit of 
any income which might be derived from the es- 
tates, and also that they may be sold in any cases 
where it may be deemed best for the city's inter- 
ests. The committee recommend the passage of 
an order — That the Committee on Public Lands be 
authorized to take possession of the estates named 
in the accompanying schedule, said estates having 
been sold for unpaid assessments and of which 
the city has become the purchaser, and said com- 
mittee is hereby invested with the same power in 
relation thereto that they now have in other mat- 
ters. 

Sale of August 29, 1873, for unpaid taxes of 
1872, the estates being held under the tax titles for 
all unpaid taxes of intervening years. The list 
shows the names of the parties to whom assessed, 
and the consideration named in the deeds. 

John M. Byron, No. 52 Kendall street ^63. 37 

Jesse F. Barker, No. 88 Monroe street 107.43 

Jesse F. Barker, No. 88 Monroe street 51.20 

Benjamin B. Newhall, No. 43 Sterling street. 103.18 
Chesver Newhall, 2d, Lot 38, Newhall's plan 

of Sumner estate 10.34: 

Cheever Newhall, 2d, Lot 39, Newhall's plan 

of Sumner estate. .■ 10.33 

Cheever Newhall, 2d, Lot 40, Newhall's plan 

of Sumner estate 12.24 

Charles Newhall, Harvard street 24.58 

Charles Newhall, Lot 27 Wales street 24.58 

Charles Newhall, Lot 57 Bailey street 10,87 

Charles Newhall, Lot 86 Bailey street 12 12 

Maria B. Newhall, marsh land near Walnut st. 13.52 

Maria B. Newhall, land on Adams street 17.28 

Maria B. Newhall, land on Ashmont street. 

Lot 21 13.52 

Maria B. Newhall, Lot 33, Tolman's plan of 

Newhall estate : 9.67 

Maria B. Newhall, Lot 34, Tolman's plan of 

Newhall estate 9.67 

Maria B. Newhall, Lot 35, Tolman's plan of 

Newhall estate 8.43 

Maria B. Newhall, Lot 36, Tolman's plan of 

Newhall estate 8.43 

Maria B. Newhall, Lot 37, Tolman's plan of 

Newhall estate 8.43 

Maria B. Newhall, Lot 38, Tolman's plan of 

Newhall estate.... 8.43 

Maria 3<. Newhall, Lot 39, Tolman's plan of 

Newhall estate 8.43 

Maria B. Newhall, Lot 40, Tolman's plan of 

Newhall estate 8.43 

Maria B. Newhall, land west side of Nepon- 

setavenue 9.71 

Maria B. Newhall, Lot 46 Neponset aveiuie... 10.94 
Maria B. Newhall, Lot 45 (rear) Neponset ave. 9.71 



60 



COMMON COUNCTX. 



Maria B. Newhall, Lot 44 (rear) Nepouset ave. 9 71 

Maria B. Newhall, Lot 43 (rear) Nepouset ave. 8.43 

Maria B. Newhall, Lot 42 (rear) Nepouset ave. 9.71 

Manuel Silva, Lot 6 fuller street 17.08 

Sale of August 28, 1874, for unyaiil taxes of 1873, 
the estates being held under the tax titles for all 
unpaid taxes of intervening years. The list shows 
the names of the parties to whom assessed, and 
the consideratian named in the deeds. 

3 James Doherty , 6 Phipps place jiS86.15 

5 Patrick O'Leary heirs, Washington square.. 360.G5 

5 John Welch, 10, 11 Chiekering place 157.75 

C Russell A. Ballou et at, trustees, Brookline 

avenue 1,275.28 

6 George Washington Warren et al. trustees, 

south of Brookline Branch Kailroad 603.36 

7 William Bleakley, 178 Thiril street and 285 

D street 88.97 

7 George H. Johnston, 177 Second street 44.06 

8 James P. Cummings, 140 Hudson street 165.14 

9 Nellie E. Corbett, 7 Favette street 127.92 

9 Ellingwood & McKay, "307 Columbus ave. . . 226.17 

9 John L. Merguire, 271 Columbus avenue 160.51 

9 Henry F. Klce, 7 twenty-foot court, now 

Buckingham place 84.53 

9 Heui-y J. Stevens, 47 Buckingham street... 134.97 
9 Charles A. Wood, Commonwealth avenue.. . 552.73 

11 William H. Aelams, corner East Newton 

and Harrison avenue 73.82 

12 Mary H. T. Bird, 556 Eighth street 65.80 

12 Mary H.T. Bird. G street 45.56 

12 Peter Burns, 5li3 Eighth street 71.67 

12 Seth Eastman, 775 Broadway 109.22 

12 Samuel N. Gaut, 696 Sixth street 71.67 

32 Jenkins tV: Co., Sixth street 100.63 

12 Frank H. Kimball, 610 Seventh street 73.08 

12 Gottleib Scherer, Eighth street 78.97 

13 Henry B. Chamberlain, Renfrew street and 

Harrison avenue 1014.54 

13 Jonas B. Hildreth, Fellows street 147.63 

13 do. Zeigler street 43.17 

13 do. Dudley street 62.94 

14 Charles H. Baker, 1 Bainbridge street 65.90 

14 Herbert E. Barney, 345, 347 Warren street. 74.12 

14 Mary L. Davis, 18"St. James street 99.09 

14 Charles A. Green, 7 Bainbridge 55.73 

14 Sarah F. Hersey, 4 Akron place 45,86 

14 Granville Perry, 1464 Shawmut avenue 86.15 

14 Jeremiah Sheehan, 128 Dale street 52.83 

14 John B. Simpson, lot 25 cor. Sterling street. 56.11 

14 do. lot 26 " " 80.41 

14 do. lot 28 " " 80.41 

15 William Bowe, Marcella street (69,596 feet) 255.71 
15 do. " (34,661 feet) 130.00 

15 Eliza M. Bowe, junction Marcella street 42.48 

15 Michael R. Culbert, Binney street 93.33 

15 Matilda A. Dawson, Marcella street 73.08 

1 5 Lincoln & Allen, Bickford street 77.44 

15 Michael Mcintosh, Hampshire street 119.34 

15 Salome Parker, 1099, 1101 Tremout street 76.03 

15 Patrick H. Rogers, 17 Milford street 98.37 

15 do. lots 48, 50 Ward street.. 36.10 

15 William Somers & Co., Marcella street 74.41 

15 do. do. do 74.41 

15 Charles Ward, Parker street 70.33 

15 Robert F. Wheat, lessee, Rogers avenue 144.92 

16 William H. Boynton, Mill street 121.44 

16 do Commercial street 283.32 

16 Cook, .Jordan & Marsh, Howard avenue 142.11 

16 Charles Greenwood, lot 3, Leonard street. . . 23.80 

16 Ezekiel S. Johnson, Stoughton street 60.15 

16 John McDonald, lot 97, cor. Leonard street. 10.71 
16 Thomas Story, Church street 51.22 

Sale of Nov. 21, 1872, for unpaid sewer assess- 
ments : 

John Muriay heirs, Hampshire street §9.03 

R. F. Wheat, Tremont street 213.36 

S. Eliot Trask, Glen wood street 67.62 

Manuel Silva, Walnut avenue 157.65 

Sale of Dec. 18, 1873, for unpaid sewer assess- 
ments : 

Enoch Bunker, Ottawa street j?125.54 

Frances D. Silva, 27 Laurel street 122.95 

John Sheehan, Eighth street 25.70 

Moses S. Chase, Newman, corner of Lowland 

street 25.20 

.Joseph Breckenridge, Trenton street 116.57 

Thomas McDonald, 12 Longwood avenue... . 42.62 

Sale of Sept. 23, 1874, for unpaid sewer assess- 
ments : 

Robert M.Webb and othtrs, Brookline ave- 
nue, corner Peabody street )J!135.24 

William Jones, Dorchester avenue 61.82 

AVilliam Jones, Dorchester avenue 122.10 

William S. and Thomas Kyle, Fruit - street 

court 34.78 

Patrick Coyne and Daniel Briscoe, Seventh 

street 99.23 

John A. Emerson, Shawmut avenue 33.69 

Charles B. Pratt, Shawmut avenue 31.97 

W. Eliot Woodward, 1136 and 1138 Shawmut 

avenue 56.58 

W. Eliot Woodward, 1144, 1146, lJ48and 

1150 Shawmutavenue 139.29 

.John Mullen, northeast corner Eighth and 

Atlantic streets 110.41 

John Mullen, southeast corner Eighth and 

Atlantic streets 99.36 



John Mullen, southeast corner Eighth and 
Atlantic streets 99.36 

Sale of Jan. 7, 1873, for tinpaid betterment as- 
sessments: 

.John Donahoe, 111 Warrenton street §1,322.90 

Mary E. Homles, Clark street 413.90 

Sale of Dec. 30, 1873, for unpaid betterment a.s- 
sessments: 
Eunice E. Humphrey, 16 Edinboro street $460.60 

Sale of Oct. 7, 1874, for unpaid betterment as- 
sessments: 
George D. Cox, Harrison avenue $563.90 

The order was read twice and put upon its pas- 
sage. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 13— How long has it been 
since these estates were sold? It appears to be a 
pretty arbitrary power to invest this committee 
with at this time. 

Mr. Stone of Ward 3— Some of these estates 
were sold in 1873 and 1874, and I think some were 
sold in 1872. They were sold under Mr. Tracy's 
administration as Treasurer, and the owners of the 
estates have two years to redeem them ; after the 
two years have expired they belong to the city, 
except in cases where a mortgagee has a claim 
upon them, and then within two years after no- 
tice. It will cost the city a great deal of money to 
notify the mortgagees, and the committee came 
to the conclusion that this was the shortest and 
cheapest way of notifying them. There are none 
of these estates hut have been sold for three 
years, and the time for redemption has expired. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 13 — I think it is a pretty 
arbitrary order and should lie over for one week. 

Mr. McGraragle of Ward 8—1 move that It lie 
upon the table and be printed. I should like to 
see what the estates are. 

Mr. Flynn— I accept the suggestion. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 10— I desire to state 
that this matter came up before the Committee 
on Ordinances, and a sub-committee was appoint- 
ed a few weeks ago to see what new ordinance was 
required for the city to avail itself of all the es- 
tates sold for taxes ; and I believe that the com- 
mittee are considering what should be done, with 
the intention of introducing some legislation 
which will establish a uniform rule to apply to 
all cases. I think there should be a uniform 
rule about it, so that the owners may know at 
a certain time what they may do to relieve them- 
selves of the embarrassments that they find them- 
selves in. It is desirable to have uniformity about 
it, and I should hope that this matter may lie over 
until the committee report. I think the commit- 
tee will recommend some provisions that we do 
not now have in regard to that matter. 

Mr. Stone of Ward 3—1 see no reason for any 
new ordinance in regard to this matter. These 
estates are offered for sale every year, either for 
taxes or for betterments. This list includes both. 
A private party buys them and if he gets a title 
from the city he holds it for tw-o years, and 
if the owner refuses to advance him the sum he 
has paid, and ten jier cent, interest, ^then it be- 
comes his unless there is a mortgage, and then he 
has to give the mortgagee notice, and if the mort- 
gagee refuses to pay, then the property becomes 
the purchaser's. The city is in just that position 
in regard to these estates, there having been no 
purchaser at these sales. It is a well-established 
fact in law, and requires no new ordinance. Still, 
I have no objection to laying it upon the table and 
having it printed, because the object of the com- 
mittee was to have it printed. The committee 
think that if the names of • the owners were print- 
ed they would come forward as a matter of 
pride and pay the city. The city is placed 
in peculiar circumstances. They have got 
the estates and have received no taxes 
from them since; and if there is any income from 
that property, I believe the city should receive it. 
Some of it is vacant land and some of it is im- 
proved. 

The report and order were laid upon the table 
and ordered printed. 

WORK FOB POCK CITIZENS. 

Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19 offered an order— That 
the Committee on Paving be authorized to inquire 
into the expediency of spending $5000 in provid- 
ing work for the poor citizens of our city, and 
paying the same f 1 per day. 

Mr. Spenceley— I offer this order as a means of 
giving employment to the poor citizens of our 
wards who have nothing to do. It is a very sad 
fact, as many members of the Council are aware 
from the applications made to them, that there 



FEBRUARY 



1877 



61 



are many poor men in all the wards who are suf- 
fering for the necessities of life. It is among the 
saddest of my duties to listen to the complaints of 
sufferings by these men. The other evening a 
gentleman called at my house— and I call him a 
gentleman because I think none the less of a man 
because he does not wear a broadcloth coat— 
with his wife, and said that he had nothing 
in his house. 1 investigated the" case, and 
found that his statement was true. He was will- 
ing and able to w^rk, and had tried every means 
to get work. "What could I do ? What could I tell 
him? I helped him a little and did what I could. 
While I do not think it is best to let these men 
lean on the city for work in all cases, yet we have 
them in our midst and we must help them in some 
way. I voted for the resolution offered by the 
gentleman from Ward 12 tonight, because our 
laborers are not doing much this winter, and at 
.■jSl.TS a day they will not get enough to carry them 
through the wintei-. I believe $5000 appropriated 
in this way will help many persons in the next 
two months who cannot get help in other ways. 
Therefore I hope we shall pass this orde;* tonight 
and send it up to the Board of Aldermen and give 
some help to the suffering poor citizens of the 
city. 

Mr. Howes of Ward 18—1 approve of the order 
as introduced by the gentleman, but I should like 
to call the attention of the gentleman from Ward 
19 to the fact that in the month of December of 
last year an order somewhat similar was intro- 
duced here asking that the Superintendent of 
Streets supply work for poor men out of employ- 
ment at nominal wages— men who would be de- 
pendent upon the city for charity. It was thought 
better to give them work at nominal wages 
rather than to give them charitable contributions. 
And now, sir, an order comes in two months later 
to give them as high wages as any one else. I 
shall vote for the order cheerfully, but I think it is 
out of place, when they have been receiving work 
as charity to ask to be i)aid full wages. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 13—1 shall vote against the 
order because I don't believe in taking the back 
track. The order asks for men to be employed at 
a dollar a day ; now we have 900 men working at a 
dollar and twenty-five cents a day, and if you pass 
this order it will bring them down to one dollar. 
There is money enough left to employ those men 
two weeks more at a dollar and a quarter a day, 
but this order for !$5000 Avould not last them a 
week. The Paving Department have got money 
enough to keep these men at work for two or 
three weeks longer at a dollar and a quarter a 
day. I think myself that this order is ill-timed 
until something can be shown that these men are 
out of employment. 

Mr. Spenceley — While perhaps the remarks of 
the gentleman may be correct, and these men are 
working at a dollar and a quarter a day, yet it 
seems to me that this work is about over with, the 
streets are almost clear from ice, and I assuredly 
hope we are not going to have many more snow 
storms. He says there are so many at work — why 
I have a list of men who have applied to me for 
work within the past four or live weeks; I 
come down to City Hall and tell the Super- 
intendent that the men are in destitute cir- 
cumstances, and I manage to get on two or 
three a week, and I have no doabt many 
Councilmen have just as many names as I have 
of persons who are out of work. What are these 
men to do? It may be true that the men employ- 
ed are getting a dollar and twenty-five cents a 
day, and I don't wish to cut them down, for I 
would rather put them up some. I think the gen- 
tleman from Ward V.i said he should vote against 
tlie order because it would cut them down to a 
dollar a day. I don't know but that would be 
done, but I think if those men went to work and 
did the same work they ought to have the same 
pay. If you went to work with men receiving a 
dollar and seventy-live cents a day, and did the 
same work, wouid n't you demand the same 
pay? One must be a fool if he would n't. Who 
is to blame — the men who work, or the 
men who set them to work? Now, sir, I 
offer this order to set these poor men to 
work; instead of finding fault, I think the gentle- 
man might have made an amendment andraake 
it twenty thousand dollars. 1 thought five thou- 
sand dollars would help a good many men in the 
next two or three months, and it will. I would 
like to make an amendment to it and call it fif- 
teen thousand dollars; and I will make that 
amendment to the order, if there is no objection. 

Mr. Wilbur of Ward 20— I would like to make 



one more amendment, if in order. And that is, 
that all the poor laboring men now out of employ- 
ment shall be employed at the expense of the city. 
I think that is about as becoming as the order. 
It seems to me that the bringing of these orders 
has got to be a case of buncombe. Speaking of 
the poor classes of men, I have probably as many 
applications coming to me as any gentleman here. 
I have perhaps fifteen or twenty names, and nei- 
ther five nor fifteen thousand dollars will satisfy 
those who are out of employment. I will go as 
far as any one, and I move to amend so that all 
laboring men out of employment shall be em- 
ployed by the city. 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8—1 certainly shall vote 
for the order as amended by the gentleman from 
Ward 19; but I shouldn't have voted for the origi- 
nal order, because $5000 is nothing. It may be 
that some gentlemen here like to jest about it; 
but they have not suffered — they are not poor; 
they are beyound that. Now, sir, there is no 
doubt but $15,000 would help a great many. It 
may be at the sacrifice of those who are employed 
at $1.25 a day; but the honest laborers will rather 
sacrifice something to help their fellow men in 
distress. Half a loaf is better than none. The 
gentleman has offered an amendment that all the 
laborers out of employment be employed by the 
city of Boston. I hope the amendment for $15,000 
will prevail. 

Mr. Spenceley — 1 do not like the remarks of the 
gentleman from Ward 20. He speaks of bun- 
combe. I do not believe in judging others by 
yourself. It seems to me that he has been through 
the mill, and knows something about it. But I do 
know this from the bottom of my heart, that if I 
go to my home and should see my wife and chil- 
dren gathering around me crying for food, I know 
there would be a feeling in rny heart that I would 
want to get something to do— some honest work, 
that would bring the necessaries to my wife and 
children and prevent them from suffering. Bring 
it home to your own hearts if you can. Imag- 
ine yourself, if you can, able and willing to 
work, with a wife and children starving be- 
fore you. Said a man to me the other day, 
I should think you would get tired of this. I 
am not tired of it. I glory in a man's trying to 
get work. I don't care if they keep ringing my 
door bell till midnight. I believe there are many 
who need our help, and I am willing to help the 
poor when they are willing to help themselves. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 13—1 don't particularly ob- 
ject to the amendment making it $15,000, because 
1 am as ready to make it fifty thousand as fifteen 
if the work can be found for these men; but my 
point is, that by introducing this order you reduce 
the pay of the 900 men now employed by 
the city, and put them on at $1 a day. 
There is no work for them ; no teams can be had. 
In the Paving Department the expense is 
$6700 a week for labor, and those men are 
getting a dollar and a quarter a day. If the gen- 
tleman's order goes through they will be reduced 
to one dollar a day. I say the proper way is to 
wait till they get through carting snow, when they 
can be put to work in macadamizing stones, and 
will not throw these nine hundred men out of 
work. Then if the gentleman want* to make it 
fifty or a hundred thousand dollars I would vote 
for it. But I deem it out of place now. 

Mr. Pratt of AVard 21 — The number of unem- 
ployed men and the poverty that prevails this 
winter appeals to the heart of every one of us, I 
suppose; and as I am as su^sceptible to this influ- 
ence as the average Councilman, I am as ready 
to help any man who wants an honest place to 
do honest work as any one on this floor ; but I 
must oppose the order, even as amended, for this 
reason — the matter of help to the poor should 
not come in the way of a gratuity or a piece 
of alms from the city. As it is offered now it 
appears to come as a matter of charity. Now, sir, 
the honest poor who have been spoken of so elo- 
quently by my friend opposite [Mr. Spenceley], 
these honest men do not ask tor charity, but for a 
place to do fair work at fair wages. They do not 
ask to become paupers. The way to meet this 
want, I respectfully suggest, is to ask the Pavins:, 
Street or some other department, where many 
men are employed in the course of the 
year, if there is n't labor to be done, 
something that must be done some time and that 
can be done now, and by doing it now to give 
them employment, at the same time relieving 
them without giving them alms. That would be 
seeking their services in a legitimate way. I sug- 
gest that tliat puts the matter in a foj'm that 



6a 



COMMON COUNCIL 



helps those men who are out of employment, and 
at the same time it saves their integrity and the 
Integrity of the city; and it offers no bonus 
to those who are not citizens to come here for the 
purpose of getting employment. It simply puts 
the honest, industrious citizen who, by the misfor- 
tunes of the times, is thrown out of employment, 
in the position of doing work that the city will 
have to do some time. I hope the order will not 
prevail; but I hope that information will be ob- 
tained so as to give employment to as large a 
number as the order contemplates. 

Mr. Spenceley— The gentleman from Ward 13 
says he is willing to vote for .$15,000 if the work 
could be found. A little while ago he said he 
was willing to go as far as any one, and I make 
the amendment that the wages be $1.25 a day. 

Mr. Wilbur withdrew his amendment. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 13— That is exactly what we 
are doing today— paying them ^1.25 a day. It has 
been said that the order was put in here for bun- 
combe, and I believe it; and I believe it as much 
buncombe as anytliing I have heard here this 
year. I believe it has been put in here for bun- 
combe. We now have 900 men at work for $1.25 a 
day. Now, what can you do? It is all they can 
employ. When that money is expended, then they 
can be employed at other work; they can be put in 
the sheds, at macadamizing stone; but fifteen 
thousand dollars wouldn't amount to anything ; it 
would n't give two weeks' work. It it piit inhere 
to make capital and nothing else. 

Mr. McGaragle— I don't know what it was put 
in for, biit I am in favor of it. The gentleman's 
[Mr. Flynn] arguments against it are the strongest 
for it. If nine hundred men are at work now, 
there are nine hundred more out of work. We 
don't suppose there is any work that is urgent to 
be done right away: but they can get .vork ahead, 
can prepare for spring work by macadamizing; 
and as to teams they can get a thousand. I hope 
the order will prevail. 

Mr. Stone of Ward 3— When I go to the Superin- 
tendent of Streets — as unfortunately I have to do 
occasionally once a week — to get men on, I am 
met with the reply that they have got more men 
at work than they really know what to do with; 
but he generally grants me one or two or three. 
If the Paving Department is doing all that it pos- 
sibly can now in putting men on, I don't see the 
object of passing this order, and I hope it will not 
prevail. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 11— It seems to me that 
the Council is very much inclined to take up mat- 
ters which do not properly belong to them, else I 
don't understand the question rightly. I think 
that all this discussion, that this whole matter, 
does not concern us at all. It concerns the Pav- 
ing Department, and properly should not come 
before us at all for discussion. It is something 
that we have nothing to do with, and I move that 
the order be laid upon the table. 

Mr. Clarke of Ward 22 — If I understand the ob- 
ject of the mover of the order, it is that an addi- 
tional number of men shall be employed than is 
now employed by the city. Well, sir, I know 
something about the necessity for something of 
this kind to be done, for at the present time in 
my ward there is a large number of families that 
have never before come to the city for any work 
whatever, either on the streets or anywhere else. 
There is a large number of factories in my section 
of the city — one an iron fouudery which usually 
employs some four hundred heads of families, 
who are entirely thrown out of work this year ; 
there are also quite a number of factories that 
have stopped or are running on short time; and 
manyjheads of families told me that they have n't 
had any work for the last two or three months. I 
have a list, and I put upon it only those who have 
families ; I had thirty-five names upon my list last 
Saturday, and the Superintendent of Streets gave 
me three men; it was the greatest conun- 
drum to me to tell how to divide up that list of 
thirty-five destitute men with families and place 
only three men upon the work. I have had sev- 
eral extreme cases of destitution in families. They 
don't ask for this work because they are paupers; 
tliey do it because they are willing to render the 
city some consideration for their work. I had a case 
last Monday of a man with eight children who came 
to see me for work, and I told him I had nothing 
for him, and that all I had on Saturday to give out 
in my ward was three. He said he had nothing 
to eat, and no coal. I sent him down to the Provi- 
dent Association to see if he could get some- 
thing from them; he went there and tLey told him 
that they could give nothing in that portion of the 



city, and all that they could bestow in gratuities was 
in the city proper. 1 referred him to a person on 
Dudley street, Roxbury, and he went there, but 
they had no funds. He travelled all clay and 
came back and said he had not succeed- 
ed in getting anything at all. We have 
a very large number of such cases. Of course 
we take their names, but the opportunities for 
doing them any benefit are so small that I am 
really disheartened because I can do nothing 
more. I think these are such extraordinary times 
of embarrassment that the city ought to do some- 
thing to relieve these families. It has never hap- 
pened before since I have been in the City Govern- 
ment, and I hope it will never be so again. I trust 
we shall do something to put them to work. I 
think that ,$1.25 is little enough, for the reason 
that they have nothing to do on stormy days. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 13—1 just want to say one 
word in reply to my friend on my left [Mr. Clarke]. 
It is an old saying, "Consistency, thou art a jew- 
el." A few minutes ago, when my friend [Mr. 
McDonald] introduced an order to pay ;gl.75, mv 
friend [Mr. Clarke] voted nay. 

Mr. Ruffin of Ward 9— In one aspect of this case 
it seems to me it would be rather questionable 
whether we should vote away the city's money in 
the manner indicated in this order. It would ap- 
pear that any relief that we should offer to the 
poor of this city should be done in another way. 
But it seems to me, after hearing the discussion, 
that it would be the highest wisdom and true 
statesmanship to take steps at this time looking 
to the relief of the large number of unemployed 
poor of this city. This is an exceptional 
year, Mr. President. The hard times reach not 
only the poor and utterly destitute, but all other 
classes. People heretofore in a position where 
they could afford some relief and give something 
in the shape of charity to the poor, find them- 
selves, in this exceptional year, unable to do any- 
thing in that direction. This is a hard year ; busi- 
ness is dull; and the depression pervades all 
classes. We have in our midst this very large 
number of poor people who are to be provided 
for. It only comes to this : How will you do it? The 
city of Boston cannot stand here and see people 
starve in our midst. They don't want that report 
to go out from the wealthy city of Boston, where 
there is so much food and clothing stored in the 
warehouses. So you have got to afford some re- 
lief to these people. Now, the question comes up, 
Is this the best way ? I am inclined to think that 
under all the circumstances it is the best thing 
you can do now. It is a thing which ought not 
to be done in general times; it ought 
not to be encouraged. But no one 
can fail to see, there is no one but will admit, that 
something should be done for the temporary re- 
lief of these utterly destitute people. Why, this 
building is crowded every day with people 
anxious for work; with men anxious to 
be doing something. They want work and 
there is none for them; there is noth- 
ing for them to do. If the city can 
find some temporary employment for them, if the 
city can put them to work profitably in any way, 
I think it will be the part of wisdom for the City 
Council to make an appropriation of some liberal 
amount of money which will reach the necessities 
of this class. For those reasons I shall vote for 
the measure, although I think such legislation as a 
general rule would be of a doubtful kind. I think 
it is time to take some step in that direction. 

The motion to lay on the table was declared car- 
ried. Mr. Spenceley doubted the vote, and on 
motion of Mr. McGaragle the yeas and nays were 
ordered. The motion was lost— 17 yeas, 46 nays. 

Yeas— Messrs. Barnard, Coe, Crocker, Felt, J. 
J. Flynn, Hibbard, Howes, Mowry, Pearl, Perham, 
O. H. Pierce, Pratt, M. W. Richardson, Stone, 
Thompson, Wilbur, Wolcott— 17. 

Nays— Messrs. Barry, Beeching, Blanchard, 
Blodgett, Brintnall, Brown, Burke, Cannon, 
Clarke, Cox, Cross, Danf orth, Day, Dee, Doherty, 
Duggan, Fernald, D. A. Flynn, Fraser, Ham, 
Hiscock, Jackson, Kelley (Ward 3), Kelley (Ward 
6), Kidney, Loughlin, McClusky, McDonald, Mc- 
Garagle, Morrill, Nugent, O'Connor, O'Donnell, J. 
B. Richardson, Roach, Roberts, Ruffin, Shepard, 
Sibley, Spenceley, Thorndike, Upham, Vose, War- 
ren, E. R. Webster, G. B. Webster— 46. 

Absent or not voting — Messrs. Fagau, MuUane, 
J. H. Pierce, R. Pope, Reed, Sampson, Smardon, 
Souther— 8. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 9—1 move to substitute 
"$1.00" for ",f 1.25" a day. If we are going to sup- 
ply these men with work for charity it is desirable 



FEBR CJABY 



1877, 



63 



to reduce the amount paid per day so as to em- 
ploy as many as possible for the same money. If 
■we put it at a dollar we can assist a great many 
more men with the same money than we can at 
$1.25. We ought not to make this a means of dis- 
tribiiting charity to special friends of members of 
the Council, but to give assistance to as many 
men as possible. If this is to be done at all, more 
good can be done by paying a small sum thap a 
large one. 

Mr. Spenceley— If the gentleman will notice the 
order he will see we cannot make the price, nor 
the sum of money appropriated. It is for the 
Committee on Paving to inquire into the expedi- 
ency of setting to work an additional number of 
men. We cannot control the price or the number 
of men ; that belongs to the Committee on Paving 
of the Board of Aldermen. The order is only to 
bring to their attention the fact that many poor 
men want to get work. 

Mr. Crocker— Then there seems to be no good 
reason for naming a price at all; but if we name 
anv price we should name $1 rather than $1.25. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 13— It is coming just where I 
said it would. Pass this order, and those men 
now employed will be reduced to $1 a day. That 
will be the effect it will have. 

Mr. Ruffin— I am inclined to think that this 
amendment of the gentleman from Ward 9 is a 
wise move. I think, as he has suggested, that it 
would be better, because it will go farther. Now, 
I don't know what would be the effect upon those 
persons who are now employed by the city. I un- 
derstand that the city makes a discrimination 
now in the money paid to the laborers. Some get 
higher wages than others. That is a matter of 
regulation among the departments. But this is 
a special measure for a special purpose, and I am 
inclined to think that the heads of departments 
would not be governed by the same rules that ap- 
ply to the old regular employes of the city, as they 
would in the distribution of this money. There- 
fore I hope the order will be amended to reatt one 
dollar. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 16—1 move to amend the 
amendment by striking out the sum, so that it 
will be left to the Committee on Paving to flx the 
amount of pay. 

Mr. Jackson of Ward 16—1 hope nothing further 
will be done in the way of amendment. It we vote 
anything in the premises we ought to pass the 
order as it stands. If we can employ any number 
of men to advantage, I don't see any reason why 
we should not pay $1.25 at least, for that is little 
enough. I would like to ask the gentleman who 
suggests that it be made a dollar a day, how»he 
would like to be reduced to $1 a day, if he had a 
wife and children to provide for. Reduce it to a 
dollar a day, and you might as well say it is mere 
charity. If they are worth anything, they are 
worth $1.25 a day. I was about to say that I 
think great injustice was done to men who were 
set to work, a few weeks ago, by re- 
ducing them. I see no good reason 
why the Superintendent of Streets should 
reduce those poor men to $1.25 a day, ana give 
these men who have been at work the year in and 
out $1.75 a day,— some of them owning two 
or three houses, to my knowledge. If real 
justice was done, they should have re- 
duced the old employes first and given 
the new men the full measure of justice 
that they ought to have given them. I have had 
the good fortune to procure work for some four or 
five men at $1.25 at day, but after a few days they 
were discharged; while the men they worked 
alongside of received $1.75 a day. Ilsay it is not just, 
and I say further it is an act of injustice, and the 
least we might do, if we do anything, is to pass 
the order as it now reads. I hope that every gen- 
tleman who believes in justice will vote for the 
order as it now reads. 

On motion of Mr. Eraser of Ward 6 the main 
question was ordered. 

The amendment of Mr. Flynn of Ward 16 was 
lost. Mr. Crocker's amendment was lost— 21 for 
36 against. 

The order was read a second time and passed. 

•CANDIDATES FOK CITY OFFICES. 

Mr. Brintnall of Ward 5 offered an order— That 
the chairman of each nominating committee ap- 
pointed by the President of the Common Council 
report to the Council the names of all applicants 
for head of department for which his committee 
was appointed to nominate, with the petition or 
recommendations accompanying the same, or any 



other information in regard to said applicants; 
said information to be furnished at the next regu- 
lar meeting of the Council. 

Mr. Beeching of Ward 1 — Before being called up- 
on to vote I should like to know the reasons for 
that order. It seems to be a new feature. 

Mr. Brintnall— In noticing the ballots on my 
desk, there are a great many names for each one 
of these positions. So far as I am conaerned- 
and I presume it is so with others— I know noth- 
ing about them, and I offer this order partly to as- 
certain the whys and wherefores, and qualities 
and qualifications of these different parties for 
these different positions; and besides that my 
first object was particularly this : There seems to be 
considerable feeling about a good many of these 
nominations that have been made, that the pres- 
ent incumbents have held the positions for fifteen 
or twenty years in many instances, and a great 
many think it is time for a change. Therefore I 
would like to have the committees hand in the 
names of the other applicants so that the Council 
might judge of the qualifications of those men. 

Mr. iJeechiug- It seems to me to be unnecessary 
to go to all that trouble to bring in a list of names 
of all applicants and petitions for these various 
positions. If the committees that are appointed 
are men of common sense, it seems to me they are 
capable of making suitable nominations; but if 
the nominations are not suitable to the Council, 
when the report is made and an election takes 
place the Council, can elect someone else. It seems 
to me that if it is known publicly that all these 
names are to be presented, the committee will be 
deluged with petitions and requests, and it seems to 
me that the order is entirely unnecessary. If there 
are heads of departments who have been there so 
long that they ought to be removed, that can be 
done by the election without going through the 
formality of presenting the names of applicants 
to the Council. I hope the order will not prevail. 

The order was refused a second reading. 

VACATIONS FOB FIREMEN. 

Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19 offered a resolve— That 
in the opinion of the City Council it is expedient 
that the members of the Boston Fire Depart«ient 
should be allowed an annual vacation, wii^hout 
loss of pay, in addition to that already allowed, 
providing it can be done without detriment to the 
public service. 

Mr. Spenceley moved its reference to the Joint 
Committee on Fire Department. Declared car- 
ried. Mr. Webster of Ward 3 doubted the vote, 
and on motion of Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8 the 
yeas and nays were ordered. The order was re- 
ferred—yeas 43, nays 16 : 

Yeas — Messrs. Barnard, Barry, Beeching, Blan- 
chard, Blodgett, Brintnall, Brown, Burke, Cannon, 
Clarke, Cross, Dee, Doherty, Duggan, Fagan, 
Fernald, D. A. Flynn, Fraser, Ham, Hib- 
ba.rd, Hiscock, Jackson, Kelley, John (Ward 3), 
Kelley, John (Ward 6), Kidney, Loughlin, Mc- 
Clusky, McDonald, McGaragle, Morrill, Nugent 
O'Donnell, Perham, Roberts, Sibley, Souther, 
Spenceley, Stone, Thorndike, Upham, Vose, War- 
ren, Wilbur— 13. 

Nays — Messrs. Crocker, Danforth, Felt, J. J 
Flynn, Mowry, O. H. Pierce, Pratt, J. B. Richard- 
son, M. W. Richardson, Ruffin, Shepard, Smar- 
don, Thompson, G. B. Webster, Wolcott— 16. 

Absent or not voting— Messrs. Coe, Cox, Day, 
Howes, Mullane, O'Connor, Pearl, J. H. Pierce, R. 
Pope, Reed, Roach, Sampson, E. R. Webster— 13. 

BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS. 

Mr. Clarke of Ward 22 offered an order— That his 
Honor the Mayor be requested to petition the Gen- 
eral Court at its present session for the passage of 
an act authorizing the City Council from time to 
time to create any board of commissioners for the 
transaction of any municipal business, and give to 
the same any powers now vested in said Council, 
or in either branch thereof, whether in conjunc- 
tion with the Mayor or otherwise, or by vote pass 
ed by a majority of the whole or each branch 
thereof, to take from any board so created, or 
from any board now existing, any of its powers, 
or by such vote to abolish any or all such boards ; 
the salaries of all such commissioners, when once 
fixed, to remained unchanged, unless altered by 
such votes. 

Mr. Clarke said this was an important matter, 
and it was necessary to be passed upon before the 
first of March. On his motion, it was specially as- 
signed to next Thursday evening at eight o'clock. 

Adjourned, on motion of Mr. Pierce of Ward 18. 



BOARD OF ALDERMKN. 



64 



CITY OF BOSTON. 

Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 

FEBRUARY 13, 1877. 



Regular meeting at four o'clock P. M., his Honor 
the Mayor presiding. 

EXECUTIVE APPOINTMENTS. 

Police Oflficers without pay —George S. Dem- 
brack, Branch Chapel and the vicinity; James A. 
Cropley, at "Dare to Do Right Reform Club," Me- 
ridian street, East Boston; Charles L. Flint, Old 
South Meeting House. 

Severally confirmed. 

PETITIO>'S REFERRED. 

To the Comtnittee on Police. Thomas Dixon, to 
be allowed to project a lantern at 15 Brattle square 
for the purpose of a sign. 

To the Committee on Armories. Officers of the 
First Brigade, for an appropriation for rent of 
brigade headquarters ; Company A, Ninth Battal- 
ion of Infantry, for furniture and repairs on their 
armory, corner of Lowell and Causeway streets. 

To the Joint Committee on Public Lands. John 
B. Regan, for leave to surrender two estates on 
Castle street purchased of the city, and for trans- 
fer of payments made to the credit of an estate on 
Middlesex street; also for extension of time of 
payment for an estate on Indiana place. Com- 
munication from Joseph H. Hunneman et al. 
making a proposition as to price to be paid by the 
city for a surrendered estate on the Northampton- 
street district. 

To the Committee on Lamps. Eliza Carter et 
al., that lamps be placed and lighted in Carter 
place, Ward 6; I. Bartlett Patten et al., for a 
street lamp on Autumn street, corner Longwood 
avenue, Ward 23, with street sign on the same ; 
John H. Millett, for a street lamp in Knower 
place, Ward 21 ; Levi L. Willcutt et al., for street 
lamps on March avenue. West Roxbury; Otis 
Drury, trustee, for a lamp in French square, 
South Boston. 

To the Committee on Paving. David Richards, 
for leave to move a wooden building from Monu- 
ment street, Ward 3, to Medf ord street, Ward 3 ; 
Rufus Estabrook, to adjust his claim for damages 
by the raising and grading of Swett street; 
George P. Kettell et al., that Main street, Charles- 
town, be paved with granite blocks; Henry N. 
Clark et al., that Brookline avenue, from Francis 
street to Brookline, be raised and graded ; also for 
a plank walk on one side of said street. 

To the Committee on Claims. Albert E. Towle, 
for compensation for personal injuries received by 
reason of an alleged defect ' in Allen street ; 
Michael Shea to be paid for personal injuries sus- 
tained in E street ; Cyrus K. Kelley, for damages 
for personal injuries by reason of falling on an icy 
sidewalk on Hanson street, Dec. 11, 1876. 

To the Joint Committee on Assessors' Depart- 
ment. Corporation of "Beth Eil" for abatement 
of tax upon their church edifice in Gloucester 
place. 

To the Committee on Health on the part of the 
Board. Petitions for leave to occupy stubles by 
S. & R. J. Lombard, new wooden, four horses, 
corner Canal street and Frothingham avenue ; F. 
O. Osgood, new wooden, four horses. Cedar street, 
Ward 21; George J. Stevens, old wooden, six 
horses, Medford street. Ward 3; Norman Y. Brint- 
nall, new wooden, 12 horses, 2 Main-street court, 
Ward 5; J. McNelly, old wooden, one horse. 
Downer street, near Tremont street. 

To the Committee on Streets on the part of the 
Board. Philip Sowdon, Jr., to be paid for land 
taken to lay out Jenkins street. 

PAPERS FROM THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Petitions were referred in concurrence. 

Report of Board of Fire Commissioners of the 
number and character of the alarms of fire in 
January last. Placed on file. 

Report and order for Mayor to petition the 
Legislature for an act to authorize the city of Bos- 
ton to regulate the practice of medicine and 
pharmacy in this city. Order passed in concur- 
rence. 

A resolve that it is expedient for the firemen of 
this city to have an annual vacation without loss 
of pay came up referred to the Committee on the 
Fire Department. Concurred. 



QUARTERLY REPORT. 

City Clerk. Received and paid to Collector, 
$1048.74. Sent down. 

BONDS APPROVED. 

The bonds of three constables, being presented 
duly certified, were approved. 

REPORT OF LICENSE COMMISSIONERS. 

The report of the doingsof the License Commis- 
sioners from May 1, 1876, to Feb. 1, 1877, was sub- 
mitted (City Doc. 18). Sent down. 
Total number of applications received from 

May 1, 1876, to Jan. 31, 1877, inclusive, was. . 2,403 
Licenses Granted. 
To sell liquors to be drunk on the premises, 1st 

class, Innholders 16 

To sell liquors to be drunk on the premises, 1st 

class, victuallers 419 

To sell liquors to be drunk on the premises, 2d 

class, victuallers 65 

To sell lig^uors to be drunk on the premises, 3d 

class, victuallers 190 

To sell liquors not to be drunk on the premises, 

4th class, disrillers 3 

To sell liquors not to be drunk on the premises 

4th class, druggists 122 

To sell liquor, not to be drunk on the premises, 

4th class, grocers 203 

To sell liquors not to be drunk on the premises 

4th class, dealers 130 

To sell liquors not to be drunk on the premises, 

5th class, brewers 14 

To sell liquors, not to be drunk on the premises, 

5th clas.« , grocers and dealers 224 

Total number of licenses granted 1,386 



Licenses Issued. 
To sail liquois to bejdrunk on the premises, 1st 

class, Innholders 

To sell liquors to be drunk on the premises, 1st 

class, victuallers 

To sell liquors to be drunk on. the premises, 2d 

class, victuallers 

To sell liquors to be drunk on the premises, 3d 

class, victuallers 

To sell liquors not to be drunk on the premises, 

4th class, distillers 

To sell liquors not to be drunk on the premises, 

4th class, druggists 

To sell liquors not to be drunk on the premises, 

4th class , grocers 

To sell liquors not to be drunk on the premises, 

4tli class, dealers 

To sell liquors not to be drunk on the premises, 

5th class, brewers 

To sell liquors not to be drunk on the premises, 

5th class , grocers and dealers 



16 
396 

60 
173 
3 
114 
198 
128 

14 
211 



Total number of licenses issued 1,313 

Licenses uncalled for, and cancelled 73 



Licenses Declared to be Forfeited. 

1st class, victuallers 

2d " " 

3d " " 

4th 
4th 
5th 



grocers, 
dealers. 



Licenses given up and cancelled, or exchanged 

for other classes 

Applications rejected 

Recapitulation. 

Total number of applications 

Total number licenses granted 1,386 

Total number applications rejected 1,017 



Licenses issued 

Licenses declared to be forfeited 155 

Licenses surrendered and cancelled, or 
exchanged for other classes 17 



Leaving the total number of licenses in actual 
force, Feb. 1, 1877 

Total number of places licensed, of which 86 
have two licenses of different classes, is 



1,386 



51 
5 
42 
17 
17 
23 

155 



17 
1,017 

2,403 



2,403 
1,313 



172 



1,141 



1,055 



The board commenced the hearing; of complaints 
for violation of licenses about the first of Septem- 
ber, 1876, and have beard 202 cases of this kind, 
and declared 155 of them forfeited as above. They 
have also, in cases where circumstances warrantea 
or required it, personally examined the premises 
of applicants for licenses, and into the nature of 
their business. 

Continuous experience of the law under which 
they act confirms the views expressed by the com- 
missioners in their report, made something over a 
year ago. 



65 



BOAKD OF AXjDERMEN 



The law cannot be called a success, though some 
good has undoubtedly been accomplishea by it, 
and it is a step in the right uirection. 

The Chief of Police, in his last report, shows a 
gratifying reouction in the number of arrests for 
drunkenness and Of the places where liquor is 
openly sold. Rejoi.'ing in this fact, it may be 
questionable how much ot the result is due to the 
law and how much to the general depression in 
trade and the so-called hard times from which all 
are more or less suffering. 

The law is in no proper sense a license law, and 
its failure shotild not be deemed the failure of a 
system of license. It is viewed as partial, arbi- 
trary, and unfair in its conditions and require- 
ments, and the commissioners so far sympathized 
with these views that they spent some time last 
winter in preparing a law which they regarded as 
more liberal, and at the same time more stringent 
in its most important conditions, which law was 
passed by the Legislature, but failed to receive 
the approval of the Governor. 

It must be admitted that the business of liquor- 
selling in the city is, to a very large extent, in the 
hands of irresponsible men and women, whose 
idea of a license law ends with the simple matter 
of paying a certain sum, the amomnt making but 
little difference to them, provided they are left to 
do as they please after the payment. Besides the 
saloons and bar-rooms which 'are open publicly, 
the traffic in small grocery stores, in cellars and 
in dwelling houses, in some parts of the city is 
almost astounding. The Sunday trade is enor- 
mous, and it seems as if there were not hours 
enough in the whole round of twenty-four, 
or days enough in the entire week, to sat- 
isfy the dealers. The commissioners deem 
the three greatest abuses of the traffic to be sales 
of impure liquors, sales on Sunday, and sales at 
late hours. 

Notwithstanding this, they believe that a law 
which shall be more rigid in punishing the 
gross abuses of the traffic, rather than insisting 
upon impracticable conditions under which only 
it can be sold, would be more popular in the com- 
munity, and more easy of enforcement ; and they 
would therefore favor a law granting licenses to 
all persons of respectable character to engage in 
the business, leaving the amount of the business, 
as in all others, to regulate itself; but at the same 
time making the penalties for such abuses as they 
have indicated, swift and sure. Such a law is sus- 
tained fairly in cities whose moral standard is cer- 
tainly no higher than ours, and it would seem that 
no very vigorous public sentiment on the subject 
of temperance is required to uphold it. 

A law like this, having the elements of fairness 
and equal rights in it, could hardly fail to receive 
the assent and cordial support of the dealers, be- 
cause the penalties and conditions would be aimed 
at the abuse of the traffic rather than the traffic 
itself. 

Of course this idea is founded on a belief in a 
license rather than a prohibitory law, and will 
have no influence upon a believer in the latter 
system. 

The commissioners are firm adherents of a li- 
cense law, and believe that such a law is the only 
one that it is possible to enforce. 

The present law appears to have been framed on 
the supposition that no one would iDresume to sell 
liquor without a license. A very mistaken suppo- 
sition. Nothing is more common among the deal- 
ers than the saying that they are better off with- 
out than with a license; and, as a matter of fact, 
few of the whole number of persons holding li- 
censes are, in good, faith, keeping the conditions 
of them; and the enforcement of the law against 
those who sell liquor ivithout licenses seems to 
have but little eftect, either on the parties prose- 
cuted or their neighbors in the trade. This is ow- 
ing, the commissioners think, in large measure, to 
defects wbich render the law powerless to convict 
and punish, and it is hardly possible that any law 
on the subject can ever accomplish much until 
these most radical defects are remedied. 

It is a many-sided and perplexing question, as 
has been shown by twenty years of varied expe- 
rience ; but the commissioners have great faith 
that if those interested will give the revision of 
the law careful thought, the result will be a stat- 
ute worthy of being tested; one which public 
opinion will sustain, and one which will gradually, 
perhaps, but surely, correct the abuse of the traf- 
fic, and thus in a great measure diminish its at- 
tendant crime and misery. 

As to the Board of Commissioners, their duties 
seem to have been misunderstood, and the abuse 



which was intended for the la^ itself has been, 
perhaps naturally enough, poured but upon their 
heads. Their powers, arbitrary in some respects, 
axe yet exceedingly limited inothers. They sim- 
ply have the right to grant and revoke licenses ; 
but, contrary to the general idea, they have no 
official control over unlicensed places. In the 
granting of licenses they have endeavored to be 
as fair and liberal as the spirit of the law would 
allow; and in the revocation of the same they 
have also endeavored to use the large power 
granted by the law, in this respect, with justice 
and discretion. Holding a position somewhat 
odious and unpopular, they have performed their 
duties conscientiously, fearlessly, and without 
favor. They have employed such assistants as 
seemed necessary for doing the work systemat- 
ically and efficiently ; they have kept full records 
of the whole business; they have always been 
accessible at stated times; "they have neglected 
no duty, and have given all the time required, 
either day or night. It has been a source ot much 
regret to the commissioners that when statements 
were to be made regarding the office, information 
should not have been sought from those best 
qualified to give it, and the vague and incorrect 
reports which have from time to time gained 
currency have thus been avoided. 
Respectfully submitted. 

Wm. H. Kent. 

Henbv W. Pickering. 

Jos. A. Lafobme. 

License Commissioners. 

HIGHLAND RAILROAD TRACKS IN COLUMBUS 
AVENUE. 

At 4.15, on motion of Alderman Clark, the Board 
took up the special assignment, viz.. Hearing on 
petitions of the Highland Railway Company for a 
location of tracks in Northampton street and Co- 
lumbus avenue. 

Moody Merrill, president of the Highland Rail- 
way Company, appeared for the petitioners. 

C. A. Richards, president of the Metropolitan 
Railroad, appeared on behalf of that company ag 
a remonstrant. 

Wilmon W. Blackmar appeared on behalf of re- 
monstrants on the avenue. 

George Z. Adams appeared for J. H. Hathorne, 
whose petition to run a line of coaches on the 
avenue is before the Board. 

The case for the petitioners was first heard. 

Mr. Merrill presented a map to each member 
of the Board to give a proper understanding of 
the plan. He explained the plan, and said they 
had made the petition because they desire the lo- 
cation and desire to run cars through the avenue. 
Formerly they petitioned for this location at the 
request of residents on the line, though they did 
not care much for it then; but now they want the 
location. They propose to run a special line of 
four cars an hour on the avenue for the special ac- 
commodation of the people residing there, and 
another fifteen-minute line, making a car every 
seven and a half minutes on the avenue. He pre- 
sented petitions in aid of the company's petition, 
•igned as follows : 

James B. Dunn and seven or eight hundred 
ethers. 

John C. Mullaly and 243 others. 

Katharine B. Skillings and 1135 others, ladies. 

R. B. Leuchars and 25 others. 

r. M. Josselyn and 334 others. 

J. P. Townsend and 520 others. 

Edward J. Jones and 74 others, abutters on 
Northampton street. 

Joseph Murdock and 110 others. 

George F. H. Markoe and 115 others. 

Rev. A. J. Patterson and 1021 others. 

F. H. Haynes and 35 others. 

Mr. Merrill spoke at length in regard to the 
need of more railroad facilities felt by the people 
of the Highlands who desire to go to the avenue and 
the streets crossing it. Nearly all who signed the 
petition from the Highlands are taxpayers and 
citizens; all know what they want, and signed the 
petition because they believe it will be a great ac- 
commodation to their section of the city. He 
explained that there had been no difficulty in 
obtaining signatures to the petitions ; in fact, 
there was great enthusiasm in the Highlands, 
both among ladies and gentlemen, in favor of this 
location. A large part of the names were obtained 
without any effort on the part of the officers of 
the company. If the location is granted, they in- 
tend to put on the handsomest line of cars ever 
seen in this city. Thev believed the better the ac- 
commodations furnished the people, the more 



FEBK-QARY 12, 1877 



t>6 



money will come into the treasuries of the com- 
pany. This had been demonstrated by the expe- 
rience of the Highland road. They had made a 
contract for the cars, subject to the granting of 
the petition. He then called the witnesses for the 
petitioners. 

Alexander Leuchars— Live in Albemarle Hotel ; 
father owns property there and feels it would be 
beneficial to real estate to have cars there ; prefers 
Highland road to Metropolitan because competi- 
tion would be good; circulated the petition; of 300 
residents on the avenue only six tavored the Me- 
tropolitan : of 900 on the side streets only twenty- 
one favored the Metropolitan ; a large majority of 
the opponents of any road favor the Highland. 
Did not begin the canvass until the remonstrance 
had been circulated. Zvlany persons favored a 
road, but would not sign a petition for fear of get- 
ting into a controversy with neighbors. [To Mr. 
Richards]— Make no charge for my services and 
expect no remuneration ; went among the people 
and heard their opinions ; did not go on Saturday 
at suggestion of Mr. Merrill, and his statements 
are on his own personal responsibility. [To Mr, 
Blaekmar]— The Albemarle is two or three min- 
utes' walk to the cars ; did not state that they 
must have some railroad, but if they »wms< have 
one, which would they prefer? [To Mr. Ad- 
ams] — The proposition for a line of coaches 
did not receive much favor; saw probably 
three-fourths of the residents on the avenue ; 
made no list of those opposed to the road; 
have made no estimate of the ability of 
the coaches to do the business ; his father sup- 
ported the petition for coaches before the peti- 
tion for cars was put in. 

Mr. Merrill said he never knew Mr. Leuchars be- 
fore the petition was put in. 

Henry P. Stanwood— Reside at corner of Spring- 
field street and Columbus avenue ; appeared four 
or five years ago against any road there, but now 
think it will be a benefit ; prefer the Highland 
road, because it will give accommodations with 
the Highlands that the Metropolitan cannot give, 
and competition will insure better cars; think a 
majority of the people there prefer the Highland 
road. [To Mr. Richards]— Do not think the Metro- 
politan road would give as good accommodations 
as the Highlands. [To Mr. Blaekmar]— Think it 
takes two minutes to reach the cars; first thought 
the road would drive away the drivers on the ave- 
nue, but do not now think it would; know 
three neig\ibors who oppose any road ; don't think 
the cars from the Highlands would be full before 
reaching the avenue. 

Freeman J. Doe— Reside at 371 Columbus ave- 
nue ; favor a. track there ; prefer the Highland ; 
in my judgment it will benefit the property and 
accommoaate the people; in my judgment the 
residents generally prefer the Highland ; think 
competition has been shown to be specially good 
in horse-railroad management in this city. [To 
Mr. Richards]— Do not use cars much; am not for- 
tunate enough to find an empty car at Berkeley 
street; can generally walk down quicker than I 
can ride. [To Mr. Blaekmar] — Can reach a car in 
five or six minutes to Tremont street; give the 
benefit Of my own judgment. [To Mr. Davis] — 
Should prefer a railroad to a line of coaches. 

Alderman Clark in the chair. 

R. B. Leuchars — It was at his request that his 
son got up the petitions; never knew Mr. Merrill 
before that; the Metropolitan first refused to lay 
the track there because it would not pay ; the 
Metropolitan do not want the location themselves, 
and want no one else to have it. 

Charles Richardson— Reside at Hotel Columbus; 
find it very inconvenient to walk to the cars on 
Tremont and Berkeley streets; a line of cars 
would be acceptable to the people; do not advo- 
cate any particular line, but prefer the Highland 
road, as competition is healthy and beneficial. [To 
Mr. Blaekmar]— Own no property on the avenue; 
occupy a back room, and have not a good view up 
and down the avenue. 

David H. Jacobs— Reside at 530 Columbus ave- 
nue, at the extreme upper end ; think the line 
would be beneficial; prefer the Highland if there 
is to be any; don't know which road a majority of 
the residents prefer. [To Mr. Richards]— Should 
not have had clean Metropolitan cars if we had 
not had the Highland road ; carry both tickets in 
my pocket. [To Mr. Blaekmar]— Really favor a 
horse railroad there now, though formerly op- 
posed it; believe they must have a road, and 
therefore prefer the Highland. 

Uriah H. Coffin— Live at 10 Yarmouth street; 
have always favored a road on the avenue; al- 



ways been a demand for it, since the territory 
west of it was built on ; understood not quite so 
many oppose a road this year as before ; came here 
voluntarily; don't care which road gets the loca- 
tion; want some road there; residents on the 
cross streets are dead in earnest for a road : don't 
want to give an opinion as to the effect of a com- 
peting line ; am satisfied with either. 

Alden Avery — Own the new hotel on the avenue 
and Holyoke street; built the Commonwealth Ho- 
tel; decidedly favor a road there ; little prefer the 
Highland road; like the Metropolitan much bet- 
ter than before Mr. Richards was president; could 
hire several suites in the hotel if they had cars 
there ; it will increase the rent $500 a year, and 
the value more than $5000; some people have 
signed remonstrances because they were persuad- 
ed to do it. [To Mr. Richards]- Do not think the 
cars will be overloaded with the Highlanders, who 
are a decent sort of people; should prefer to have 
the line go through Hammond park, where I 
have several tenements. [To Mr. Blaekmar]— The 
mortgages on my hotel have got three 
years to run ; build hotels to sell and fill them 
withteuants; the Berwick is all the property I 
own on the avenue now. [To Mr. Merrill]— Think 
there would be no trouble about people on the 
avenue getting seats in the cars. 

Freeman M. Josselyn — Reside at 410 Columbus 
avenue; always favored a line of cars there; pre- 
fer the Highland, and with one or two exceptions 
the people there all favor the same road. [To Al- 
derman Fitzgerald]— Should like to see the High- 
land cars there, and competition has great weight 
in his preference. 

Edward P. Brown— Reside on Wellington street ; 
from several years' connection with this subject 
he satisfied himself that the people there pre- 
ferred the horse cars; the only difference was as 
to which company should have the location. Wit- 
ness recalled some statistics in regard to the peti- 
tions presented a year and a half ago, by which 
three-fifths of the valuation on the avenue and a 
very large proportion of the valuation — 
six-ninths of all the real estate from North- 
ampton street to the Providence Railroad — favor 
a road there, and six-sevenths of the people have 
the same feeling. Among his neighbors it was 
common talk that a man of Mr. Richards's shrewd- 
ness would not want a line on the avenue that 
causes a large expense and draws off part of the 
patronage irom the Tremont-street lines, The 
idea of competition entered largely into the 
wishes of thepeople. [To Mr. Richards]— These re- 
marks were intended to be in favor of the High- 
land road, and are not intended as an argument; 
and he was not employed as an attorney by that 
company. 

Mr. Merrill said Mr. Brown had never been em- 
ployed by the Highland road. 

Hiram Ames— Live at 8 Yarmouth street, 150. 
feet from the avenue; desire a road on the avenue 
and have long desired one ; think the time has 
come for a road; prefer the Highland, because it 
will have the two roads so nicely sandwiched in 
that it will insure good accommodations; then the 
cars will stop the fast driving on the 
avenue, which is often dangerous; it is a 
long walk to the cars now, and often 
cannot get a seat then. [To Mr. Black- 
mar]— Can walk to the cars in seven or eight 
minutes; don't pretend to name any accidents 
occurring on the avenue by teams; have, heard of 
accidents on Tremont street by the cars. 

E. P. Brown said the present condition of the 
pavement on the avenue had been discussed; had 
heard that the wooden pavement was not a suc- 
cess, and if the Belgian pavement is to be laid 
there all this pleasure travel will close there and 
every one will rejoice to have the cars. 

Luther Farwell — Have signed every petition for 
a road there ; should not object to the Metropoli- 
tan road, but for personal and pecuniary reasons 
prefers the Highland, as he owns property on 
Hammond park and Northampton street. [To 
Mr. Blaekmar] — Am interested in railroads, and 
am president of the Medford & Charlestown road, 
[To Alderman A^iles] — The Metropolitan road will 
best accommodate the people of East Boston and 
other sections. [To Mr. Merrill] — The issuing of 
transfer checks would be a great convenience. 

Henry T. Spear— Reside at 138 Chandler street; 
think the line on the avenue woulil be most decid- 
edly beneficial; prefer the Highland. 

Mr. Merrill read letters from Francis Hall, Pres- 
ident of the Boston Ice Company ; John Carter, 
President of the Lawrence Paper Company; Rev, 
J. B. Dunn, Rev. J. W. Hamilton, all strongly 



67 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN, 



favoring the location ol' tlie Highland road on the 
avenue. 

Henry C. Hunt— Reside on the avenue: think 
the disadvantages on an avenue without cars are 
greater than the advantages. Twice circulated 
remonstrances, and believe a majority prefer the 
Highland, as it will give a competing line, and be 
a protection to the residents on the avenue; have 
little to complain of in the Metropolitan road 
now, but things are liable to change; do not want 
a track there not used. [To Mr. Blackmar]— Think 
the teams go to the avenue to avoid the cobble- 
stone pavements more than the tracks. 

L. Foster Morse — Have been assessor in the 
Highlands for several years; the people of the 
Highlands require the route on the avenue so as 
to go to the public buildings on the Back Bay and 
to the Providence depot. The people have once 
been under the thumb of the Metropolitan, and 
don't want to be there again. The system of 
checks would be a great convenience. The line 
would be used a great deal to go simply to Tre- 
mont street. People want to locate on the line of 
the Highland road, which keeps the Metropolitan 
better than it used to be. Real estate finds ready 
sale near the line of the Highland road ; last yeat 
140 houses were built on the line, and they are all 
full; don't think land can be bought any cheaper 
on Warren street than four years ago. On the 
Metropolitan lines, on Washington street, where 
there is no competition, the fare is ten cents, while 
to Dorchester, where there is competition, the fare 
is five cents. The Metropolitan have a track on 
Harrison avenue to Dover street, which is not used, 
but it would be a good line if used, as it is the 
shortest route to the burnt district from the 
Highlands. [To Mr. Richards]— Was one of 
the original petitioners for the Highland 
road; attended the meetings, but took no 
active part ; am well satisfied with the 
Highland road. Competition has helped the 
Metropolitan road; the Highland does not need it 
now. The Metropolitan does not accommodate 
the public where there is no competition. 

Franklin Williams, an old resident of the High- 
lands-Think it will be advantageous to the peo- 
ple there; the Highland Company carry out what 
they agree to; many people in the Highlands have 
friends living on or near the avenue ; many ladies 
waltjfor Highland cars when the Metropolitan 
cars are now crowded. It will be an easy means 
of intercommunication between the eastern and 
western sections of the Highlands and the city 
proper. The people there are universally for this 
location by the Highland. [To Mr. Richards]— Am 
aware that the Metropolitan asked for this loca- 
tion in 1872 and 1874 and was refused. [To Mr. 
Blackmar]— The Highland road now runs to Pleas- 
ant street in sight of the Providence depot, but 
the ladies and gentlemen complain that it is a 
long walk. The Northampton-street route brings 
them directly to Chickering station. 

L. F. Morse recalled— In the three Highland 
■wards, 19, 20, 21, think 35,000 or 40,000 people would 
be accommodated. [To Mr. Richards]— They would 
fill all the cars they run if they did not run any 
more than the Metropolitan used to ; but all would 
get seats if the cars are run as the Highland cars 
are. [To Mr. Merrill]— It will be an accommoda- 
tion to all who want to go to the avenue and its 
■vicinity. 

Mr. Merrill explained the system of checking 
used by the Highland road ; by buying a check 
the patron can transfer to a car on any other 
route of the company. 

Hon. Albert Palmer — Came as a witness and not 
to make an argument; am happy to testify to the 
desire of Highland people for direct communica- 
tion with this new and rapidly growing part of 
the city. The increased railroad accommodations 
have buUt up the Highlands more than anything 
else. Warren street seems to be the Mecca to 
which all settlers in Roxbury tend, and this has 
taken place since the Highland road was chartered. 
There is no question that the people desire this lo- 
cation given to the Highland road, for they date 
the era in horse-railroad improvement from the 
granting the Highland charter, and this location 
will keep up the equilibrium of competition and 
make the present accommodations permanent. 
He quoted a speech of Mr. Richards to show that 
the Highland, frugally managed, had prospered 
on the crumbs from the Metropolitan table, and 
spoke of the importance of fostering horse rail- 
roads as a means of building up the material 
■prosperity of the city. The Highlands desire this 
Toad earnestly, so that the competition which has 



given us this era in horse railroads may be con- 
tinued. 

The petitioners here rested their case. 

Mr. Richards spoke on behalf of the remon- 
strance of the Metropolitan road. He had found 
no features presented that were iresh and novel. 
The petition is silent as to the use of the Metro- 
politan tracks in Tremont street, Cornhill, and 
Washington street and Temple place. They do 
not dare to state that they will add any more to 
the number ol cars at the corner of Tremont and 
Boylston streets. He then gave the following sta- 
tistics of the number of cars that would meet at 
the corner of Boylston and Tremont streets: 

Going north, or down Tremont street — South 
Boston 17, Highland 12, Metropolitan 55— total 84, 
that would meet there in one hour. 

Going south, or out Tremont street— Highland 
26. Metropolitan 79. 

Making a total of 189 cars in one hour, that those 
splendid, new palace cars have got to meet at that 
point. The petition is silent on that point. 

The Highland Company runs twelve cars around 
Cornhill by special grant from the Board, and the 
granting of this new petition means giving them 
permission to run as many cars on Tremont street 
as they see tit. 

This would seem to be suflBcient to cause the 
Board to pause. Mr. Richards read from sections 
11 and 12 of the general horse railroad law, to 
show that the Board had full power to prevent the 
increase of cars on the streets beyond what is re- 
quired by public necessity and convenience. The 
Highland road grew out of a grievance which oc- 
curred during a winter of unprecedented snow 
and delay. He recalled the incidents connected 
with the organization of the Highland road, which 
was to give certain residents on certain defined 
limits better accommodations than the Metro- 
politan gave. They know the Metropolitan road 
have good cars and give good accommodations 
now, and there is not one scintilla of evidence that 
they have not. This new company grew out of 
the misfortunes of the Metropolitan. The Presi- 
dent of the Highland knows that the money is 
made on the short routes, and he looks around 
and sees Columbus avenue, which is the life blood 
of the Metropolitan. Nothing has been heard of 
the accommodation of the people on the avenue. 
Are the people on the avenue going to 
give up their fine street to accommodate 
the people of the Highlands? Mr. Rich- 
ards then read extracts from the promises made 
at the first hearing at the Legislature by the High- 
land road, when it was alleged that the Metropoli- 
tan road was not run on Christian principles, and 
it was proposed to do so by the establishment of 
the Highland. He knew that "tracts" were an 
essential element in the dissemination of Christian 
principles, but it seemed as if the Highland road 
wanted to steal the tracks of the Metropolitan to 
carry on their road on Christian principles. The 
Highland folks offered to put in their charter a 
provision that there should be an apron extending 
over the platforms to prevent patrons from 
standing on them. This had never been done. 
They are not doing any better today than the 
much-abused Metropolitan has done iii the four- 
horse time which has prevailed so long this win- 
ter. He protested that the granting of this peti- 
tion would be contrary to all the principles of 
equity between man and man. The Metropolitan 
can do all that is claimed to be necessary, and 
with the addition of but a few extra cars. The 
Board are to judge whether public necessity and 
convenience require it ; and then if it is shown 
that the Metropolitan cannot do the work, give it 
to the other companies, but do not give it to a 
company which seeks to compete with the Metro- 
politan on its own tracks. He left the subject 
with the Board, feeling sure that they would think 
it a wrong to the Metropolitan road to grant this 
petition. 

Mr. Blackmar said he appeared for over 300 
property owners, representing $1,600,000, to pro- 
test against any road on the avenue. They are 
very well satisfied with what accommodations 
they have on the avenue. He presented the views 
of the remonstrants at some length, and then 
called witnesses. 

Colonel W.V. Hutchings — Always drive into the 
city ; take the side streets to avoid the tracks ; al- 
ways go down the avenue. [To Mr. Merrill]— Drive 
little over a half a mile on the aveuue ; want to 
get in town quickly, and find that can be done by 
the avenue ; do not think the new Belgian pave- 
ment has made Washington street a superior 



FKBRUARY 12, 1877 



68 



driveway, on account of the number of cai'S and 
teams there. 

Mr. Merrill read a petition from Arthur Nichols 
and others to the effect that the new Belgian 
pavement on Washington street made that street 
unobjectionaWe for driving, and asking that the 
petition of the Highland road be granted. 

Mr. Hutchings said the petition was presented 
to him and he refused to sign it. 

Godfrey Morse, for the committee in charge of 
the Everett School, objected to the location in 
Northampton street, as it would be very liable to 
accident to the children. The principal of the 
school thought it would be at the risk of a child's 
life every day. He did not object to the road go- 
ing through any other street. [To Mr. Merrill]— 
Think the parentsjof these 750 children would ob- 
ject to the location. 

Mr. Page — Reside at 387 Columbus avenue ; am 
opposed to any road on the avenue ; have good ac- 
commodations now; in riding avoid streets where 
tracks are ; would take $5000 less for his estate if a 
track is laid on the avenue. 

W. H. Learnard, Jr. — Reside on the avenue, and 
have ample accommodations by Tremont street. He 
seconded Mr. Morse's protest against the location 
in Northampton street. The passing of the cars 
in the street is an interruption to a school. 

Frank N. Thayer— Live at 547 Columbus avenue ; 
have all the accommodations we want. Believed 
it would be a great injury to the school to have 
the track laid on Northampton street. A gentle- 
man has refused to buy a house on the avenue 
pending this controversy [To Mr. Merrill]- Think 
horse-railroad tracks have depreciated property 
on streets except where it comes in use for busi- 
ness. 

Mr. Blackmar said they had fifty or sixty gen- 
tlemen present who would offer cumulative testi- 
mony, and he would desist. He had not heard a 
single piece of what may be called evidence in 
favor of cars on the avenue. He called attention 
to the fact that of the six avenues running from 
the city proper to the Highlands all but one have 
horse railroad tracks in them. The argument is 
not lor a crying necessity for cars in the avenue, 
but that the Metropolitan road may, by competi- 
tion, be brought to a higher standard. If this is 
needed, the Board can give the Highland a loca- 
tion on the very tracks of the Metropolitan. The 
residents on the avenue have to go to Tremont 
street to the stores for provisions, etc., as there 
are no stores on the avenue. Many people on the 
avenue have horses and like to drive on a street 
free from tracks. It has been specially so during 
the present winter. What would have been the 
condition of the avenue this winter if 
there had been tracks on it? Mr. Blackmar 
reviewed the evidence to show that the petitions 
for the location did not correctly represent the 
sentiments of the people there, as it had been rep- 
resented to the signers that they must choose be- 
tween the two roads. The Highland wanted the 
avenue as a bridge over which to carry a large 
population from the Highlands to the city proper. 
Columbus avenue has been a cats-paw between 
these two roads for the past few years, and the 
people have been compelled to fight them both. 
And now, shades of the old stage coach ! they are 
threatened with another attack. Mr. Hathorne is 
coming here, hoping to lumber his coaches through 
the avenue. The people there say, "Good heavens ! 
give us a rest." There is not a i)oint on the ave- 
nue but people can reach the cars in five minutes, 
on the average. No one can tell of an accident 
which has occurred by the fast driving on the 
avenue, but there are numerous records of acci- 
dents on Tremont street where the cars run. He 
closed by hoping the Board would give the com- 
panies permanent leave to withdraw fi'om this 
eternal petition to give them an accommodation 
they do not want. 

Mr. Blackmar put in the following remon- 
strances against the granting of the petition: 

Henry M. Prescott et al., remonstrance against 
the location of street railway tracks in Northamp- 
ton street. 

James Hall, Jr., and 184 others against the 
granting of the prayer of the petition of the High- 
land Railway Company for leave to lay a track on 
Columbus avenue. 

Mrs. F. H. Stauwood and 30 or 40 others, A. H. 
Carter and 30 or 40 others, all against the granting 
of the petition. 

Mr. Merrill read a petition from residents on 
Northampton street for the Highland road. Many 
of the remonstrants signed because thev 



thought the Metropolitan road was going through 
there. 

Mr. Merrill then closed the hearing in behalf of 
the petitioners. The only way to put this thing 
permanently out or sight is to grant the petition 
of the Highland road for a location in the avenue. 
The opposition comes from a few at the upper end 
of the avenue who own teams and do not care 
whether their neighbors at the lower end of the 
avenue, who have not teams, are accommodated 
or not. There must be a track laid there some 
time, and the city has got to repave the avenue; 
to grant the petition will save the city $20,000, for 
the company will pave the space between the 
tracks. The petition of the Metropolitan was put 
in more as a remonstrance against the Highland 
petition than anything else. All the Metropolitan 
desire is to have both these petitions refused. 
But the people there are not to be deprived of a 
road; they want one, and if this petition is not 
granted the Board will have to go over the whole 
subject again. When the Highland road was 
chartered they were confined to one location, and 
could not extend to Columbus avenue as the peo- 
ple asked them. The company now have the 
right to locations in any part of the city. They 
have fulfilled the conditions of their charter, in 
spite of all the drawbacks of the horse disease, a 
file and the depression of business. He reviewed 
the incidents at the Legislature pending the 
enactment of the general horse railroad law, and 
said that by the bfil of 1873 the whole matter was 
referred to this Board, who should have power to 
grant the locations. The agreement was made 
that in case one road should obtain a location in 
Columbus avenue the other should use the track, 
and there was a special provision to that effect in 
the act of 1873. There was no petition for a loca- 
tion in 1873, but after the general law was passed 
in 1874 the Metropolitan petitioned not only for 
one on the avenue,3but for one down Shawmut 
avenue, even when they had one aTenue where 
they did not use their tracks. He reviewed the 
provisions of the general law, contending that the 
Highland road had maintained the principles of 
the bill. They had left it to the Board to say 
whether the cars from the avenue should run 
round the circuit, and whether some cars now 
running there should be taken off. The 
tracks on the circuit were laid with the ex- 
press provision that they might be used by 
other companies, and within a year the Supreme 
Court has adjudged that those tracks belong just 
as much to the Highland as the Metropolitan. As 
to business, the Metropolitan are running three 
times the number of cars they were running when 
the Highland was chartered, but their receipts 
have increased every year. In Blue Hill avenue 
and Warren street it was the same ; the Metropoli- 
tan are running more cars than before, and so 
shrewd a manager as Mr. Richards would not run 
so many cars unless they paid. So, too, when the 
people insisted on more accommod-xtions to Dor- 
chester, the Metropolitan, when they found they 
were going to have competition, reduced fares and 
put on more cars; and they are carrying more 
passengers than ever before. This is the result of 
healthy competition ; and it is the right policy. It 
is to carry out this policy that the Highland peti- 
tions and claims the right to a location in Colum- 
bus avenue. The Highland had improved its one 
talent, and had even caused the Metropolitan to 
improve its ten talents.[ The location belongs in jus- 
tice to the Highland. It is an act of injustice to the 
people on the lower part of the avenue, who have 
no teams, to deny them the privilege of horse cars 
when they ask for it. It is a dutv the Board owe 
to those people; and the Metropolitan will suffer 
no detriment by it. The Highland grants the fiee 
use of its tracks to the Metropolitan on Eliot and 
Warren streets, and never will make an objection 
to such use when it will better accommodate the 
people; but they do object to the Metropolitan 
gobbling their whole line. When ten, yea five, 
signers will say they are not accommodated on 
Shawmut avenue, the Highland will not object to 
the Metropolitan going on that avenue. They 
never would see any additional accommodations 
in East Boston until they saw the shadow of the 
Highland road in the distance; and there is room 
for another competing company in both East and 
South Boston, and in nothing is competition so de- 
sirable as in the transportation of freight and pas- 
sengers. A horse-railroad monopoly is the 
most dangerous a community can have. 
The more competition you have the more 
travel and patronage the roads have. The Metro- 



69 



BOARi:> OF ALr>EIiMEN 



politan passengers have increased nearly a million 
a year since the Highland road was chartered. 
There is no doubt one-lifth of the people on the 
avenue walk down town every day ; a track will 
cause them all to ride. He claimed that the High- 
land road had earned the right to this location, in 
having advanced the interests of the people in 
causing the Metropolitan to do better than before. 
The petition should be granted in the interests of 
the people on the avenue. 

On motion of Alderman Thompson, the whole 
subject, with the petitions and remonstrances, 
was recommitted to the Committee on Paving. 

N. W. DAY'S OMNIBUS ROUTE. 

A remonstrance was received from the Union 
Freight Railway Company, asking for a hearing 
in regard to the petition of N. W. Day's omnibus 
route. 

Alderman Viles— I am requested by the counsel 
for the remonstrants, Mr. P. A. Collins, to ask for 
a hearing on the remonstrance, and he assures me 
that it will not last more than half an hour. 

Alderman Fitzgerald— The remonstrants were 
heard very fully and patiently by the Committee 
on Licenses. Our report is upon my table and will 
be presented at this meeting. I move that the re- 
monstrance be laid upon the table. 

The motion prevailed. 

Later in the session, Alderman Fitzgerald sub- 
mitted a report from the Committee on Licenses, 
in favor of granting the following route to N. W. 
Day, instead of that heretofore allowed to him: 

Ordered, That leave be granted to N. W. Day to 
run two coaches from Cambridge, through Cam- 
bridge street, Bowdoin square. Green street. 
Chambers street and Cambridge street, to the 
point of starting; on the express condition, how- 
ever, that neither of said coaches shall stand or 
stop on any iportion of said route, except for the 
purpose of discharging or receiving paisengers. 

Read once. 

LICENSES. 

Alderman Fitzgerald submitted reports from 
the Committee on Licenses as follows : 

Leave to withdraw on petition of E. E. Clark, 
trustee, ei aZ., that Bedford street be cleared of 
job wagons, etc. 

Hack License Refused— George M. Morse, Hotel 
Boylstou. 

Hack License Granted — Timothy Wallace, 2 
Kneeland street, after 8 P. M. 

Junk Dealer Licensed— Charles G. Green, 24 
Newbern street. 

Junk Collector Licensed- James Crudden, 188 
Fourth street. 

Common Victuallers Licensed— G. L. Nelson, 
218 Harrison avenue. 

Wagon License Granted— I. K. Baker, 16 Union 
street. 

Amusement Licenses Granted— D. S. Thomas, 
exhibition of pedestrianism' by Bertha von Hil- 
lern at Music Hall, March 2 and 3; Jacob Reid, to 
exhibit apostolic, musical and astronomical clock 
at Horticultural Hall. 

Auctioneers Licensed — James J. Dennis, 20 
Court street; Johnson, Moody & Co., 116 Pearl 
street; AV. G. Burnham, 7 Exchange place (re- 
newal). 

JMinors' Applications Granted — Thirty-three 
newsboys. 

Severally accepted. 

SECOND ASSISTANT ASSESSORS ABOLISHED, 

Alderman Fitzgerald submitted the foUoAving : 
The joint special committee appointed to in- 
vestigate the various departments of the City 
Government, with a view of reporting what re- 
ductions in salaries and clerical hire maybe made 
in each department without detriment to the pub- 
lic service, and also whether any department can 
be abolished or consolidated with any other de- 
partment, respectfully represent that they are of 
the opinion that the Second Assistant Assessors 
of taxes can be dispensed with without diminish- 
ing the eificiency of the Assessors' Department ; 
and they beg leave to submit herewith an ordi- 
nance abolishing the office of Second Assistant 
Assessor. If this measure is adopted a saving of 
over $10,000 per annum will be effected. The com- 
mittee therefore respectfully recommend the i^as- 
sage of the following ordinance : 
An Ordinance 
To amend an ordinance concerning the assess- 
ment and collection of taxes. 
Be it ordained, etc. 

Section 1. The first section of the ordinance 
concerning the assessment and collection of taxes, 
printed in the edition of the statutes and ordi- 



nances for tjie year 1876, is hereby amended by 
striking out the words "and the names of the per- 
sons to be voted for as Second Assistant Assessors 
of taxes." 

Sect. 2. The said ordinance is hereby further 
amended by striking out the whole ■ of the fourth 
section thereof. 

Sect. 3. The said ordinance is hereby further 
amended by striking out of the ninth section 
thereof the words "and the Second Assistant As- 
sessors." 

Sect. 4. The said ordinance is hereby further 
amended by striking out of the fourth and fifth 
lines of the tenth section the words "or Second 
Assistant Assessors." Ana by striking out all af- 
ter the word "Assessors" in the seventh line of the 
said section. 

Sect. 5. The said ordinance is hereby further 
amended by striking out of the eleventh section 
thereof the words "or Second." 

Sect. 6. This ordinance shaU take effect upon 
its passage. 

The report was accepted. 

Alderman Fitzgerald — As it is important that 
this matter shall be passed upon, and as there ap- 
pears to be a great deal of unanimity about the 
passage of this ordinance, I move that it take its 
second reading tonight. 

The ordinance was read a second time and put 
upon its passage. 

Alderman Fitzgerald — The amendments are 
simply the striking out the portions of the or- 
dinance that provide for the election of the 
Second Assistant Assessors and define their 
duties. In our investigations into the va- 
rious departments we called the heads of 
the departments before us; and in the 
consideration of this matter we called Mr. Hills, 
the chairman of the Board of Assessors. Our 
committee were unanimous about the matter 
themselves. They had an idea — and it was con- 
firmed by the testimony of the chairman of the 
Board of Assessors-r-that the Second A ssistant As- 
sessors, considering the way in which they are 
elected, are as useful to the Assessors' Department 
as the fifth wheel is to a coach. Mr. Hills said 
himself that eight or nine might possibly be good, 
eight or nine more might be indifferent, and the 
remainder good for nothing. Last year, he said, 
they elected an exceptionally good set of assess- 
ors' as compared with those elected in 
former years. He said that if the Board 
were careful in the selection of the thirty-three 
First Assistant Assessors, the public service and the 
Department would not suffer by the abolition of 
the office of Second Assistant Assessor, while $10,- 
000 would be saved. We unanimously reported 
that it ought to be done. I think there was one 
member of the committee whose mind was not 
made up, but with the exception of that member 
we are thoroughly agreed upon it, and did not 
hesitate ten minutes as to the advisability of abol- 
ishing those offices. If any reduction war. to be 
made in that department, the chairman of the 
Board of Assessors said there was the place to 
make it, without any detriment to the public ser- 
vice. 

The ordinance was passed unanimously. 

Alderman Fitzgerald moved a reconsideration, 
hoping it would not prevail. Lost. Sent, down. 

FANEUIL HALL. 

Alderman Fitzgerald submitted a report from 
the Committee on Faneuil Hall in favor of grant- 
ing the use of said hall to John L. Stevenson et al. 
to hold a public meeting on Tuesday Evening, Feb. 
13, to listen to an address by P. M. Arthur "on the 
strikes of the locomotive engineers in this country 
and Canada. Accepted. 

HARBOR MASTER AND POLICE DUTY. 

Alderman Fitzgerald submitted the following : 
The joint special committee appointed to in- 
vestigate, the various departments of the City 
government with a view of reporting what reduc- 
tions in salaries and clerical hire may be made 
without detriment to the public service, respect- 
fully represent that the City Council is authorized 
by chapter 64 of the acts of the year 1862 to pro- 
vide by ordinance for adding to the duties of the 
Harbor Master the duties of Captain of the Har- 
bor Police, the act to take effect as soon as it is 
accepted by the City Council. The committee 
recommend that the act be accepted in order that 
the necessary ordinance may be passed in case it 
should hereafter be thought expedient to invest 
the Harbor Master with police powers. They 
recommend the passage of an order— That 
chapter 64 of the acts of the year 1862, entitled 



FEBRUAIIY IS 



1877 



70. 



'.'An Act coneerning the Harbor Master of the City 
of Boston," approved March 11, 1862, be and the 
same is hereby accepted. 
Read once. ' 

SINKING FUXD AND UNEXPENDED BALANCES OF 
APPROPRIATIONS. 

Alderman Fitzgerald submitted the following: 

The joint special committee appointed to inves- 
tigate the various departments of the City Gov- 
ernment, with a view to reportine what reduction 
in salaries and clerical hire may "be made in each 
department, without detriment to the public ser- 
vice, and also whether any department can be 
abolished, or consolidated with any other depart- 
ment, beg leave to submit herewith an or- 
dinance to amend the ordinance in rela- 
tion to Finance, for the purpose of provid- 
ing that the unexpended balances of appropria- 
tions shall, at the end of the present municipal 
year, be carried over to next year instead of be- 
ing paid into the Sinking Fund. The revenue ac- 
cruing this year applicable to the redemption of 
the city debt will be sufficient to meet the amount 
required by statute to be annually paid into the 
Sinking Fund without the aidjof the unexpended 
balances. The amount of the debt to be provided 
for which averages due in fifteen years from Jan. 
1, 1877, is $31,484,147.30. The amount required to 
be raised each year to redeem the above amount 
is $1,511,868, earning jfour per cent, per annum. 

The amount of interest on bonds held by sink- 
ing funds from April 1, 1876, to April 1, 1877, will 
be, say, $800,000; revenue actually received 
from City Treasurer from April 30, 1876, to Jan. 31, 
1877, $536,000; revenue actually received from City 
Treasurer Feb. 3, 1877, $60,685; reyenue from liquor 
licenses to Jan. 1, 1877, $128,456; total, $1,525,141; 
showing that the ways and means are already in 
excess of the requirements. Under the present 
system the revenue from betterments and sales of 
land is used each month for cancelling debt which 
will not mature for fifteen or twenty years hence. 
If this revenue was paid into the Sinking Fund it 
would offset the amount which is required to be 
raised by taxation to that extent, and the amounts 
which aie derived from other sources applicable to 
the payment of the Sinking Fund during 
the present year would be sufficient to 
meet all obligations without using the un- 
expended balances. The unexpended bal- 
ances at the end of the present financial year will 
amount to a considerable sum, and, if carried for- 
ward to the next year will, in the opinion of your 
committee, considerably lessen the amount to be 
raised by taxation. They recommend the pas- 
sage of the following : 

An Ordinance 
to amend an ordinance in relation to finance. 

Be it ordained, etc. 

Section 1. The twenty-fourth section of the 
ordinance in lelation to finance, printed in the 
edition of the statutes and ordinances for the 
year 1876, is hereby repealed and the following- 
enacted in place thereof : 

Section 24. All excess of revenue over esti- 
mates, at the close of each financial year, shall be 
set apart and paid by the treasurer to the commis- 
sioners on the sinking funds created by this ordi- 
nance, and only the residue of the full amount 
required, as specified in section twenty-two, shall 
be raised by taxation the year next succeeding the 
close of each financial year ; and the amount so 
required shall be certified by the said commis- 
sioners to the Auditor of Accounts, and become a 
part of the amount to be raised by taxation, with- 
out further votes by the City Council. 

Read once. 

GLOBE GASLIGHT COMPANY'S PROPOSITION. 

Alderman Fitzgerald presented the following, 
which was read, and, on motion of Alderman 

hompson, referred to the Committee on Lamps: 

Office of the Globe Gas Light Company, i 

54 Kilby street, cor. Water street, ! 

Boston, Feb. 12, 1877. ) 

The Hon. the Mayor and Aldermen of the city 
of Boston— A proposition from the Globe Gas Light 
Company to save the city of Boston over $120,000 
per annum in lighting streets. Gentlemen — The 
Globe Gas Light Company of the city of Boston 
beg leave to call your attention to their method of 
lighting the streets of towns and cities and to ask 
your consideration of the following facts: It is 
now costing the city of Boston about $500,000 per 
annum to light the streets, with a prospect of 
large increase as the gas pipes are extended and 
the present oil lights changed to gas, or new 
lamps called for. By reference to the report of 



the Superintendent of Lamps you will notice that 
it is costing from $58 to $60 per annum for each 
gas light now used in Dorchester, Brookline, 
Brighton, AVest Roxbury, South and East Boston, 
and about $38 for each in the city prop- 
er, an average of about $49 for each 
light. This does not include the cost of 
repairing and some other items of large 
amount, such as furnishing wrought-iron pipe, 
gas cocks, burner tips, etc., amounting for 1876 to 
about thirty thousand dollars. The Globe Gas 
Light Company have perfected a system of light- 
ing streets with gasoline, now in use in ove?: two 
hundred cities and towns in the United States, 
among them the cities of Worcester, Taunton, 
Newton, Newburyport, Mass., New Haven, Meri- 
deu. New Britain, Bridgeport, Conn., Newport 
and Pawtucket, R. I., Bangor, Augusta and Lew- 
iston. Me., Utica and other places in New York, 
Cincinnati and other places in Ohio. This system 
does away with all expense of laying mains in 
public parks or streets, always the great source of 
expense in using gas, and furnishes a light equal 
to the best coal gas at a great saving in cost. It 
the gas lights in the streets of that part of the 
city of Boston outside of the city proper should be 
changed to this manner of lighting, a saving 
would be made of over one hundred and twenty 
thousand dollars ($120,000) per annum, a very 
large sum in the course of ten years. In view of 
these facts, the Globe Gas Light Company make 
the following proposition to the city of Boston, 
viz. : They will attach their patent "fix- 
tures" to all the street lanterns now in use 
in the city of Boston, or any number 
of the same not less than 1000, will furnish fluid, 
and cause the same to be lighted every night in 
the year from sunset to sunrise, for the term of 
three years, furnishing a ligl t equal to that now 
in use'in this city, keeping the lantern clean and 
in repair, the city to furnish the needed glass only 
— for this service the city to pay the Globe Gas 
Light Company the sum of $38 50-100 per annum 
tor each and every lamp so lighted and cared for. 
If said service is not performed to the satisfaction 
of the Board of Aldermen, said company will take 
away theii' fixtures at thirty days' notice, leaving 
all lanterns in as good condition as they found 
them, simple wear only excepted, receiving pay 
only for the tiine lighted, (payments to be made in 
monthly instalments). We trust that your honor- 
able board will give this company an opportunity 
to show that a great saving can be made in this 
department without deteriorating from the char- 
acter of the service as now performed. 
Respectfully submitted, 

The Globe Gas Light Co., 
By their agents, 
Fked'k a. Brown, 
John A. Fletcher. 
Samples of these lights are now burning in front 
of St. Paul's Church, Tremont street, to which 
your attention is invited. 

police charitable association. 

Alderman Robinson presented a communication 
from H. P. FoUansbee, secretary, transmitting the 
by-laws of the Police Relief Charitable Associa- 
tion, for approval of the Board. Referred to Com- 
mittee on Police. 

police sergeants. 

Alderman Robinson offered an order — That until 
otherwise ordered the maximum number of Ser- 
geants of Police be fixed at forty-five. 

Alderman Robinson — At the last meeting the 
Mayor appointed and the Board confirmed two 
Sergeants of Police, which was not an increase of 
the'force, but were promotions in the department. 
The appointments were rendered necessary by the 
length of the beats in West Roxbury and Brighton. 
The ordinance limits tlie number of sergeants to 
forty-two, so that the number must be increased. 
This does not increase the force. I ask that the 
order take its second reading. 

Alderman Fitzgerald— Does this contemplate an 
increase of the force? 

Alderman Robinson — Not at all. 

Alderman Fitzgerald— It is simply an increase of 
the pay of those men and not an increase of the 
force ?* 

Alderman Robinson— Yes. It is necessary, in 
order to confirm what the Board did at the last 
meeting. 

The order was read a second time and passed. 

PAVING REPORTS AND ORDERS. 

Alderman Robinson submitted the following 
from the Committee on Paving: 



71 



BOARU OF ALDERMEN 



Orders establishing grades as follows, according 
to plans and profiles deposited in City Surveyor's 
office: Dorchester avenue, between Crescent ave- 
nue and Savin Hill avenue, plan dated Oct. 1, 
1875; Hudson street, between Dudley and Clifton 
streets, plan dated July 19, 1876; Canal street, 
Charlestown, plan dated Feb. 7, 1877; Lincoln 
street, Charlestown, plan dnted Jan. 30, 1877. Sev 
erally read twice and passed. 

Reports that leave be granted John B. Lord to 
move two wooden buildings from 410 Main street 
to 391 Main street, Ward 4. Severally accepted. 

Report and order of notice for hearing on Mon- 
day, March 12, at four o'clock P. M.,on petition of 
Metropolitan Railroad Comijauy, tor a track in 
Lenox street from Tremout street to Washington 
street. Order passed. 

Ordered, That the assessment of |15.82 laid up- 
on J. W. Griggs for edgestones on Fort avenue, 
be and the same is hereby abated, and that said 
sum be assessed on John G. King, who is owner 
of the estate for which edgestones were furnished. 

Read twice ajid passed. 

Ordered, That from the assessment laid upon 
the estate of Martha S. Katzman for edgestones 
and sidewalks furnished on Tremout street, there 
be abated the sum of $14.06, and that said amount 
be assessed to the heirs of John Schayer. 

Read twice and passed. 

COI>"SOLIDATION OF CITY REGISTRAR'S DBPART- 
JIENT AND BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Alderman Wilder offered an order— That his 
Honor the Mayor be requested to petition the 
Legislature now in session for the passage of an 
act transferring the powers and duties of the City 
Registrar to the Board of Health. 

Mderman Tiles— 1 hope that order will not be 
passed tonight. I would like to look into it and 
hear some good reason for it. 

Alderman Wilder — I do not care to press the 
passage of the order tonight. I do not know that 
we shall have any necessity for such legislation; 
but it seemed to me to be perfectly proper that, 
in case the Committee on Retrenchment should 
see fit to recommend the consolidation of those 
two departments, we should obtain the necessary 
legislation to effect it if the Board deem it best to 
do so. I do not care to press the passage of the 
order tonight if the gentlemen desire to have it 
lie over. 

The order went over. 

AUSTIN FARM BUILDINGS, ETC. 

Alderman Thomijson submitted a report from 
the Joint Committee on Public Institutions in 
favor of certain transfers to meet the expense of 
fitting up buildings at Austin farm, maintenance, 
etc., and recommending the reference of the same 
to the Committee on Finance. Accepted and said 
reference ordered. Sent down. 

BETTERMENTS ASSUMED. 

Alderman Thompson submitted the following 
from the Committee on Streets on the part of the 
Board : 

Report and Order- That the city assume and 
pay the betterment assessment of |900 for open- 
ing Swett street, upon an estate of the trustees of 
the Roxbury Grammar School on said street, held 
for a long time by the city of Boston under a lease 
from saicl trustees providing for the payment by 
the lessee of all rates and taxes falling due upon 
said estate during its pendency. Read once. 

Ordered, That the city assume and pay the bet- 
terment assessment of $100 for the opening of 
Swett street laid upon the remainder of the estate 
bought by the city of William Hardy, in settle- 
ment of damages occasioned it by the said open- 
ing of Swett street through the same— such re- 



mainder having been since sold by the city under 
the stipulation that the said betterment assessed 
thereon should be assumed and paid as herein 
provided. 
Read twice and passed. 

CONTRACT FOB WATER PIPES. 

On motion of Alderman Thompson, the vote of 
the last meeting, by which an order passed to al- 
low the Boston Water Board to contract tor de- 
livery of iron pipe at an estimated cost of f 43,000 
was reconsidered. 

(o- Alderman Thompson moved to amend the order 
by striking out $43,000 and inserting in place 
tliereof $65,000. 

Alderman iTitzgerald— I do not rise to oppose, 
but to ask an explanation of the order. 

Alderman Thompson — The Water Board report- 
ed to the Water Committee that they would re- 
quire 1000 tons of pipe for the Cochituate works 
and 600 tons for the Mystic works; and by some 
error in the computation, they got the sum of $43,- 
000 instead of $65,000. It is the same amount of 
pipe, but it costs more money than the order first 
estimated. 

The Chairman- The price per ton is just the 
same. It is simplv an error in the figuring. The 
$43,000 should have been $65,000. 

The amendment was adopted, and the order as 
amended was passed. Sent down. 

STABLES. 

Alderman Viles submitted reports from the 
Committee on Health on the part of the Board — 
That leave be granted to occupy stables by Patrick 
Welch, on Bennett street, near Market street; A. 
M. Morrison, on High street. Ward 23; by Timo- 
thy Wheaton, at 814 Sixth street. Severally ac- 
cepted. 

REMOVAL OF NIGHT SOIL. 

Alderman Viles submitted a report from the 
Joint Committee on Health on the order in refer- 
ence to reduction in charge for removing night 
soil— That the contract made on the 16th day of 
October, 1874, foi a term of three years from Jan. 
1, 1875, expires Dec. 31, 1877. They deem it inexpe- 
dient at this time to take further action. Accept- 
ed. Sent down. 

ARMORIES. 

Alderman O'Brien submitted the following from 
the Committee on Armories ; 

Ordered, That the Committee on Armories be 
authorized to. expend a sum not exceeding $500 in 
furnishing and fitting up the armory of Company 
C, Fourth Battalion of Infantry, M. V. M., at 
Boylston Hall; said sum to be charged to the ap- 
propriation for Armories. Read twice and passed. 

Report and orders — That the allowance tor rent 
heretofore paid on account of rent for the head- 
quarters of the Ninth Regiment of Infantry, at 
738 Washington street, be discontinued from and 
after Feb. 12, 1877, and that the same sum be al- 
lowed and paid on account of rent for headquar- 
ters of the Ninth Battalion of Infantry, M. V. M., 
at 61 Court street, beginning Feb. 12, 1877, and con- 
tinuing until otherwise ordered ; to be charged to 
the appropriation for Armories. 

Ordered — That the headquarters of the Ninth 
Battalion of Infantry, M. V. M., at 61 Court street, 
be approved. 

Severally read twice and passed. 

Report and order — That the Committee on Armo- 
ries be authorized to expend the sum of $200 in 
furnishing and repairing the headquarters of the 
First Battalion of Cavalry, M. V. M., at No. 37 Tre- 
mout street — said sum to be charged to the appro- 
priation for Armories. Order read twice and 
passed. 

Adjourned, on motion of Alderman Viles. 



COMMON GO UN OIL. 



72 



CITY OF BOSTON. 

Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 

FEBRUARY \4r, 1877. 



Special meeting at one o'clock, ¥. M., his Houor 
the Mayor presiding. 

In cailing- the Board to order the Mayor said. 

For a few days past the depot of the Boston & 
Maine load in Boston has been V)esieged by a 
large crowd of people attracted there in conse- 
quence of the strike, and the business of the road 
has been seriously interfered with. A large force 
of Boston police has been on duty at the station 
since the strike commenced, but the pow- 
ers of the police were such that the offi- 
cers are wholly powerless to do any- 
thing unless a breach of the peace is committed. 
It so happens that chapter 372 of the Acts of 1874 
provided for just such an emergency in allowing 
the appointment of railroad police, and the Bos- 
ton & Maine Railroad Company had petitioned to 
havft certain employes of their road appointed un- 
der said act. 

The Mayor submitted the following appoint- 
ments of Railroad Police, on the petition of said 
company, in accordance with said chapter: 

W. J. C. Kenney, J. C. Robinson, Charles M. 
Chase, Charles Messer, Freil. N. Parker, C. W. 
Munroe, P. A. Newton, Jacob Varney, W. L. Rand, 
E. L. Hall, Jacob Colbath. J. C. Hutchins, Seth 
Pratt, Moses Lovering, George L. Magoun, Daniel 
McCarty, Dennis Coughtrana, Meltiah Clapp, 
Hannibal Waterhouse, "W . H. Burrell, H. L. Brack- 
ett, J. W. Austin, Jr.. 8. B. Aldrich, Daniel H. 
Payne, Henry J. V. Myers, William B. Tarleton, 
Joseph W. Piper, Felix T. Ferry, George T. Pink- 
erton. Thomas H. Tracy, Nelson W. Haskell, James 
Ruby, Charles D. Burke, James E. Coolidge, 
Michael A. Welch, Patrick J. McDermott, Thomas 
A. Slater, Hugh F. Kelly, Patrick Connolly, 
Thomas F. Macalief, Cyrus P. Austin, Andrew 
Agin, Matthew J. McGuire, JohnMcHugh, Ed- 



ward Butler, Patrick Meilady, John O'Brien, , 
William W. Campbell, William Collopy, John 
McCabe, Frank M. Harden, George Richardson, 
Edward W. Griggs, Thomas Moley, Samuel D. 
Chamberlin, Alvin Stevens. 

Al"'.erman O'Brien — Mr. vlayor, I would like to 
ask if there is anything this Board can do to pre- 
vent a leading railroad corporation running their 
trains with incompetent engineers and firemen, 
and thus endangering the lives of their passen- 
gers. I know a number of gentlemen who live on 
the line of that road who feel that their lives are 
thus endangered. 

Alderman Gibson— I think the Alderman is cor- 
rect in his views. I have seen in the p.npers that 
some of the new engineers had burned their flues, 
and I know of the liability to explosion 
by such means. I passed by the depot and 
everything was quiet there. It is a pub- 
lic place, and it is a question whether 
any police have the right to turn these 
people out of the depot if they do not make any 
trouble. If we have a right to regulate the safety 
of the people in the depots, we have the same 
riglit to regulate the safety of the public in travel- 
ling. 

Alderman Thompson— It seems to me that this 
Board have nothing to do with the internal ar- 
rangements of the road. That is beyond our pow- 
er, and if the Board should attempt it, or volun- 
teer any suggestions, they would probably be told 
by the corporation that they were responsible to a 
higher power. 

Alderman Wilder — I do not see that this contro- 
versy has anything to do with the Aldermen. All 
we have to do is to grant this petition or not. It 
is not for us to say which side of the controversy 
is wrong. Although I might think one side or the 
other in the wrong, this is no place for me 
to express such an opinion. I regret that the pas- 
sengers of the road have been so incommoded, but 
I do not think that the recording of my vote in 
favor of the appointments is any expression of 
opinion upon the merits of the question. I hope 
the petition will be granted. 

The appointments were confirmed. 

Adjourned. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Oommon Council, 

FEBRUARY 15, 1877. 



Regular meeting at 714 P. M., Benjamin Pope, 
President, in the chair. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Petitions were referred in concurrence. 

Annual report of the Board of License Commis- 
sioners and quarterly report of the City Clerk. 
Severally placed on file. 

Report inexpedient to take further action on 
subject of price charged for removal of night 
soil. Accepted in concurrence. 

Report of reference to Committee on Finance of 
request of Directors for Public Institutions for an 
appropriation of $5000 for Austin Farm Poorhouse. 
Accepted and referred in concurrence. 

Order for contract for iron water-i)ipes, for next 
I financial year, at a cost not exceeding .f 65,000. 
Passed to a second reading. 

Mr. Fraser of Ward 6—1 would like to have this 
order passed tonight. It is of great importance 
to the Water Board that it should take its final 
reading tonight. Some of the pipe is sixty-inch 
and some forty-inch, and it will take a long time 
to have it made. It is importa.nt that the Water 
Board have facilities foi- advertising at once, in 
order to make advantageous contracts. If they 
cannot advertise at this time it is probable that 
the work will be hindered in the spring. 1 move 
a suspension of the rule, in order that the order 
may take its second reading tonight. 

The rule was suspended. The order was read a 
second time and init upon its passage. 



Mr. Thompson of Ward 9— This order was before 
the Board of Aldermen, and some reference was 
made to a change in the sum asked for — from , 
forty-three thousand dollars to sixty-five thousand 
dollars. As far as the record of the proceedings 
there goes, there is no explanation given ; and 
perhaps some gentleman on the committee can 
explain why that change was made. 

Mr. Fraser— The chairman of the Water Board 
has notified me that there was a change. In 
making up the bill the clerk of the board made an 
error which put it back one week in the Board of 
Aldermen. The error was made in casting up the 
account. They estimated thejprice of the pipe at 
forty dollars a ton, and you will readily perceive 
that the whole will cost $65,000. 

Mr. Thompson— I understand the gentleman to 
say that it will require a certain number of pipe 
at forty dollars a ton, and that the clerk of the 
board made an error which changed the amount 
from s^65,000 to $45,000. 

Mr. Fraser— The clerk notified me that the error 
was made in making certain figures $2400 instead 
of $24,000. 

The order was passed in concurrence. 

Subsequently Mr. Fraser moved a reconsidera- 
tion, hoping it wo.uld not prevail. i_.ost. 

ABOLITION OF ASSISTANT ASSESSORS. 

A report and ordinance came down to amend au 
ordinance concerning the assessment and collec- 
tion of taxes, to abolish the second assistant as- 
sessors. 

The question was on giving the ordinance a sec- 
ond reading. 

Mr. Wilbur of Ward 20— As this is a very impor- 
tant subject, I would like to inquire of the honor- 
able committee who have this matter in charge, 
what is the object of abolishing the oflSce of 
Second Assistant Assessor ? whether it is a mat- 
ter of retrenchment, solely, or is it because of the 
the inefficiency of the Assessors? I should like to 



73 



COMMON ' d't>'-tJ'N OIL 



have some information upon that point befoi'e I 
can Vote intelligently. 

Mr. Webster of Ward 3— As one of the members 
of that committee, I will try to give the gentleman 
very briefly the information he desires. It seems 
to me to be a matter of public notoriety, and it is 
also confirmed by my own experience, and it is 
also confirmed by the testimony before the com- 
mittee, from the chairman of the Board of Asses- 
sors, that these Second Assistant Assessors have 
not been, and are not likely to be, selected with a 
view to their peculiar qualifications for the place; 
that they are not always men experienced in real- 
estate valuations, but that the selection is a matter 
of local politics and a reward to party friends for 
services in electing members of the Common 
Council. It has been supposed that the First As- 
sistant Assessors were chosen with a great deal 
of care, and therefore that this matter of electing 
the Second Assistants could be left in the hands 
of politicians without any very serious detriment 
to the public interest. In the Board of Aldermen 
the chairman of the committee quoted from a 
statement made by Mr. Hills, the chairman of the 
Board of Assessors, and Mr. Hills requested 
me to do him the justice to state wherein 
his ideas and those of the Alderman 
were not exactly in unison. The Alder- 
man stated that Mr. Hills testified that nine of 
the Second Assistants were fair, nine were in- 
efficient, and the rest were good for nothing. Mr. 
Hills said that nine were good, nine were fair, and 
the rest he did not wish to say very much about; 
but there was not a very essential difference be- 
tween his remarks and those of the Alderman 
after all. He also testified before us that in case 
any reduction should be made in the department, 
that was the place to make it; and, in his opinion, 
if the Second Assistants were abolished, 
the Board of Permanent Assessors and the 
First Assistants, it the latter were care- 
fully selected, would make a very efficient 
board. The change made last year, taking the 
Second Assistant Assessors out of the dooming 
board, was a saving of ten thousand dollars ; and 
if we abolish that office and rely upon the First 
Assistant Assessors, it is a positive" gain. The 
only qualification to this recommendation is 
that it the Board could appoint the First 
Assistants, or be sure that e ery man elected 
would be qualified for the position. If six 
or eight inefficient Assessors are elected, the cus- 
tom has been to change them around and put 
them with First Assistants who could carry 
them along, and thus they could get alona- 
very well. I intended to offer an ordinance 
giving the Assessors power to appoint the First 
Assistants, but after talking with some members 
of the Council I could not find that they were in 
favor of it, and I concluded that it would be a 
waste of powder to offer it. But my idea would be 
to give them the power to appoint their assistants, 
so that they could secure good men far whom they 
would be responsible. But still, from what Mr. 
Hills testified before the committee, and from 
what we can learn, the committee thought it 
would be a saving and would not in any serious de- 
gree impair the efficiency of the department 
to abolish the office of Second Assistant 
Assessors. We have got friends that we may wish 
to see elected ; I have two or three friends who I 
believe would make good Secona Assistant Assess- 
ors, and I would work as hard for my friends as 
any one. But nevertheless, if we are going to 
purify the aepartments from politics, I will not 
consider the wishes of my friends, and will go for 
the policy of retrenchment first. 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 5 — If these Second Assistant 
Assessors have been useless all this time, it has 
been a pretty costly experiment tor the time we 
have had them. But lam not a believer in the 
proposition of my friend from Charlestown. I do 
not believe in any man-on-horseback government. 
I believe this City Government is capable of elect- 
ing a Board of Assessors ; if not, why are we ca- 
pable of electing those five First Assessors? But 
here is an appropriation bill of nine millions — that 
is the lowest I have voted on since I have been a 
member of the Council— and the money is to be 
raised by taxation. Now it seems to me that thirty- 
eight men are enough if we put in the best men 
that we can get. So far as my limited informa- 
tion goes I have always tried to vote for the best 
men, and I have not heard any great fault found. 
It is rather a ticklish business for people to go . 
round with a pencil and put your name down and 
appraise your property. I do not expect that peo- 
ple will be satisfied. Some people want to appear 



very rich except wlien the Assessors come round 
about the first of Msiy. I want to vote intelligent- 
ly upon this question, and if an expenditure is use- 
less, whether it is $10,000 or ten cents, I want 
to get rid of it. I do not want to vote one 
dollar for taxation unless it is necessary. It is on- 
ly a question about the character of those men- 
nine are good, nnie are fair, and the rest are not 
good for anything. Well, the rest might not want 
to speak of the board. I want all the light I can 
whether this measure is necessary. 

Mr. Mowry of Ward 3—1 wish to inquire, upon 
the consideration of this matter, if the Board of 
Assessors do recommend the abolition of the Sec- 
ond Assistant Assessors? 

Mr. Wilbur — As my question has not been an- 
swered, there is just one point that I would like to 
know of the committee. It seems to me that it is 
not the mere saving of ten thousand dollars 
that we should look at in this matter. 
This ten thousand dollars is nothing compared 
w ith the complaints that we have of the valua- 
tion of property. Now, the gentleman says that 
one of the main reasons for abolishing the Second 
Assistant Assessors is that about ten are efficient, 
about ten more are ordinary, and the rest are 
good for Qothing. Now if, as he says, in electing 
the Second Assistants it is a matter of politics 
rather than the qualifications of the men, I can- 
not see why the same rule does not work in re- 
gard to the election of the First Assistants. It 
does seem to me that if we have elected in- 
efficient Second Assistant Assessors we might 
under the same rule elect inefficient Assessors. 
Now they say that a change should be made. 1 
take it that two heads are better than one in the 
valuation of real estate. It seems to me that mat- 
ters are constantly arising in that department in 
relation to the valuation of property, that it would 
be hard for one man to make up his mind, and he 
would have to run down to city hall to find out 
from the Principal Assessors whether he is right 
or wrong. It seems to me that if there were two 
assessors together — a first and a second— that are 
efficient, they could settle that matter, and 
it would be done better than if one were 
alone. Still I have not looked into the matter ; 
but it is something that should not be acted upon 
hastily. I think it requires a good deal of study. 
I think there is something wrong. I introduced 
an order here, and it was passed and sent to the 
Board of Aldermen, looking to the establishment 
of some different system of valuation. It was dis- 
cussed there, and they thought that it amounted 
to nothing. It seems to me that it does amount 
to something. If there could he a board outside 
of this City Government that could present a 
plan, and give us some of their ideas that 
could be presented to us here, we could 
get something out of it. I think it is 
admitted by the testimony given to us by this 
committee that the Principal Assessors feel that 
if they could have good assistants they would like 
to have them, but that, if they have got to rely 
upon the election by the Council, the chances are 
that they will not have good assistants. It seems 
to me that the matter might be arranged by stat- 
ute law or ordinance, so that the assistants might 
be appointed by the Board of Assessors, so that 
we might get some good men as First and Second 
Assistants. It seems to me that the mere matter 
of saving in that department should not be passed 
upon hastily. 

Mr. Day of Ward 4 — I am rather inclined to 
doubt the wisdom or the expediency of dispensing 
with the services of these men. It seems to me 
that the sa me argument which has been applied 
for abolishing the Second Assistants would apply 
with equal justice to the First Assistants. The 
ordinance seems to be rather sweeping in its 
character, and I think we had better delay action 
in this matter, and see whether it is a good thing 
or not. 

The order was declared passed to a second read- 
ing. Mr. Stone of Ward 3 doubted the vote. The 
Council divided— 34 for, 27 against. The ordi- 
nance went over. 

NOMINATION LAID OVER. 

The nomination of James C. Tucker as Superin- 
tendent of Public Buildings came ut^ as unfinish- 
ed business. 

Mr. Reed of Ward 17—1 trust that as the Com- 
mittee on Salaries and Expenditures intend to 
make a report next Monday, this nomination will 
lie over for one week, and Imake that motion. 

The motion prevailed. 



FEBRUARY 15, 1877 



74 



WAGES OF LABOftERS IX PAYI^"(; I)BPABT31KXT. 

Mr. McDonald of Ward 12 moved to reconsider 
the vote whereby the Council refused to send up 
the resolve in favor of allowing laboring men in 
the Street Department $1.75 per day. 

Mr. McDonald— When I offered the resolve at 
our last meeting, I refrained from speaking upon 
it for the simple reason that the resolve spoke for 
itself. In endeavoring to secure a reconsideration 
of the resolve tonight, it is not with the intention 
of rushing the matter or creating any heated dis- 
cussion in our midst. Had it been any other sub- 
ject, I assure you, gentlemen of the Council, that 
I should have let it pass and have forgotten all 
about it. On the contrary, being an important re- 
solve, I wanted to ask the opinion of this sensible 
body in relation to the laboring men, and I could 
not let it pass by without calling your attention to 
it again. In offering the resolve I wished to have 
it go before the gentlemen who have jurisdiction 
over the matter, that they might see for them- 
selves the pi-edicament that these men are placed 
in. We could not call the work they have been 
doing chanty, for if we reflect for a moment, we 
must come to the jonclusion that there lias been 
more work done for the past month than there 
has been for some time past; if there is plenty of 
work for these men to do, is it just and con- 
sistent to take advantage of these laboring 
men by calling it charity? It would be char- 
ity to send men to do work that is unneces- 
saiy to be done, and pay them for it every 
evening. But the gentlemen employed on the 
streets are obliged to wait a great deal longer than 
that for their pay. I trust that the resolve will be 
reconsidered, for if you take time to calculate, 
gentlemen , you will find that a dollar and twenty- 
five cents a day is too small pay for any laooring 
man. Suppose there are five in the family to rely 
upon this dollar and twenty-five cents for support; 
that is at the rate of twenty-five cents per head. 
Can any man live upon it? Allowing twenty-five 
cents for each individual, and some of the young- 
ones will consume a great deal more than the old 
ones at the table — perhaps members of the 
Council are aware of that fact. There are three 
meals to be got for twenty-five cents a day, not 
including Sunday. How can a man live on it? 
Why, sir, it is already death to some of the work- 
ing men. It is worse than cruelty to animals. 
Gentlemen of the Covmcil, let us reconsider this 
resolve and pass it; and by so doing we will be 
living up to that good old maxim, "Render justice 
to all men if we would be just to ourselves." Let 
us encourage instead of discouraging the laboring- 
man. 

The reconsideration was lost by a division — 30 
for, 31 against. 

I'OWEIt TO OKEATE BOARDS AND COM .MISSIONS, 
AND ABOLISH THEM. 

The Council took up the special assignment for 
8 P. M., viz. : 

Order for the Mayor to petition for an act to au- 
thorize the City Council to create or abolish 
boards of commissions, etc., as therein set forth. 

The question was on giving the order a second 
reading. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 9- This order looks in two 
directions, both towards the creation of new com- 
missions and towards the destruction of commis- 
sions already created. So far as it looks toward the 
creation of Boards of Commissioners, I believe in 
the passage of the order. I feel and have long felt 
the iiesirahility of giving the different branches 
of the City CoVernineut into the hands of com- 
missioners who shall be paid to attend to the 
work, and who shall make it their busi- 
ness to do so; and I believe that the work 
will be much better done in that way 
than by committees who snatch a few hurried mo- 
ments from the cares of their ))rivate business, 
and come to the City Hall to look after thingg 
which they often do not very much care about. 
Besides, these committees are changing every 
year, while commissions are more permanent. It 
seems to me that so far as it looks to the creation 
of boards by ordinance, it is a very good order. It 
is desirable that we should have the power to cre- 
ate boards by ordinance, and to transfer to 
them any of the city business that we may 
see fit. .A.nd so far as concerns the ques- 
tion of having power to destroy, coinmissions 
already createil, I believe it would be well to have 
that also; but there is one point upon which I 
feel in doubt, whetner this order is a desirable 
one as it stands. It seems to me we shouki ask 
for power to create commissions that, for tht- 



time, would have a certain independence of the 
City Council; that we should not have power 
to set up commissions one day and destroy fhem the 
next. When a commission takes hold of any busi- 
ness and makes a special study of it, they may 
have to do things that are unpopular at first, they 
may have to make some radical reforms, and such 
reforms are generally unpopular at first, and 
it is not desirable that they should be liable to be 
overthrown immediately for doing any temporari- 
ly unpopular act. They should be somewhat free 
from the elfect of po'pular passions and preju- 
dices. The only amendment that I propose to 
this ordinance is to insert after the words 
"by votes passed," the words "ia two suc- 
cessive municipal years." In that way a commis 
sion could not be overthrown immediately. They 
would be subject to the will of the City Council, 
but the verdict oi the people would liave to be 
passed upon the question before a commission 
could really be overthrown. It really seems 
desirable that we should hiive commissions, but 
that they should be made somewhat independent 
of popular passion in this way. I should feel very 
anxious for the order to pass, if amended in the 
way which I propose. 

Mr. Ruffin of Ward 9—1 am not at present per- 
fectly satisfied with the amendment which has 
been offered. I believe in the democratic doc- 
trine that the people are the source of all power, 
and I believe that the exercise of that nower 
should be kept as near the people as possible. 
I believe that in legislating- for the people, 
generally speaking- — and I am now speaking 
of the whole order as it stands — this Council 
alone represents the people, and should do the 
general legislation ; and, having that power, 
they should exercise it freely ana fully, and 
in the interest of the people; and that this 
Council should be the judge of when it is neces- 
sary to exercise that power, whether by the crea- 
tion of an office or by the demolition of one. Now, 
while I entertain that belief, still I am in favor of 
the appointment of commissions. I think they 
may become, and that they have become, 
a necessity even to carry out this gen- 
eral proposition which I have laid down. 
I think that the nme has come when 
we should relieve ourselves, so to speak, of the 
power that is in our hands. I believe that it is 
impossible for the City Government as now organ- 
ized to perform the duties faithfully which it has 
to do. It is no longer possible for gentlemen who 
are engaged in other business to come to City Hail 
and spend the time necessary to be spent in the 
performance of public duties. They cannot spare 
the time. I believe the duties which usually fall 
upon committees ought to be put in the hands of 
persons whose whole time is or should be devoted 
to that business, and that they should be paid for 
it; and there are very many reasons why that 
should be done other than those I have assigned. 
Having persons specially fitted for it, and giving 
their whole time to it. of course commissions of 
that character would be more conversant with a 
subject, and be better qualified to perform 
the duties than would any committee of the 
City Council. We have either to have these 
commissions perform the duties, or else we 
have got to make the Board of Aldermen salaried 
officers, in order that they may devote the whole of 
their time to their public duties. If the Aldermen 
were paid a sufficient salary, so that they could re- 
main in session all the time and devote all of their 
time to the performance of their duties, why then 
that would be another thing. But we have n't ar- 
rived at that point yet. People do not believe 
in tliat. I do not know how they may look 
at it in the future. The Aldermen are not 
paid for their services, and therefore we see the 
necessity for the appointment of those commis- 
sioners to perform the duties now done by joint 
committees of the Common Council and the Board 
of Aldermen. Hence I snail vote for the order. 
At the same time, as I heard the order read, I did 
not pay particular attention to one point, but I 
think it should be framed so that the power to 
frame these commissions should be given exclu- 
sively to the City Council and not by api)ointinent 
by the Mayor, nor by any selection which he shall 
make to lay before the City Council ; but that 
they should be elected by joint, concurrent vote 
of l)oth branches. 

Mr. Clarke of Ward 22 — I would inform the gen- 
tleman that that is the way the order reads. The 
commissioners are to be appointed liy the City 
Council. 

Mr. Rultin— I have not seen it in print add have 



75 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



not read it. Those are my views, and I commend 
the serious consideration of this question to mem- 
bers. I think they will see that hy the increase of 
this work it is necessaiy to put it in the hands of 
commissioners in order that it should be done 
faithfully. 

Mr. Howes of Ward 18— Whatever advantage 
there may be in this order — and I imagine there 
may be some — I should certainly hope that the 
amendment proposed by the gentleman would 
pass. The difficulty in putting the power out of 
the hands of the Council, and carrying on a com- 
mission is, that the Council is very captious as to 
its use, and is very often apt to make trifles ap- 
pear very large indeed. I could conceive, 
sir, that we might this year have had 
a chance to aljolish the Fire Commis- 
mission, for instance, on account of one gentle- 
man's odium for uniforms, and to the views 
of another in regard to vacations. A very little 
feeling might change a very good thing, and I 
think it better to curtail the power of abolishing 
the commission within a short time; and on that 
account I hope the amendment will pass. I think 
we need to take a sober second thought on 
matters of this kind. Public bodies, like in- 
dividuals, are apt to be carried away by 
momentary excitement. I know that im- 
mediately after the great fire a Boston man, who 
had a large amount of property destroyed, re- 
marked that he would like to see the whole City 
Government hanged for allowing the department 
to get into such a condition ; and possibly if some 
Alderman or Councilman had been there he would 
have been hanged to the nearest lamp post. It has 
been found necessary, in all deliberative bodies, 
to have two distinct chambers, in order to have 
one correct the other. We have nothing of that 
kind. Our Board of Aldermen and Common 
Council represent the same popular feeling ; they 
are elected at the same time, and when prejudice 
or excitement carries away one, the other will not 
always correct it. As we cannot correct mistakes 
by different bodies, it is necessary to correct it by 
different spaces of time, and give the people an 
opportunity to express their views after deliberat- 
ing on the subject. 

Mr. Wilbur of Ward 20—1 cannot say that I am 
in favor of the amendment. The gentleman [Mr. 
Crocker] says that the order looks in two direc- 
tions; first to the creation of commissions, and 
second to abolishing them. The latter is the point 
about it that I like; that is the very thing I think 
we ought to have. The delegating of power out of 
the City Council, it seems to me, is a bad thing. It 
looks to me as though we were hardly capable of 
carrying on our business, and therefore we must 
go to the Legislature and have an act passed cre- 
ating commissions and giving them power that 
this Government has no control over. It seems to 
me that we should keep that power in our own 
hands. It is a good deal like a family of children 
who get a little unruly and cannot govern them- 
selves, and they have got to have somebody to 
govern them. I hope we have not got to that 
state yet. We have some commissions created, 
and I do not know that they are good, but I do 
know that we have very little control over them. 
I rather like the order, and I hope it will pass. 

Mr. Clarke of Ward 22—1 am opposed to the 
amendment for this reason : When' we have no 
further use for commissions, I thirk they 
should be abolished by the City Council 
without compelling the city to go to the expense 
of fifteen or twenty thousand dollars of keeping 
them another year when we do not require their 
services. If the gentleman had a tree on his land 
with a dead limb on it, the time to cut it oft' 
is now, and not let it go till next year. 
The object of this order is to bring back 
to this City Government the control of city affairs 
that they had when the present charter was 
adopted in 1855, twenty-two years ago. It has 
been good enough for us to live under 
until within the last three years ; and ev- 
ery gentleman who has been a member 
of this Council, knows that within the last 
three years there has been a strong and powerful 
pressure upon us to pass special recommendations 
to the Mayor to petition the Legislature for cer- 
tain commissions. And for what purpose ? Why, 
sir, to give certain men positions from which we 
cannot remove them under some three years, and 
we cannot change their salaries; but they must be 
kept along, and we have no power over them unless 
we go to the Legislature and ask permission to 
abolish them. Now. sir, the present city charter 
is remarkable for simplicity and common sense; 



any schoolboy can understand it? and it gives the 
City Council absolute control of the manage- 
ment of city affairs. We have gone to the 
Legislature year after year with petitions 
and requests" for power to appoint boards 
and commissiones and give high salaries, 
so that our old charter is literally gone, and soon 
we shall have very little power left except to pass 
appropriations and assess the citizens for those 
appropriations. The word "commission" is only 
mentioned once in our city charter, and that is 
where it refers to the Board of Health, and where 
it gave us power to place that department under 
charge of a commission. The first commis- 
sion was established in 1846, when we in- 
troduced water into Boston, and I should like to 
call the Council's attention to the very careful 
manner in which that act was worded. In that 
act it expressly declared that when the Cochitu- 
ate works were completed the services of the 
commission were to come to an end; and then, in 
section 5, page 888, it says — 

"Whenever the said office of commissioners 
shall cease, either by the expiration of the said 
term of three years from the original appoint- 
ment, or by the completion of the aqueducts and 
works mentioned in the preceding sections of this 
act, all the rights, powers and authority given to 
the city of Boston by this act, shall be exercised 
by the said city, subject to all the duties, liabili- 
ties and restrictions herein contained, in such 
manner and by such agents, officers and servants 
as the City Council shall from time to time ordain, 
appoint and direct." 

So that in the year 1846 our city fathers were 
careful not to lose control of their power vested 
in them by the city charter. Well, the works were 
completed, and the services of the commission 
expired, and then we went on under a Joint 
Special Committee on Water, and had entire 
charge of the works, and nobody complain- 
ed that they had not been conducted 
properly and fairly, and they went on 
properly and right until we decided to intro- 
duce water from Sudbury River, and it was then 
proposed to appoint a commission to do that work. 
There were special orders introduced in the 
Council to authorize the Mayor to petition 
the Legislature to grant us power, but they 
were so hampered by amendments, such as 
the gentleman has proposed tonight, that the 
City Government looked upon it with such 
suspicion that they could not get a commis- 
sion then. And when it was found neces- 
sary to have some commission, they established 
what is now the Boston Water Board, under this 
old act of 1846; and under that old act of 1846 the 
present Water Board is now acting, and they have 
no further powers, for they are limited by this 
section 4. We can take their powers away 
whenever we choose to do so; and that 
is what we propose to do with all of 
the commissions, when their services expire 
and they are of no further use to the 
City Government, then is the time we do not want 
them. We do not want to pass a vote this year 
and then have the matter go to the people 'and 
have to send members back to the City Council to 
confirm that action. The people do r.ot send us here 
to do any such work as that. They send us here to 
use common sense and reason in passing orders, 
and they expect us to use good judgment. The 
gentleman gets up here and talks about abolishing 
commissions because a man does not wear a badge; 
such a remark as that is all nonsense. I believe 
that if such an order went to the Mayor he would 
veto it. Such kind of talk is all nonsense. Then, 
sir, in 1837, an act was passed establishing the 
Board of Directors for Public Institutions. Two 
years ago it was found out that that Board 
were employing criminals in the institu- 
tions upon sewing machines. Well, down 
at the North End tliey felt the effect of this sys- 
tem. Gentlemen connected with the North End 
Mission, a charitable institution in that section, 
came to the City Council and said that some other 
employment might be found for the ]iersons 
then working on sewing machines at the in- 
stitutions. The reason that they gave was 
that it was taking work out of the hands of 
poor women. There was no class of work 
that the women of the North End could 
do so well as I that. Well, sir, we appointed a 
committee to investigate the matter. Onr com- 
mittee waited upon the Directors of Public Insti- 
tutions, and were confronted by the fact that 
they were established by act of the Legislature, 
and were not working under a city ordinance. 



FEBRQARY 15, 187 7 



70 



They had the light from the authorities of 
the State to employ criminals as they 
pleased, and they put them to work on 
sewing machines. Well, we all know when a man 
comes out of a prison that lie does not work on a 
sewing machine, and the trade is of no use to him. 
Well, the parties, feeling very strenuous in this 
matter, went to the Legislature and tried to get 
an amendment to the law. What was the result? 
The directors went there, the petitioners failed, 
and it remains as it is now; and we have no con- 
trol over them, so far as the employment of erimi- 
inals is concerned. Now, sir, in regard to the 
Board of Street Commissioners, which was estab- 
lished in 1870, and the members of which are 
elected by the people to serve three years. What 
is the position in which you are in today? We 
have a committee who have talked pretty stren- 
uously upon retrenchment and reduction of sal- 
aries. In the- act granting the city of Boston 
power to appoint the Board of Street Commis- 
sioners, it reads that the commissioners 
shall each receive an annual salary ot not less 
than $3000. Now, the Legislature can reduce the 
salaries of all its employes, and they made a great 
deal of talk last year about reducing salaries and 
saving four or five thousand dollars; but we have 
three commissioners, with a salary of three thou- 
sand dollars each; and I presume that when 
this committee on retrenchment looked over 
the laws, they found that they had to 
come to a stop,, and they have no au- 
thority to reduce their salaries below ;$3000. Now, 
I think the power should remain in the hands of 
the City Council to do what they think best. If 
we do not propose to make any great improve- 
ments during the present year, perhaps their 
salaries will be too high; but we cannot re- 
duce their salaries below $3000, although we may 
raise them to $10,000. I do not think their salaries 
have been too high heretofore, but we have 
no control over them. Now, sir, in regard to the 
Registrars of Voters (page 238), section 16 reads 
that "they shall receive such annual compensa- 
tion as the City Council may from time to time de- 
termine; but any reduction of compensation shall 
take effect upon such registrars only as shall be 
appointed after such reduction." 

Consequently, I presume the Committee on Re- 
trenchment found, when they came to look upon 
this matter, that they could get hold of only one 
of those men; they could go for him, Imt the 
other two would still draw the same pay for 
the next two or three years. Well, it seems 
to me to be hard to take one man and 
reduce his salary two or three hundred 
dollars, and the others draw the same pay. We 
have been giving our powers away under those 
special acts of the Legislature, and I propose to 
go to the Legislature and get an act that will give 
us power to make commissions and abolish them 
when we see fit. I should like to call attention 
to the act of 1871 establishing the office of Inspect- 
or of Buildings : 

' There is hereby created in the city of Boston an 
executive department, to be known and designat- 
ed as the Department for the Survey and Inspec- 
tion of Buildings, which shall have charge of en- 
forcing the several i^rovisions of this act." 

Now, sir, I want to call attention to the fact 
that this is an executive department. Whoever 
went to the Legislature and lobbied that law 
through, got just what he wanted — an executive 
department, with a chief equal in power to the 
Governor, and with greater power than the Mayor. 
He can go on without any control from us what- 
ever, and if he chooses, he can condemn prop- 
erty, and can drag the city of Boston into a 
hundred lawsuits, to the extent of a million dol- 
lars. AVe have no control over him, and if we 
want to get hold of him, we mvist go to the Legis- 
lature and have the act modified. So far as we 
are a legislative body, we ought to have the whole 
power in our hands. Therefore, Mr. President, I 
think the idea of this amendment, that we may 
have power to create commissioners to- 
day, and shall not have power to abolish 
them, is not a good one. The gentleman thinks we 
have ability to create them, but not the ability to 
abolish them ; and so we must have two councils, 
with their great ability and experience, to say 
whether we shall undo next year what we have 
done this vear. 

Mr. Reed of Ward 17— The Joint Special Com- 
mittee on Salaries and Expenditures are already 
looking into this matter, and we have already 
under consideration a petition to the Legislature 
for certain rights which we do not now enjoy. 1 



therefore move that it be referred to the Joint 
Special Committee on Salaries and Expenditures. 

Mr. Clarke of Ward 22—1 cio not see that they 
have anything to do with it. This is a matter that 
appeals "to the common sense of the Council; and 
I would inform the gentleman that I don't object to 
the reference at all, for I do not propose to be cap- 
tious, and should be glad to have it go to the com- 
mittee and let them take all the time they please. 
But it we want to get this authority, it has got to 
pass both branches of the City Council, and be 
signed by the Mayor by the first of March. We 
have no time to spare. This matter was intro- 
duced last year on Dec. 7, and referred with other 
matteis to this City Government. The Committee 
on New City Charter reported an order similar to 
this, and I give the gentleman offering the amend- 
ment credit for it a s chairman of the committee ; but 
it being the last month of the year, the Council 
had no time to consider it, and it was put over 
till this year. If it is going to be acted upon this 
year it must be passed now, as it must be acted 
ijpon by the Board of Aldermen and go to the 
Legislature within the time limited by them. 

Mr. Thomp.son ot Ward 9 — The question raised 
by this order is so important that I think a few- 
minutes can be well spent in discussing it. It 
seems to me that the question is not a political 
one, for, if I understand it, this is not a political 
body. The city does not constitute a true politi- 
cal unit ; but it is a business corporation. We stand 
not as representatives of the political opinions of 
the inhabitants of the city, but as trustees dele- 
gated to attend to the bvisiness interests of the 
city. The question presented by this order is one 
of administration It is in substance. How shall 
the business of the city be best managed ? And 
the experience of other bodies, where large sums 
of money have to be handled, and important busi- 
ness transacted, tends to show that we must select 
and employ skilled men for the management 
of our business affairs. The old system of man- 
agement under fluctuating committees of this 
ever-changing body— the City Council— presents as 
perfect an example of power without responsibil- 
ity as can be conceived of. If any one outside 
of the City Council should be asked tomorrow 
who compose the committees on Common, 
East Boston Ferries, or several other important 
committees, they would not know. They do 
know when some important measure is carried 
out; it may suit them and it may not, but unless 
they take the trouble to come to the City Hall 
and hunt out who is responsible for it, they will 
not know. In a small city or town a body like this 
may do very well, because all the members who 
compose a committee are probably known 
to every person in the town; in this body 
we are known to our immediate circle, and no 
more. These arguments are in favor of a govern- 
ment by some settled body— call them heads of de- 
partments, commissions or what you please, so 
that vou have an independent body of men who 
have power and are responsible, and to whom you 
can look if anything bad is done. The question 
before us is, How shall the disposition of 
city affairs be distributed ? Shall it be retained in 
this body, or shall it be vested in commissions who 
are always, to a great extent, under the control ot 
this Council, but who shall be made, to a certain 
extent, independent of It. Now, it seems to 
me that the importance of their being inde- 
pendentis this, that their action will be more free. 
Take the heads of aepartments ; every year their 
election comes round, and there is a scramble for 
office at the commencement of the year. In- 
deed, there have been so many people here that 
an alderman introduced an order to put some of 
them out of the building. Those officers know 
that there is a power coming here that will have 
an influence upon members of the Council. It 
was stated here the other evening that mem- 
bers of the Council went to the head of a depart- 
ment, and each asked for employment for his 
three men. What indt;pendence can the head 
of a department have, if members can go to him 
and say. If you do not do thus and so, I will 
vote against you? I do not believe that many 
Councilmen do it, but there is danger of it. I 
believe that the interest of the city, in the elec- 
tion of its officers, will be advanced by this meas- 
ure. I support the order in part because I want 
to see the City Council have power to create com- 
missions whenever they see a necessity for then], 
and I do not believe they will ever be in too great 
a hurry to do so, and when the time 
comes to delegate their power it is well tliat they 
should have authority to do so. When .the time 



77 



COM. MOJSr COUNCIL 



comes for any of the commissions to pass away, 
tlie power should also lie in the same body to 
change them, or to assign them to different du- 
ties, and therefore I shall vote for authority to act 
in this matter. But I believe that this 
power requires a different limitation. I do 
not believe it is safe for uS to receive 
these two powers under the same limitation. 
When we delegate powers, there is a constant 
temptation to take them back. The arguments of 
the gentlemen show that they have not in- 
troduced this order to create commissions, but 
to destroy those already created. There are two 
classes of danger: First, there is the political 
danger; it may be deemed necessary to destroy 
a department for political reasons. A City Gov- 
ernment, fresh from an exciting contest, uiay be 
moved to destroy some valuable commission; and 
by this order that power can be exercised at 
once. What would be the difference in that case 
between commissions and our heads of de- 
partments? They know that in carrying 
out a necessary but unpleasant duty^ they 
will incur the enmity of" a body that can 
remove them. We all desire a form of 
government that will administer the business 
of the city well. You go to a mercantile estab- 
lishment, and you find men selected for their pe- 
culiar qualifications, who know that their interest 
lies in protecting the interest of their employers. 
Men ought to know that their places will be sure 
to them so long as they do their duty. If 
we compare the salaries paid by the General 
Government with those paid by cities, we 
find that those paid by cities are smaller. Why? 
It is because of the feeling of permanence. They 
pass through the routine of service, and become 
of great value to the country, aijd yet receive 
comnaratively small salaries. And why? Be- 
cause they know that so long as their behavior 
is what it should be their pay is fixed. Now, what 
we want to Drin§ into this City Government is 
that kind of feeling; to make a man honest be- 
cause he belongs to the City Government. 1 hope 
to see the day that men will feel proud of be- 
ing officers of the City Government; and 
that that fact will be a reason why they 
will take less salary. That is my argument 
why these commissions should be permanent. 
What does the order, as originally introduced, 
propose to do? It is that by the vote of two 
bodies, meeting within four days of each other, any 
commission can be destroyed. If any idea of per- 
manence exists in the order, I cannot see it. The 
amendment does not go so far as I should like to 
see it; but perhaps it is far enough. It 
sends the question back to the corporators 
whom we represent. If they decide to send back 
representatives in favor of passing the order, 
then it can be done. No great delay is asked. If 
we pass the order with this addition we can send 
it to the Legislature with some hope that the act 
will be passed. But suppose you send it to 
the Legislature in its present condition. 
You cannot expect that a political body 
like the Legislature will give us an 
exceptional power such as we are now asking, and 
which is not to be applied to other cities of the 
Commonwealth. We must show substantial rea- 
sons for it. We say we have a large business here, 
and want to provide a body to administer it 
propei'ly; that we want something more per- 
manent and resijonsible, and ask for power to 
create commissions. But we may also 
know that, when we have created them, the 
contingency may pass away, and we also ask that 
the power to abolish them may be given us. The 
Legislature will see that the two powers are so 
entirely difflerent that they should be given under 
different limitations. I think that, on the whole, 
the amendment will be fairly acceptable. If 
we refuse to adopt the amendment, in what 
position do we place ourselves ? It shows 
that this is not asked for with the inten- 
tion of changing this . form of government to 
more permanent conditions ; but we show that we 
ask for it in order to change such commissions as 
we have now ; and the Legislature might not 
grant it. They would say that we should act on 
broader reasons in creating a Board of Chari- 
ties, the Fire Commission and Registrars of 
Voters. Those are questions that affect the 
interest of the city, and I think that in acting 
upon this weighty matter — the most weighty that 
will coine before this body this year, I think— we 
should proceed with great deliberation, and not 
be moved by hasty or careless views. We should 
try to discover the principle upon which the Legis- 



lature might act if we ask it to give us this, and 
consider well what those principles are, and not 
be carried away by hasty or passing ideas. I hope 
the amendment will pervail, and if it does I hope 
the order will pass; for if it does not, I certainly 
could not give my vote for the order without it. 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 5 — The gentleman from 
Ward 9 [Mr. Thompson] has given us an able 
speech upon his theory of the «,ity Government. 
Let us look back and see what we have been, 
where we are, and what conclusion we have come 
to. Our first charter was written by Judge Shaw, 
Harrison Gray Otis and the elder Quincy; bet- 
ter men never lived, and they will com- 
pare favorably in ability and knowledge 
with the rest' of Massaciiusetts. We went 
on for fifty years under that plan of city govern- 
ment, with some alterations; but the plan gener- 
ally was very good. The years liave come and 
gone. We had the smallpox, a bad ;5courge ; and 
we wanted a Board of Health. I have not a word 
of fault to find, or a word to say against the gen- 
tlemen that have composed that board, and this is 
the third year I have served on the Health 
Committee. I believe they are doing a 
great work ; I believe the Board is 
useful, and I believe they are doing their work 
well. Then the great tire came. I know it burnt 
me out and all the business I had. Before the 
lire I had a hundred customers to do teaming for; 
but not one had a store fifteen hours after 
the fire started. It took away the accumu- 
lations of fifteen years. People thought something 
was wrong. I believe the Fire Commission has 
been successful : I believe it has been a good 
thing. We went on a };ear. Tlien came the Wa- 
ter Board. I talked with every member of the 
Mystic and Cochituate water boards, and I only 
found one man who thought there should not be a 
change. There is but one section in the act 
that I do not like, and that is, you cannot 
change the amount of their salaries while 
in office. I don't know -that they get 
any too much, but I do know that any commis- 
sioner is a high-priced article, and I don't care 
whether you call him a commissioner or not, if he 
performs the duty he is worth the money. But 
the question is. Shall we go to the Legislature to 
get this power? I cannot see the use ©f it. Two- 
thirds of the City Council^can put on every one of 
those men, and the Mayor can remove them 
for cause. They are created by ordi- 
nance. If we repeal the ordinances or 
do not vote them any money, they must stop. I 
am sure that what creates can destroy, I am not 
a lawyer, but it seems to me that that ought to be 
good law. Now, about this being a commission, 
and that political interest, and this political 
dodge. I don't suppose that we propose to be very 
bad. When I came here from the. State of Ver- 
mont I did not expect to be a member of this 
great and glorious Council. I was honest when I 
came in here, and I hope I always will be; but I 
must say that I have learned something. We have 
put several departments tinder commissions. 
They had them in Philadelphia and New York, 
where they were not appointed, but elect- 
ed, and I am sure I have read about 
something being wrong in New York. It 
is only a questicm as to what men you 
get, and it is all right if the men are honest. We 
have to ask a few questions, and vote for or 
against them. I dislike the amendment worse 
than I do the order, for I don't believe it takes 
but two sessions of the Legislature to change 
the constitution of Massachusetts. I think that the 
City Government might possibly handle this mat- 
ter. Some gentlemen favor changing the duties of 
some of the departments, for instance, the Street 
Commissioners) We are not building many new 
streets, unless it be a public thoroughfare. It 
would have to be shown to be a great necessity 
before I would vote for it in these times. But I 
don't know how to get at it, and I move to lay it 
on the table. 

Mr. Ruttin— I hope the order will not be laid 
upon the table, because I think, as has been said, 
that it is a very important matter, and one which 
we have got to meet; and we might just as well 
meet it and discuss it now as at any other time. I 
think we ought to discuss it to that extent that 
we can understand it thoroughly and be prepared 
to vote intelligently upon it. This order 
ought to pass. We ought to have the 
Ijower to create these commissions, but 
with certain limitations. I think it should be lim- 
ited as set forth in the original order, for reasons 
which I have already given, for I think they are 



FEBRUARY IS), 185^7 



78: 



wise and judicious. It we have power to make 
these commissions, we should have power to un- 
make them. The same wisdom which creates 
commissions will, it is supposed, be used in un- 
making- them, if it is necessary. I can 
see no possible imaginary, no imaginary clif- 
flculties attending it. I do not believe the trou- 
bles would follow which some gentlemen seem to 
believe. We have had excited political contests 
heretofore, and quite as excited as will be seen 
hereafter; and yet I have never seen any great 
changes in the City Government. We have offi- 
cers who have remained here all their lives, and 
have passed through all the political changes. 
Parties «ome and parties go; but the offi- 
cials remain here. We have had political discus- 
sions; and political excitement has run as high as 
it will run in years to come; and still I have never 
seen this unseemly partisan feeling about the re- 
moval of officials from City Hall; and I do not 
think we shall have it when we remove the 
commissions. I think there is good sense 
and judiciousness in both parties, and they 
will not commit suicide in such a foolish 
manner as that, and they will not upset a depart- 
ment of the Government unless there is reason 
for it. I see a necessity for having this power in 
the hands of the City Government. I think we 
want some other qualities in those commissions 
besides independence. I don't believe in making 
them independent of the City Government. 
They mieht be so independent that nobody 
could reach them, and so permanent that they 
could not be removed when they became obnox- 
ious or inefficient. What we want is efficiency; 
and I think this order will give it. We want men 
to do the special duties assigned them— not mere- 
ly independence and permanency, but efficiency. 

Mr. Clarke — In my remarks upon the Inspector 
of Buildings I omitted to state a very important 
matter the appointment of the chief officer of 
that department. Section 12, page 91, says — 

"The chief officer of the said Department for 
the Survey and Inspection of Buildings shall be 
called the Inspector of Buildings. He shall be ap- 
pointed by the Mayor, and contii-med by the City 
Council. He shall hold office for the term of three 
years, or until his successor shall take office, but 
may be sooner removed by the City Council for 
malfeasance, incapacity or neglect of duty." 

In the other commissions we have power to re- 
move them if they are obnoxious ; but we cannot 
remove this officer unless we can ascertain that 
he is malfeasant, incapable, or has neglected his 
duty. Now, sir, who is to judge whether he is or 
not? How are you going to do that? The City 
Council have not authority to draw the line. He 
may take exception to our opinion and go 
to the Supreme Court, and it may be three 
or four years before it is decided whether he is the 
right man or not. It seems to me that all our 
powers have been taken away, so far as that de- 
partment is concerned. I introduced an order 
three or four weeks ago, which was referred to 
the Committee on Retrenchment, in regard to 
establishing a Department on Supplies. Now, sir, 
if such a department is established, instead 
of taking twelve and a half cents a day 
from the poor clerks, and making them 
reduce their expenses that amount. I say this 
Council can save $200,000 a year. But the ques- 
tion is, how can it be carried out, except by a 
commission? If you put this matter oft', we can- 
not go to the Legislature with it until next year. 
This order is in the interest of economy. We are 
keeping at the State House a gentleman connect- 
ed with the City Solicitor's Department, at 
the rate of §.3000 a year, to advocate all 
our petitions before the Legislature. If we 
have this power, we need not send to the Legisla- 
ture so often, and will save two or three thousand 
dollars in that direction. 

The motion to lay on the table was declared car- 
ried. Mr. Pope of Ward 14 doubted the vote, and 
on motion of Mr. Ruffin the yeas and nays were 
ordered. The motion was lost— yeas 19, nays 45. 

Yeas— Messrs. Barnard, Barry, Beeching,'Browu, 
Dav, Duggan,D. A. Flynn, Ham, Hibbard, His- 
cock, Howes, Jackson, McDonald, ,1. H. Pierce, O. 
H. Pierce, Roberts, Sibley, G. B. AVebster— 18. 

Nays— Messrs. Brintnall, Burke, Cannon, Clarke, 
Coe, Cox, Crocker, Cross, Danforth, Dee, Dohei- 
ty, Fagan, Felt, Fernald, J. J. Flynn, Fraser, Kel- 
ley (Ward 3), Kelley (Ward 0), Kidney, Louglilin, 
McClusky, Morrill, Mowry, MuUape, Nugent, 
O'Connor, O'Donnell, Perham, Pope, Pratt, Reed, 
J.B.Richardson, Roach, Ruffin, Shepard, Smai- 
don. Souther, Speuceley, Stone, Thompson, Thorn- 



dike, Vose, Warren., E..R., Webster, Wilburj Wol- 
oott— 45. . 

Absent or ngt Voting —.Messrs. Blanchard, 
Blodgett, McGaragle, Pearl, M. W. Richardson, 
Sampson, Upham — 7. 

The question was on the reference to the Com- 
mittee on Salaries and Expenditures. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 13— I hope that motion will 
not prevail, for the reason that if the order is pre- 
sented to the Legislature at all it must be done by 
next Thursday, the last day for receiving peti- 
tions. 

The motion to refer was lost, and the question 
was on Mr. Crocker's amendment. 

Mr. Pierce of Ward 24 — There is one argument 
in favor of this amendment which has not been 
touched upon, but it seems to have been admitted 
by all who have spoken against it— that there 
are certain commissions which are impor- 
tant. If that is the case, and furthermore 
I do not doubt but any business will be put 
into commissions but what is important ; and that 
being the fact it seems to me equally important 
that we should have the best men that can be ob- 
tained for those positions; and if we need such 
men I think we should not be in a fair way to ob- 
tain the services of some such men if they are lia- 
ble to lose their positions at a v/eek's notice,whicli 
will be the case if this order is passed ; while, 
if the amendment is adopted, of course it 
will be otherwise. The gentleman from 
Wartl 9 [Mr. Ruffin] said he thought the nearer we 
got to the people the better; and it seems to me 
that is an excellent argument for the amendment. 
We come here as representatives of the people ; 
but we cannot always be supposed to know the 
views of our constituents ; and we may consider 
that they are different from what they actually 
are. In such an important matter as the chang- 
ing of commissions, it seems to me the people 
should vote directly upon it before the com- 
mission is abolished. If the matter is 
brought up and acted upon one year, then the 
people will have an opportunity to vote upon it, 
and express their opinion in some form by elect- 
ing a Council that will carry out their views. The 
amendment does not clash in any way with what 
is desirable in the matter of salaries, which will 
still be left in the hands of the City Council. We 
can reduce or raise them, or stop them altogether, 
which would practically abolish the commis- 
sion, unless the gentlemen were public spirited 
enough to serve without pay, feeling that such a 
vote was contrary to the wishes of the people. 
Therefore I think the amendment will do no harm 
and may do a great deal of good. 

The question was put on Mr. Crocker's amend- 
ment. The President was in doubt. Mr. Pierce 
of Ward 24 called for the yeas and nays, which 
were ordered. The amendment was lost — yeas 23, 
nays 41 : 

Yeas— Messrs. Barnard, Beeching, Brown, Coe, 
Cox, Crocker, Danforth, Felt, Ham, Hibbard, His- 
cock, Howes, Mowry, Perham, J. H. Pierce, 
O. H. Pierce, t^ratt, Roberts, Shepard, Smardon, 
Thompson, Thorndike, Wolcott— 23. 

Nays — Messrs. Barry, Brintnall, Burke, Cannon, 
Clarke, Cross, Day, Dee, Doherty, Duggan, Fagan, 
Fernald, D. A. Flynn, J. J. Flynn, Fraser, Jack- 
son, Kelley (Ward 3), Kelley '(Ward 6), Kidney, 
Louglilin, McClusky, McDonald, Morrill, MuUane, 
Nugent, O'Connor, O'Donnell, Pope, Reed, J. B. 
Richardson, Roach, Ruffin, Sibley, Souther, Spen- 
celey, Stone, Vose, Warren, E. R. Webster, G. B. 
Webster, Wilbur— 41. 

Absent or not voting — Messrs. Blanchard, Blod- 
gett, McGaragle, Pearl, M. W. Richardson, Samp- 
son, Upham — 7. 

Mr. Howes— It seems to me that if the order 
goes before the Legislature in its present shape it 
will seem as if there were a determination on the 
part of the present Council to do away with the 
present commissions. That is the view of it which 
members of the Legislature will probably be likely 
to take, whether it is correct or not. In order to 
correct this view, and that gentlemen who are so 
democratic in their ideas may show that such is not 
their intention, I move to" amend the order by 
adding, after the word "thereof," the words "and 
by a popular vote of the citizens, duly qualified, of 
this city." 

Mr. Ruffin— I do not know who in this body has 
authority to speak for the Legislature. I cannot 
gather that the Legislature will come to that con- 
clusion from anything in the order, and I think 
that any member's perception must be very keen 
who does gather that idea. The position t have 
taken in this matter has been in good faith. I 



79 



COMMON OOXJ ISTCIJL. 



think the proposition a good one. It is the view 
I have held for some time, since I have 
given the subject any examination. I think 
the commissions very desirable and if we are go- 
ing to have them I think this is the better way to 
pursue. I think the Legislature would see that 
also. This is not conferring new power upon the 
City Council. The power is already with them, 
only it is exercised in a different way. We only 
ask for a different mode of exercising that power. 
This is no extraordinary thing. I may not be 
in a position to see what is the un- 
der-current of those who are the pro- 
jectors of this movement; but from the stand- 
point that I view it I see nothing hut good. I 
have an idea that commissions are favorably 
looked upon by a large majority of the thinking 
people of the city of "Boston. It is something they 
have been aiming at a long time. They have been 
brooding over it and devising schemes for a new 
city charter, by which we might have this 
power. Now, the question comes as it is present- 
ed to us tonight, {jentlemen favoring the order 
are not prepared to take this step. It is nothing- 
new. I see no cat in the meal, and if anybody 
does, I hope he will expose it, so that we may all 
see it. I am satisfied that if this matter is pressed 
in any way before the Legislature, they will see it 
as the majority of this Council see it. 

Mr. Howes— I have no wish to impute wrong 
motives to any member, especially to the gentle- 
man last up. My reason is, that a yea and nay 
vote has just been taken, and members who have 
heretofore voted in opposition to commissions are 
now anxious to establish them. I am at 
a loss to understand this conversion, which 
is quite as sudden as that of St. Paul. The only 
reason I can see is that the jiresent commissions 
are to be done away with at any time. I hope the 
amendment I have offered will prevail. If mem- 
bers are desirous of having it done in a demo- 
cratic way it can be done so. 

Mr. Fly'nn of Ward 13— The gentleman says that 
members who have heretofore voted against com- 
missions are now voting for them. 

Mr. Howes— I meant the members of the last 
Council. 



Mr. Flynn — He did not say that. We have never 
voted in this Council on that question before. 

Mr. Clarke— The gentleman says those who 
voted against commissions are now voting for 
them; and as he looked at me I suppose he meant 
me. I have done so because the orders were so 
hampered by such amendments as the gentle- 
man from Ward 9 proijosed, that they could 
not be abolished without a two-thirds vote. 
I shall never vote for such a commission. 

On motion of Mr. Sibley, the main question was 
ordered. 

Mr. Howes's amendment was lost. 

The order was read a second time, and Mr. Pratt 
of Ward 21 moved the yeas and nays on its pas- 
sage, which were not ordered (a division being- 
called for OD a doubt raised bv Mr. Flynn of Ward 
13)— 11 for, -16 against. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 13 moved a suspension of 
the rule, which was carried— 41 for, 17 against. 

Mr. Flynn moved a reconsideration. Lost. 
Sent up. 

ADJ0UHKJIE3ST. 

On motion of Mr. Howes of Ward 18 it was or- 
dered that when the Council adjourn it be to Fri- 
day evening, Feb. 23, at 7% o'clock P. M. 

PETITIONS PKBSENTED. 

By Mr. Ruflin of Ward 9— Petition of Bridget 
Griffin tor compensation for injuries on Charles 
street. Referred to Committee on Claims. 

Petition of James Fitzgerald for change in bond 
given for land. Referred to Committee on Pub- 
lic Lands. 

Severally sent up. 

Mr. Shepard of Ward 4 offered an order— That 
the Committee on Public Buildings be authorized 
to provide the requisite furniture for the new 
grammar schoolhouse, Florence District, West 
Roxbury, the cost not exceeding the sum of $2000; 
the expense thereof to be charged to the ap- 
propriation for Schoolhouses, Public Buildings. 

Ordered to a second reading. 

Adjourned on motion of Mr. Duggan of Ward 12. 



80 



BOARL> OF ALDERMEN 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceeding's of the Board of Aldermen, 

FEBRUARY 19, 1877. 



Regular meeting at four o'clock P. M., the Mayor 
presiding. 

EXBCUriVE NOMINATIONS. 

Police Officers Without Pay— George R. Rich- 
ards, Freeman's National Bank; Manus McLauth- 
lin, Woodward avenue; Daniel Cowan, Howard 
Athenaeum. 

Police Officer— Patrick Lee. 

Weighers ot Coal— John Kelly, Jr., and G. P. 
Dodge. 

PETITIONS HEFBBBED. 

To the Joint Conitnittee on the Survey and In- 
spection of Bvildings. B. & F. H. Jenney, for 
leave to erect a wooden building situated on West 
First street, corner D street. South Boston. 

To the Jotnt Committee on Assessors' Depart^ 
ment. S. W. Richardson, for abatement and re- 
mission of taxes on estate of the late William 
Richardson. 

To the Joint Committee on Streets. T. F. Burns, 
for leave to occupy a portion of laud at corner of 
Eliot and Pleasant streets for sale of fruit, etc. 

To the Committee on Ptiblic Baths. John F. 
Newton et at., for a bath house at Roxbury. 

To the Committee on Streets on the part of the 
Board. Catherine Dolan, to be repaid for land 
taken on Porter and Jess streets, Roxbury. 

To the Committee on Licenses. L. J. Jordan, 
M. D., for leave to open a gallery of anatomy in 
this city. 

To the Committee on Health on the part of the 
Board. Petitions for leave to occupy stables by 
Louis M. Mahn, new wooden, three horses, Lamar- 
tine street, Ward 23; Michael Kenny, new wooden, 
one horse, corner Bennett and Market streets. 
Ward 25 ; George W. Parker, new brick, three 
horses, Olive place, Ward 17. 

To the Joint Committee on Claims. Sarah Ross, 
to be compensated for personal injuries caused by 
a fall in Lincoln street. 

To the Committee on Paving. Clement Willis 
et al. for the repaying of Washington street from 
Chester park to the old Roxbury line; J. S. Nick- 
erson et al., that Fourth street, between E and F 
streets, be paved with granite blocks ; Pratt & Co. 
et al., that Neponset avenue and Terrace street be 
put in condition for travel. 

Metropolitan Railroad Company, for leave to 
construct a track on Atlantic avenue from tracks 
already located near Rowe's wharf through Atlaii- 
tic avenue and Commercial street, to connect with 
tracks on Hanover street, with suitable curves 
and connections. Also, for a location of track 
across Dover street, to connect those already con- 
structed on Harrison avenue, and for convenient 
turnouts on Harrison avenue between Dover and 
Warren streets, with curve tracks at the corner of 
Dover street and Harrison avenue, and Dover and 
Washington streets. 

N. W. DAY'S OMNIBUS ROUTE. 

The order granting leave to N. W. Day to run 
coaches from Cambridge Bi'idge through Cam- 
bridge street, Bowdoin square, Green, Chambers 
and Cambridge streets, to Cambridge Bridge, was 
considered under uniinished business. 

Alderman Viles — I move that the oraer be laid 
on the table until the Union Railroad Company 
have had a chance to be heard. 

The motion prevailed. 

Alderman Fitzgerald — This petition was re- 
ferred to the Committee on Licenses ; the Union 
Railroad appeared by counsel and had its wit- 
nesses — as did Mr. Day also. Mr. Day asked for a 
route through Court street down to State street. 
Both sides were heard, and we made the report 
which is now upon the table. Why the Union 
Railroad ask for a hearing after that I do not 
know, and am at a loss to discover. 

Alderman Viles— I have a document here which 
has just been handed to me and which I will ask 
the Chair to read. 

The Chair read the paper, representing that Mr. 
Day was heard before the Committee on Licenses 
on his petition to extend his route through Cam- 
bridge and Court streets. The Union Railroad 
Company appeared as a remonstrant against Mr. 
Day's coaches running over their coaches' route 
and especially through Cambridge streets and 



Bowdoin square and Green street. Both parties 
appeared with counsel and witnesses. The re- 
monstrants proposed and attempted to prove the 
impolicy of allowing the petitioners to run through 
Cambridge street and Court street on ac- 
count of the crowded and blocked condition 
of the streets; but upon inquiries being 
made, counsel for Mr. Day said the remonstrants 
need not go into that; that Mr. Day would not 
press for a license to use those streets; that all he 
wanted was to get to State street in some way, 
and that the committee might give him some 
route not petitioned for. Mr. Day having aban- 
doned his petition, the remonstrants ofEered no 
evidence touching those streets. The remon- 
strants supposed the committee would not grant 
permission to Mr. Day to use the streets which he 
proposed without having heard evidence which 
the remonstrants had to offer in relation to the 
crowded condition of those streets. The substance 
of the evidence at the hearing was ohis: First, Day 
had run from Cambridge street to Green street; 
he had run two coaches ; the business paid ; begins 
running at eVj A. M., and ceases at 614 P- M. ; runs 
when travel is best, and takes the cream of the 
business, and does not run when travel is light; 
runs to make money and not to accommodate the 
public. Second, the Union Railroad Company 
runs from Jialf-past five till midnight, whether it 
pays or not ; runs many miles of road that do not 
pay; the best part of their lines is that over which 
Day proposes to run ; there is no complaint that 
the Union Railroad fails in any manner to accom- 
modate the public ; there is no petition in favor of 
Day's line. 

Alderman Fitzgerald — Whose name is signed to 
that document ? 

The Mayor — It has no signature. 

Alderman Fitzgerald — It is very unfair for any 
member of the Board to present a" document stat- 
ing what occurred at a meeting of a committee 
without its being signed by somebody. It is an 
unfair way of getting it before the Board. 

Alderman Viles — That was handed to me by the 
counsel for the Union Railroad, who asked to have 
a hearing before the Committee on Licenses last 
year, of which I had the honor to be a member, 
and we gave the subject four hearings, and were 
unanimous that the public do not need the coaches 
he proposed to run. He came from Saco, Me., 
with two coaches, and wanted to put them on the 
best route for passengers. The committee were 
unanimous in giving him leave to withdraw. Now, 
all that the railroad company ask is thirty minutes 
before the Board, and I guarantee that they will 
not take more than that time. 

.\lderman Fitzgerald — I have no objection to 
hearing the Union Railroad, but I think Mr. Day 
ought to have a chance to be heard also. He has 
two omnibuses and is not going to swallow tlie 
Union Railroad. If there is to be a hearing 1 hope 
Mr. Day will be notified. 

Alderman Viles — I have no objections to his be- 
ing heard. 

Alderman Fitzgerald— I move that both parties 
be notified that they will be heard. 

The motion to hear both parties prevailed. 

DUTIES OF HARBOR MASTER. 

The order to accept chapter 64 of the act of 1862 
to invest the Harbor Master with police powers 
and duties, was considered under unfinished busi- 
ness, and passed. 

Later in the session the matter was called up by 
Alderman Robinson,who said that he was momen- 
tarily absent when the order was passed; that he 
had not time to look into the matter and desired 
an opportunity to do so. On his motion the vote 
whereby the order was passed was reconsidered, 
and the order was laid on the table. 

SINKING FUNDS. 

The ordinance to amena ordinance in relation to 
finance, so that unexpended balances at the close 
of the financial year shall be carried over to the 
credit of the several appropriations for the next 
financial year, was considered under unfinished 
business. ' 

Alderman Clark— This is quite an important 
matter, and contemplates quite a change in the 
method of conducting the Sinking Funds and the 
provisions for paying the debt of the city. I hope 
it will not be acted upon hastily, and I move that 
it be referred to the Committee on Finance. 

Alderman Fitzgerald — This ordinance was re- 
ported by the Committee on Retrenchment. 
While I do not yield to the Alderman opposite in 
my desire to see the credit of the city of Boston, 
both at home and abroad, maintained up t& that 



FEBRUARY 19, 1877 



8L 



standard which it has attained; wlnle the other 
members of the committee who have acted with 
me think as I do about the credit ot the city ot 
Boston, and are jealous of it, yet, after mature 
deliberation, they have come to the conclusion 
that the unexpended balances, for this year 
at least, and for some time to come, in- 
stead of being turned into the Sinking Fund, 
should be turned into the treasury, and be part 
and parcel of the next year's appropriations, so 
that so much shall be deduetefl from the tax levy 
of the succeeding year. This commission was 
created, 1 believe, some time in December, 1870, 
and up to now very few persons have understood 
the operations of the Sinking Funds. After spend- 
ing some four or five hours in the Treasurer's De- 
partment, looking over the amount of our indebt- 
edness, I have here a list of the indebtednesses of 
the citv of Boston ; the amount paid into tl.e Sink- 
ing Funds; the amount of matured debt which 
has been paid bv the Sinking Fund Commission- 
ers—in my judgment unnecessarily— for what pur- 
pose and for what object I do not know. But the 
taxpayers do not see that it is a direct tax on them 
of one per cent, each year for so much 
of the debt which has become matured. The 
whole indebtedness of the city on the first 
of January, 1877. was $44,656,672.30 ; on the same 
date in the Sinking Funds were bonds to the 
amount of ^1.3,370,670, and cash to the amount of 
§2,364,964.49 deposited in bank to the credit of the 
Sinking Fund Commissioners, and drawing four 
per cent., so that tne total amount of cash and 
bonds in the hands of the Sinking Fund Commis- 
sioners was §15.735,639.49, leaving a net outstand- 
ing debt on the 31st day of January last of $31,- 
286,997.30. During the last year the Sinking Fund 
Commissioners received from the Treasurer, from 
April 30, 1876, to Feb. 4, 1877— the same being reve- 
nue from betterments, sales ot public lands, liq- 
uor licenses, sewer assessments— $725,141. They 
have received from the interest on the 
bonds which they hold, and which is paid 
to them as it is paid to private individuals who 
hold the bonds of the city of Boston, from 
April 30, 1876, to Jan. 31, 1877, the sum of $552,680. 
The amount which they will receive in April will 
be $275,000. The amount which they will receive 
from the cash deposited to their credit from April 
30, 1876, to Feb. 4, 1877, is $39,643.34. The interest 
due them up to April 30, 1877, on the same amount 
of cash, we will say, is about $15,000, and an addi- 
tional amount from revenue for betterments up 
to the 17th of February, $31,483.18; and the addi- 
tional revenue up to the end of the year cannot 
fall short of $70,000. So that the Sinking Fund 
Commissioners on the 30th day of April, 1877, will 
have received and paid to them as interest, and 
also to help pay the debts at maturity, the sum of 
$1,708,948.35; and if the unexpended balances go 
in with that, it will amount to the sum of $2,500,000 
in round numbers. Last year the Sinking Fund 
Commissioners received from the same sources 
that I have enumerated here, and from unexpend- 
ed balances, the sum of $2,996,544.66. Now, last 
year the Sinking Fund Commissioners paid or 
cancelled, or bought in, $539,000 of their own bonds 
which had twenty years to run, so that the people 
of Boston were taxed 100 per cent, upon those 
bonds which there was no need of being taxed for 
at all for the next ten or fifteen years. Now, 
the whole amount of bonds which the Sinking 
Fund Commissioners have bought and cancelled, 
and the amount of debt paid before maturity, 
since the organization of the commission in 1870, 
is $2,223,072.92. an average of $370,512 in each year 
most of which would have been necessary to meet 
the debt when it became due in the years 
1890 and 1895. Why the Sinking Fund Com- 
missioners have done this I know not, but 
this 1 know, that whatever this Board, whatever 
this City Government can do to lighten the bur- 
dens of the people who own real estate and pay 
taxes, should be done, without at the same time 
destroying the credit of the city of Boston. Now, 
sir, to my point. The committee hold that the 
amount of interest which is paid to the Sinking 
Fund Commissioners on the bonds of the city of 
Boston, which they hold, the revenue which they 
will receive during the whole of next year from 
betterments, liquor licenses, sewers, paving, and 
other things of that kind, will be more than suf- 
ficient to meet all the needs of the Sinking Fund 
Commissioners, and to provide the necessary 
amount to pav the debts of the city of Boston at 
maturity. I liave here a tabular statement of the 
indebtedness of the city of Boston, based 
on the supposition that the city of Bos- 



ton will contract no more debts; the time 
when the bonds become due. the amount 
which should be paid each year to meet the inter- - 
est on the outstanding debts and to meet the 
bonds at maturity. On the 30th of April, 1877, the 
debt will be $30,618,406.70. Eight hundred thou- 
sand dollars of the bonds will be bought in by the 
Sinking Fund Commissioners in the months of 
March and April, and it will be bought by cash, 
amounting to $865,740 bonds will be payable ; and 
in order to meet that, and to meet the amount 
which tney are authorized to raise by statute, it 
will be necessary to raise $3,909,850 this next year. 
In 1878 it will be necessary to raise $2,918,423, with 
bonds maturing to the amount of $936,000, and the 
debt lowered to $29,682,406. In 1879 the debt will 
be $28,419,701, with $1,262,705 in bonds pay- 
able, and $2,331,788 in cash to meet them. 
In 1880, the debt will be $24,737,401.70, 
with bonds maturing to the amount of $3,682,300, 
and the amount required to be added to the Sink- 
ing Fund that year, to meet that obligation, will 
he $1,219,419; and so I go along down to the year 

1896. AS you will notice, sir, the amount neces- 
sary to be paid to the Sinking Fund Commission- 
ers decreases year by year, as the debt decreases, 
until, in 1895, the amount paid to the Sinking 
Fund Commissioners will be $189,034. In 1896 
nothing will be payable to the commissioners; in 

1897, nothing; in 1898, nothing; in 1899, nothing; in 
1900, $3,516,586 in bonds will become due and 
$108,190 will have to be paid in; in 
1891, nothing, the debt being only six mil- 
lions and some odd hundred thousand dollars. 
In 1902 the debt will be $6,582,715, but no bonds 
will become due; in 1903 the debt will be $3,766,- 
000, $2,816,711 bonds will become due, and only 
$55,715 will have to be paid into the sinking funds, 
they having already made provision for the pay- 
ment of it. And so on down to 1907, when the last 
outstanding bonds of the city of Boston will be 
payable into the treasury, and nothing will have 
to be paid in— making the sum total $20,410,164, 
paid in that fifteen years by the people 
of the city of Boston to meet the in- 
terest on the bonds maturing average $1,360,677 
for each and every one of the years, if a general 
average is made. So that if no more debt be con 
tracted by the city, and if the citizens of Boston 
pay to the Sinking Fund Commissioners (and if 
they buy no more bonds which are not matured), 
$1,360,677 each year, they vvill have sufiicient to 
pay the interest on the bonds which they hold, 
and also a sufficient amount to pay in to meet the 
indebtedness when it matures and to pay it at its 
maturitv. We paid to the Sinking Fund Com- 
missioners last year $2,900,000— $3,000,000 in round 
numbers — to meet this indebtedness which re- 
quires only $1,300,000 to meet it. This year, on the 
30th of April, we will pay $2,.500,948, if the unex- 
pended balances are given them ; and without 
them we pay $1,708,948 at the end of the year to 
the Sinking Fund Commissioners, or it is credited 
to them by the Treasurer; or, in other words, 
$500,000 more than is absolutely necessary to be 
paid by the citizens of Boston in order to 
pay the interest on the bonds held by 
the Sinking Fund Commissioners, and not 
on the debt when it matures. I think I 
have made myself plain to every member of the 
Board of Aldermen so far as this is concerned. 
Now, next year we must pay this amount. How 
are we to get it? The Sinking Fund Commission- 
ers will receive their $800,000 incerest precisely as 
any private individual receives the interest on 
bonds of the city of Boston which he holds. It 
needs but five or six hundred thousand dollars 
more to come within the amount necessary to be 
raised in order to meet this amount and to pay 
the debt at maturity; and also to pay the 
interest. How shall they receive it? This 
last year we received from betterments— 1 under- 
stand that no public lands were sold in the city of 
Boston this last year, while the city is obliged to 
take care of a great aeal of it and will be obliged 
to sell it very soon— $725,000; from Feb. 4 to Feb. 
17, $39,000. The Treasurer tells me that $70,000 
more will be forthcoming before the 30th day of 
April. There is the interest on the cash in hand 
($800,000), which will be turned into bonds of the 
city before the 30th day of April next. Now, 
sir', it is safe to say that the city of 
Boston will receive at least as much next 
year as will amount to five or six hundred 
thousand dollars, or at least within two hun- 
dred thousand dollars of that received last year — 
sufficient to meet all the wants of the Sinking Fund 
Commissioners. Ought we to do it? Throughout 



83 



BOARL> OF ALiDERME M, 



the city of Boston the cry comes up, from those 
who hold real estate, to do something to lighten 
the burden of taxation. The mortgages upon the 
real estate in the city of Boston represent the pov- 
erty of the people of the city of Boston. They rep- 
resent the amounts of their property pledged for 
the payment of so much money. That is what they 
represent; nothing more and nothing less. I saw 
the other day, in a very • respectable newspaper, 
whose editor is right in front of me, that a gentle- 
man accounted wealthy was obliged to put a third 
mortgage upon his estate for the purpose of pay- 
ing his taxes at City Hall. People hold on to 
their real estate and cling to it. And why ? Be- 
cause Ave or six years ago they gave a large 
amount of money for it, and all that they have in 
the world is sunk in real estate ; they hold on to it 
in the hope that brighter and better days will 
come round in a short time, and they keep their 
property today at a loss. Now, the question is, 
with such a state of things, whether the city 
of Boston, when it has sufficient to meet 
all the wants of the Sinking Fund Commissioners, 
should not, for a year or two, at least, do some- 
thing to lighten the burdens of taxation of those 
who pay taxes into the city treasury — for after all 
real estate mainly pays the taxes and supports the 
City Government. Two millions of dollars — more 
than twenty per cent, of all that is raised to carry 
on the City Government — are paid into the sink- 
ing funds every year. If we are to pay so much 
every year, let it appear upon the tax levy; so 
that it is seen that is to be paid to the Sinking 
Fund Commissioners. If it requires so much to 
nurse the babies that they have in charge, let us 
know it. Why have two millions of dollars been 
paid for debt that has not matured and was not 
payable for the next fifteen years? I un- 
derstand that that is one of the great faults 
found with Mr. Boutwell, late Secretary of the 
Treasury. The Sinking Fund Commissioners say 
that you have so much money in this pocket; it is 
your pocket, but we have charge of it ; we have a 
little money in that pocket, and the little you have 
we will take away from you. It is true they may 
be able to till the other pocket for us, but they say 
they will not let up upon us now. I understand 
that the Sinking Fund Commissioners say they 
will call for eight hundred thousand dollars if we 
take this away from them. Nobody will more 
readily give the amount necessary to meet the 
obligations of the city of Boston, to meet the debt 
when it matures, and to pay the interest on the 
bond when it is due, than I will; and nobody will 
more cheerfully vote for anything of that kind 
than I will; but I cannot see, and I venture to 
say that the commissioners cannot say, why we 
shall want so large an amount if we take this from 
them. Sufficient should be raised to meet all 
their obligations, but not to buy bonds at par 
which do not mature for twenty years. Tomor- 
row ,$51,000 of bonds will be bought at par which 
the city of Boston sold for ninety-six cents, if they 
are not sold, and with this same money. This 
Board is amply able to deal with this subject with- 
out its going to the Finance Committee. The 
sinking funds and the doings of the Sinking Fund 
Commissioners are matters which very few under- 
stand, and I doubt if some of the commissioners 
understand them themselves. I doubt, sir, if tliey 
do. There is one man in this City Hall who under- 
stands the subject, and he is not a member of 
the commission; and if he is brought before 
this Board I warrant that he will give 
such an explanation of this whole affair and the 
way in which the funds in the hands of the Com- 
missioners are used — I do not say dishonestly. 
But it is their desire to pay the city debt that he 
will give an explanation of, and will show this 
Board conclusively that there is no necessity for 
taxing the citizens of Boston for money unneces- 
sarily to put into the Sinking Funds. For that 
reason alone, and not because — as some papers 
have insinuated — we want to make political capi- 
tal of it, this ordinance is reported. This is 
a matter that affects the taxpayers, and they are 
Democrats and Republicans, it is to lighten the 
burdens of taxation for the next year at least that 
we have reported this ordinance. I hope it will 
not be referred to the Finance Committee, and 
that the matter will be discussed here in open 
board, that each member will make up his mind 
and hear any explanation which can be given: 
let us hear one side and the other pnd come to a 
conclusion without referring it to any committee. 
Following are the figures in detail from which 
Alderman Fitzgerald spoke : 



Whole amount of our indebtedness, 

Jan. 31, 1877 )S!44:,G37,072.20 

On the savne date, amount in Sinking 

Fund 13,370,670.00 

Cash in the Sinking Funds 2 ,364,964.49 

Total amount of cash and bonds 15,735,639.49 

Outstanding indebtedness, same date.. 1^31,286,997.30 

Amount which the Sinking Fund Com- 
missioners received from the treas- 
ury from April 30, 1876, to Feb. 4, 
1877, the sanme being revenue from 
betterments, sales of public lands, 
liquor licenses, etc §725, 141.00 

Amount which tliey have received from 
interest on bonds in Sinking Fund 
from April 31, 1876, to Jan. 31, 
1877 552,680.83 

Amount from same due April 1, 1877. . 275,000.00 

Amount received from their cash r' e- 
posits in bank from April 30, 1876, 
to Feb. 4, 1877 39,643.34 

Amount to be paid up to April 30, 1877, 

interest on same, say 15,000.00 

Additional revenue froin betterments 

ui)toFeb.l7 31,483.18 

Additional revenue to end of year, say. 70,000.00 

Total $1,708,948,35 

If you add the unexpended balances . . . 800,000.00 

Total amoimt to be paid into Sinking 

Fund g2 ,500.948.35 

From April 30, 1875, to April 30, 1876, there was 
paid into the Sinking Fuud from the same source 
$2,996,544.66. 

Last year the Sinking Fund Commissioners can- 
celled $!,539,000 of these twenty-years bonds, some 
of which were not due until 1890. 

Amount authorized by statute to be raised on 
the $31,286,997.30 outstanding would not be over 
$1,118,210.92, an assessment on an average per- 
centage of 3.55-100 per cent. 

The following table shows the decrease of the 
Sinking Fund in detail as above outlined : 

V > > 

%^ OO re '^■^5 

:l P? %^^% 

Jan. 1, 1877.. )?31,484,147 .... j?4,865.740 

Apl.30,1877.. 30,618,406 SS(865,740 3,809,850 

•■' 1878.. 29,682,406 936,000 2,918,423 

1879.. 28,419,701 1,262,705 2,331,788 

1880.. 24,737,401 3,682,300 1,219,419 

1881.. 23,962,901 774,500 1,048,278 

1882.. 23,276,401 686,500 929,953 

1883.. 22,492,401 784,000 820.178 

1884.. 21,740,401 752,000 732,217 

1885.. 21,297,401 443,000 688,037 

1886.. 20,599,401 698,000 627,751 

" 1887.. 20,262,401 337,000 602,234 

1888.. 20,108,401 154,000 591,910 

1889.. 19,982,901 125,500 584,402 

1890.. 19,727,401 255,500 570,664 

" 1891.. 19,293,401 434,000 540,571 

1892.. 18,745,401 548,000 525,388 

" 1893.. 12,693,797 6,051,603 281,751 

"■ 1894.. 11,067,797 1,626,000 221,817 

1895.. 10,099,297 968,500 189,034 

1896.. 10,099,297 

1897.. 10,099.297 

" 1898.. 10,099,297 

1899.. 10,099,297 

" 1900.. 6,582,711 3,516,586* 108,190 

" 1901.. 6,582.711 

1902.. 6,582.711 

" 1903.. 3,766,000 2,816,711 55,715 

1904.. 3,720,000 46,000 55,014 

1905.. 3,663,300 56.700 54,089 

" 1906.. 2,005,000 1,658,300 28,751 

" 1007.. .... 2,005,000 

15)20,410,164 

1,360,677 
Average amount to be raised each year and paid into 
Sinking Fund to meet debt at maturity. 

* Of this amount £8000 is required to [be paid in each 
year until 1900, the cost of which is uot'lncluded in 
the third column. 

Thirty years, payments of £8000 per annum will 
pay of principal and save In interest) £531.510 8 

Original loan, £800,000 
531,510 8 

£268,489 12 of debt not paid or sav- 
ed in interest. 



FEBKUAR-Y 19, 18 7 7 



83 



The amount of debt paid before maturity since the 
organization of the Sinking Fund, Dec. 24, 1870, was 
§2,223.072.92— averaging about j?370,512 in each year, 
most of which would have become due in the years of 
1890 to 1895. 

Alderman Clark — It is for the very purpose of 
getting intormation upon this important subject 
that I ask to have it referred to the Finance Com- 
mittee. I am willing to confess that I do not 
sufficiently understand this subject to vote or talk 
upon it intelligently, anil I doubt veiy much 
whether the Alderman who has just taken his seat 
— with all the eloquence he has displayed— under- 
stands it as well as those who have made it a 
study and have had the care of it for the last ten 
or lifteen 7 ears. It is all very well for a man to get 
up here with an array of ligures which he has been 
getting up to suit his own "side of the case. He may 
understand it very thoroughly, but I doubt very 
much if the other members of his committee under- 
stand it as he understands it. It is an unusual 
thing to act upon a question involving what this 
does— an entire change in the system of managing 
the funds which are appropriated to pay the debts 
of the city of Boston as they will become due, 
without its being referred to the committee who 
are supposed to know and to understand some- 
thing about the operations of the Sinking Funds. 
It is, furthermore, an unusual thing for a member 
of the Board of Aldermen to charge the Sinking 
Fund Commission, composed as it is of the Mayor, 
the City Auditor, and other gentlemen supposed 
to he possessed of a reasonable amount of intelli- 
gence and honesty; and I say it is an unusual 
thing for a new member of the Board of Aldermen 
to charge upon that commission what has been 
charged here this afternoon — dishonesty and 
fraud, for that is what it amounts to. Now, all I 
ask is that this subject shall be referred to the Fi- 
nance Committee, consisting of the Mayor and 
other members who ought to be possessed of a 
certain amount of honesty and intelligence. I do 
not propose, and I am not prepared, to discuss the 
merits and demerits of this change. I supposed 
that would come when the report had been made 
by the Committee on Finance; and it is the first 
time I have heard of opposition being raised 
against referring a subject of so much importance 
as this to a committee to investigate such ques- 
tions as are proposed by the Alderman himself, and 
as come from this third party who is not a member 
of the Sinking Fund Commissioners, the Commit 
tee on Finance or the Board of Aldermen ; and I 
do not know that he is an employe of the city 
of Boston. But, Mr. Mayor, 'it seems to 
me that this Sinking Fund Commission was estab- 
lished by men who understood the city finances; 
who understood the importance of providing the 
ways and means of paying the debts of the city 
of Boston ; and it seems to me, with the little 
light that I have upon it, that it has served a good 
end in the past. I do understand that there will be 
some eight hundred thousand dollars unexpended 
appropriations this year, in all human probability. 
I do understand that if these balances are carried 
forward, you have got to assess directly upon 
the citizens of Boston eight hundred and 
lifty thousand dollars to comply with the 
statutes of the State to keep up this fund 
for paying the debts of the city. I do not in- 
tend to discuss this matter at present. I ask 
this Board of Aldermen to refer this matter to the 
Finance Committee to investigate and report 
back to this Board. I hope the Board will not re- 
fuse the common courtesy of referring this mat- 
ter, as is done with subjects of not a hundredth 
part of the importance that this is. 

Alderman Fitzgerald— To be sure I am a new 
member; but it is still more terrible for a man to 
be an old member of this Board and know nothing 
about that which he ought to know something of. 
I am a new member of this Board, and the chair- 
man of this committee which reported this ordi- 
nance, and I claim to know something about it, even 
if the gentleman does not know anything about it 
after spending four years here. I did not charge 
the gentlemen who have charge of this fund 
with being dishonest or fraudulent; not a single 
sentence which I uttereil covered a charge of that 
kind. On the contrary, I said they are honest men. 
1 know them; 1 know Mr. Denny is honest; I know 
that :Mr. Turner is, and I know that Mr. Talbot is. 
But I say that in their anxiety to cut down the 
debt, in their anxiety to take charge of the funds 
they have to care for, and pay the city debts— be- 
cause the Sinking Fund is the omnium (/atheium 
of everything which does not go into the City 
Treasury— in their anxiety to do that, they have 



lost sight of the fact that real estate and the tax- 
payers can better afford to pay two millions four 
years from now than they can one quarter of it now. 
Cut it off. If they can show to me how they want 
this $800,000 in the tax levy, I shall go for it. I 
shall not allow the Alderman to speak for me for 
the Sinking Fund Commissioners. I believe them 
to be honest. If I am a new member I have some 
right to speak about things which I know as much 
about, and perhaps more than he does. 

Alderman O'Brien— I have no objection to re- 
ferring this matter to the Finance Committee, 
only from the fact that it might jjossitaly delay 
our action. We have not much time to consider 
this matter before we shall be called upon to make 
our annual appropriations, and I believe this 
Board of Aldermen can discuss this question and 
understand it as well as they can before it goes to 
any Finance Committee. It is very easy to'under- 
stand the object of our Sinking Funds — simply to 
provide ways and means for paying the debt of 
the city at maturity. "When this is done all the 
conditions of the statutes and the ordinances are 
complied with. Now, it appears to me, and I feel 
confident I speak the sentiments of all taxpayers, 
there has been a disposition to increase our Sink- 
ing Funds more rapidly than the law requires— 
that we are forcing on our taxpayers of today the 
payment of debts that belong to another genera- 
tion. For instance, ex-Mayor Cobb, in his address 
at the close of his Administration, congratulated 
our citizens that the net debt of the city had— 

Decreased in three years S580,'297.26 

The Sinking Funds had increased. .2, 587,171.89 
Or, in other words, we have paid during these 
three years all our obligations— reduced our debt 
and Increased our Sinking Funds by taxing our 
people 553,167,469 more than they ought to be 
taxed, and this is called splendid financiering, 
when every one knows that these three years 
were years of the greatest depression in ousiness 
ever experienced, or is likely to be experienced 
for the next fifty years — when almost every citi- 
zen has found it a difficult matter to jjay taxes 
and current expenses, and when thousands of 
small estates were forced off' by auction for non- 
payment of taxes. This may be good legislation 
tor the next generation, but it is hard on the tax- 
payers of the present day. Again, it has been as- 
serted by our late Mayor that the Sinking Fund 
and its accumulations will pay our debt in eight 
years. Now, I do not believe that the taxpayers 
of this city desire to pay this debt in eight years 
— a debt that will average fifteen years before it 
matures— and it appears to me that if our Sinking 
Funds are so arranged as to pay this debt in fif- 
teen years, we do all that is required of us to keep 
up the credit and standing of the city; to attempt 
to do more is only adding to burdens 
that are already considered oppressive. Our 
Sinking Fund is a mystery to almost ev- 
ery one in City Hall. We have had in 
the City Council, for some years past, gentle- 
men of considerable financial ability and reputa- 
tion as bankers, and they have found these funds 
complicated and difficult to understand. There is 
scarcely a man in City Hall that understands them 
fully, and 1 will not even except the Sinking Fund 
Commissioners. We only know that, with unex- 
pended balances, interest, betterments, etc., they 
are growing rapidly, far more than sufficient to 
take care of our debt; but, in looking at this rapid 
accumulation, we are apt to forget that it is all at 
the expense of our taxpayers. Mr. Peabody, who 
was chairman of a committee last year to simplify 
these funds, remarked "that they were exceeding- 
ly complicated, and it is very important that some 
simplification should take place. If any one 
should go down there and see the amount of book- 
keeping required to keep the accounts of eight 
sinking funds and four revenue funds, he would 
be amazed and say that a simplification was very 
desirable." This is the opinion of one of our most 
IJiominent bankers. Mr. Jaques, another member 
of the Council and largely interested in banking 
institutions, remarked "that our i)resent system 
of the Sinking Funds not only adds nothing to the 
security of the debt, but that its machinery is 
clumsy and liable to misconstruction, and that, 
in fact, it does not well answer the pur- 
pose for which it is intended." This also 
appears, to be the opinion of almost everyone of 
any financial ability who has given the matter any 
attention. Now, if we take a common-sense view 
of the matter, outside of the red tape and circum- 
locution by which these funds are surrounded, we 
know that our Sinking Funds now amount in round 
numbers to $16,000,000, to pay a debt of ,'$31,484,000, 



BOA]RD OF aj:^dji:k.m:en 



which averages due in fifteen years. Now everj' 
one knows who has given the accumulation of 
money any consideration, tliat a Sinking Fund of 
$16,000,000, with its accumulations of interest will 
pay our deht in fifteen years, to say nothing' of the 
additions from other sources. These additions are 
very considerable, and embrace all the revenue de- 
rived from liquor licenses, all betterments, the sur- 
plus earnings from the Mystic water, the sale of 
public lands and the instalments from other 
property sold by the city. With the accumula- 
tions of interest and the additions enumerated, 
our debt is alreadj' provided for. There is 
no necessity whatever of adding these unex- 
pended balances to these funds, balances that 
are taking the life blood from our taxpayers. 
There is no necessity whatever for taxing our peo- 
ple eight per cent, for loans of ten years, 314 per 
cent, for loans of twenty years, or two per cent, 
for loans of thirty years, because the ordinance 
provides that when, "in the judgment of the Sink- 
ing Fund Commissioners, any sinking fund is 
suflScient, with its prospective accumulations and 
additions, to meet the outstanding debt to which 
it is applicable, all further taxation on account of 
such debt shall cease." It appears to me that we 
have now reached that point— that our Sinking 
Funds are suflftcient to take care of our debt, and 
that no further taxation on this account is neces- 
sary. The bondholders are secured beyond all 
question; the credit of the city is fully provided 
for; our debt will be paid at maturity; and hav- 
ing accomplished so much, let us turn'and take a 
look at our taxjjayers and have some mercy for 
them. The unexpended balances this year will 
be about $800,000, and it will be a great relief to 
taxpayers if this amount is left out of the tax 
levy and carried over to next year's appropria- 
tions. If everything were prosperous it would not 
be a matter of so much importance; but now when 
taxation is so burdensome, any relief is desirable. 
Be!^ides, departments are disposed to over-esti- 
mate their wants, and it is very fre- 
quently remarked that it makes no ' differ- 
ence, because all unexpended balances go in- 
to the Sinking Fund. The Fire Depart- 
ment and fire alarms over - estimated tlieir 
appropriations the last financial year $137,- 
000, and our taxpayers were taxed for just so 
much more than was necessary because our Fire 
Commissioners blundered. This is looked upon by 
some in City Hall as good financiering, but if every 
department over-estimated in the same proportion , 
to what a condition it would reduce our taxpayers. 
They might as well surrender their property at 
once to the city. Now, I believe that instead of 
the Sinking Funds swallowing up everything, a 
direct tax of 8, 31/2 and 2 per cent., as provided for 
by law, would be far better for all new loans, be- 
cause then we would know what debts we are 
called upon to pay. The debts maturing during the 
next thirteen years, not including water loans, al- 
so show that we are in a strong position financial- 
ly to meet all- obligations. These debts (they are a 
little different from the figures given by the Alder- 
man from Ward 21, but they will perhaps do to in- 
clude in the statement), as taken from the Audit- 
or's report, are as follows : 

Year ending April 30, 1878 Sl,222,5«0 

1879 1,242,705 

" " 1880 3,018,300 

" " 1881 724,500 

1882 660,500 

•' " 1883 1,442,000 

, " 1884 1,118,000 

1885 442,000 

1886 1,306,000 

" 1887 363,000 

" 1888 265,000 

1889 1,828,500 

1890 309,500 

Total for thirteen years •..gl3,942,505 

Or a little more than an average of $1,000,000 per 
year. A debt of about $14,000,000 due in thirteen 
years, with a sinking fund of $16,000,000 and its ac- 
cumulations of interest and additions to meet it! 
I do not think that any mercantile house in Bos- 
ton, or any banking house, would think of resort- 
ing to balances or taxation with such material in 
their hands. Allowing a reasonable increase in 
valuations, a tax of about one dollar in a thousand 
would pay the entire debt maturing during the 
next thirteen years, to say nothing of the accumu- 
lations of our Sinking Fund during that time, 
which should not be allowed to increase and mul- 
tiply beyond actual requirements. It appears to 
me "clear that there is no necessity for these bal- 
ances going into our Sinking Funds, now or here- 



after; that our debt is already provided for, and 
that the taxpayers should have a rest. I hope 
that this order will pass, because it will reduce 
taxation the coming year at least $800,000, and be- 
cause it can be done without impairing in the 
least the standing of our securities or the credit of 
the city. 

Alderman Clark— I can see in the argument 
which the Alderman has just made a greater 
reason than I supposed to exist for asking to have 
this referred to the Finance Committee. Mem- 
bers of the same committee do not agree in their 
figures. One represents the debt at $33,000,000 
and the other at 3644,000,000— a slight difference of 
only ten or twelve millions. 

Alderman Fitzgerald— We agree substamtially. 

Alderman Clark— They should not agree sub- 
stantially, but entirely. 

Alderman Fitzgerald— We do. 

Alderman Clark — Now the water works have got 
to be provided for ; they do not take care of thein- 
selves. The Cocnituate water works have not 
paid the interest on the water debt and the cost of 
carrying them on by over a million of dollars ; so 
that' the water works will not take care of the 
bonds when they become due. The fact is that 
we have had this Sinking Fund accumulat- 
ing on our hands, that we have been en- 
abled to obtain money when we want it 
and at a very low rate, and it is from that fact 
that our bonds were taken during the past year at 
such favorable rates, five percent, bonds bringing 
twelve and fifteen per cent, premium in the mar- 
ket. We are paying our debts, and it is the first 
time that I have heard that it was discreditable to 
a city or an individual to pay his debts, or to an- 
ticipate them if he chooses to do so. All I ask is 
that this matter shall be referred to the Finance 
Committee, so that it can be investigated, so that 
the figures of the committee can be made to agree, 
if necessary, and so that their views can be made 
harmonious, if possible. It is a very fortunate 
thing that there are such large balances of appi-o- 
priations to go into the Sinking Funds, as is shown 
this year; and if the Fire Commlssioners,in running 
their department in such an economical manner, 
have been able to turn a hundred and thirty or 
fifty thousand dollars into the Sinking Funds, it 
shows the wisdom of the commissioners who have 
charge of that department. It has been an unu- 
sual year in the Fire Department, and their ex- 
penditures have been unusually small; hence their 
ability to turn a very much larger amount into 
the Sinking Fund than perhaps they will be able 
to do for some years to come. I believe that, if 
these appropriations are carried forward, it will 
be necessary to tax the people by a direct tax for 
the amount required by law to be turned into 
the Sinking Funds. I hope that the Board will 
not vote upon this question unadvisedly, without 
knowing fully whether such is not the fact, and 
whether we are not required to do so by stat- 
ute; whether, if these appropriations are carried 
forward, we shall not be required to lay a direct 
tax upon individuls to create this amount. The 
reference will make only a short delay of a few 
days; and it certainly can be acted upon much 
more intelligently than it can if we pass upon it 
this afternoon, when only three members of the 
Board have had an opportunity to investigate it. 

Alderman Fitzgerald — The gentleman opposite 
labors under a misapprehension if he thinks there 
is any difference between myself and the other 
gentleman who is a member of the committee. 
We thoroughlv agree that the gross debt of the 
city on the 31st day of January was $44,000,000. 
He and I agree upon that. On the 31st day of 
January the outstanding debt of the citv, minus 
the cash, and bonds they hold, was $31,2*89,937.30. 
He and t agree upon it; only he may perhaps have 
got his figures on the 1st of January and I had 
them on the 31st of January. If that be the only 
additional reason which the gentleman sees for 
referring the report to the Committee on Finance, 
it is a very poor and flimsy one. I agree with the 
Alderman upon the committee that if this matter 
is to be discussed, here is the place to discuss it, 
and here is the place to get information. You 
may have it locked up till doomsday in a commit- 
tee room, and when it is reported on, the members 
of this Board will be just the same as regards in- 
formation on the subject. I question whether 
they will get as much information as the Commit- 
tee on Retrenchment did. 

Alderman O'Brien— The fact is settled that we 
have a Sinking Fund of sixteen million dollars. 
The debt of the city outside of the water debt is 
about thirtv-one millions. The water debt would 



FEBRUARY 19, 1877 



85 



increase our gross indebtedness to about I'orty-tive 
millions. Now, with a Sinking Fund of sixteen 
millions, any gentleman here,, any member ot this 
Board, can count up the amount, how much it will 
increase and multiply in the course of thirty years. 
A large portion of this water debt does not come 
due for thirty years, an d I believe that with our pres- 
ent Sinking Fund, with its accumulations and in- 
terest, in the coxirse of thirty years we can pay 
not onlv our debt for general purposes, but also 
our water debt. With this Sinking Fund I cannot 
see the necessity for a dollar of taxation. The in- 
terest on the gix)s.s debt has to be raised every 
year— that is, we have to raise by taxation every 
year the interest on forty-liv e millions of dollars. 
Our general Sinking Fund of sixteen millions of 
dollars is drawing Interest at six per cent. Then 
again, all the accumulations from licenses, sales 
oif public lands and from the sales of other prop- 
erty, etc., are swallowed up in these funds and go 
into them. In fact, I do not see any necessity for 
taxing our citizens one dollar, if there are no ex- 
traordinary expenses, to meet our debt for the 
next thirty years. 

Alderman Clark— I fully agree with the Alder- 
man that this is the proper place to discuss this 
question, but this is not the proper time. Itis not 
sufficiently understood. It is only this afternoon 
that the programme and the reasons are given 
why there should be a change made in the mode 
of conducting the Sinking Funds of the city. It 
is a fortunate thing, Mr. Mayor, that these bal- 
ances of appropriations have been turned in to 
make up the Sinking Fund ; for, if they had not 
we should have had only a Sinking Fund of five 
or six millions instead of sixteen. That system 
has proved detrimental to the cities of New York 
and Philadelphia^this carrying forward the 
unexpended balances. l"^ do not propose 
to discuss the merits and demerits of 
this question now; but I simply ask the 
Board to give me an opportunity to look over this 
subject, and perhaps by the next meeting we 
shall have agreed that tliis is the best thing to do. 
I do not understand that the views of the mem- 
bers of the Council differed as to the importance 
of a Sinking Fund; it was simply in regard to the 
method of keeping the accounts of the Sinking 
Fund. That I understand to have been the views 
of Mr. Jacques and Mr. Peabody. It was simply 
as to the keeping of the accounts of the Sinking 
Fund, and not to the fund itself. 

Alderman Fitzgerald— I want the members of 
this Board to understand this matter thoroughly. 
I agree with the Alderman opposite that it is an 
important matter ; it is a matter of saving one 
million dollars this year or not, and I have no 
desire, as chairman of the committee, and 
certainly none of the other members of 
the committee have any desire, to press 
this to a vote unless the members of the 
Board can vote upon it intelligently. But I am 
decidedly opposed to referring this matter to any 
other committee. They have received all the in- 
formation from this committee that they will ob- 
tain themselves. I have no objection to postpon- 
ing it for one week more, so that members can 
vote intelligently upon it. So far as the Alder- 
man referred to some other gentleman connected 
with the Sinking Fund Commission and the Fi- 
nance Committee last year, I would state that one 
of the gentlemen, who is a prominent financier in 
this city, has stated— and his statement is in 
writing before the proper persons now— that 
certain sections in the present ordinance 
in relation to Sinking Funds were put into it with- 
out his knowledge, and that he thought there 
were certain sections put in there which would 
Ijrevent the Sinking Fund Commissioners from 
buying up bonds before they matured. The Al- 
derman opposite says that is a good plan. It may 
be, sir, that is, if a man a million dollars to spare ; 
but if I have my carpet mortgaged it is n't a good 
plan for me to buy a piano. If I am short of 
money today, it is not a good plan to buy up my 
note at par that does not become payable six 
years from now, when I feel that I can meet that 
note without disturbing myself. You would not 
say that a man was a wise man to buy up his note 
today, and give for it all he had. It is a mere 
question as to the policy, and not of the necessity, 
of the Sinking Funds. 

Alderman Clark— I think the Alderman is mis- 
taken in regard to the views of the eminent 
banker. I was present at the last meeting of the 
Finance Committee when this matter was brought 
up, and his desire was to simplify the method of 
keeping the accounts of the Sinking Funds, red\ic- 



ing them from twelve to six, but not with any in- 
tention of curtailing the funds or changing any- 
thing to prevent their accumulation. As I under- 
stood it then, and understand it now, it was his 
desire that the accounts should be consolidated 
and reduced in number from twelve to six; but at 
no time did be ever express any desire that any 
measure should be taken looking to the abandon- 
ment of this system of sustaining and creating 
the Sinking Funds for the redemption of the city 
debt. I think I am right about that, and I think 
that if he were questioned upon that point he 
would state that to be a fact. 

Alderman Fitzgerald— My point was that he ob- 
jected to that section of the ordinance, because 
under it the Sinking Fund Commissioners could 
buy bonds before they had matured. 

Alderman Clark — [ take issue with the gentle- 
man that that is not the point which Mr. Peabody 
makes in regard to the Sinking Funds of the city 
of Boston. Now, if we take issue on such impor- 
tant questions, let it be referred to the Finance 
Committee, to learn whether we are right or not. 

Alderman Allies— This is a question of vital im- 
portance, and in order to allow time for further 
consideration, I hope it will not be acted upon be- 
forelnext Monday. I believe in a Sinking Fund, 
and 1 have been trying to organize one for the last 
thirty years. Every thousand dollars I lay away, 
I think my note is worth just so much more. I 
hope it will go to the Committee on Finance. 

Alderman Fitzgerald — I move that the report be 
laid upon the table. 

Alderman Clark— I hope that motion will not 
be carried. I think the best thing to be done is to 
refer it to the Finance Committee, and they can 
make their report, and then will be the time to go 
into the argument of the merits of the measure. 

Alderman O'Brien— In the remarks I made I said 
not a word against maintaining the Sinking Fund. 
I believe it ought to be maintained. But my point 
is this: That our Sinking Fund has already 
reached the point when taxation must cease, and 
I believe that every sensible financier will say the 
same thing. With our present Sinking Fund of 
sixteen millions, we ought to put our feet down 
and say that taxation should cease. 

Alderman Clark — I agree with the Alderman 
fully, if we have arrived at that time. Let it go 
to the Finance Committee to find out if we have 
reached that time. It is no way to find out those 
things by going to an assistant bookkeeper. There 
has been such a thing as an assistant bookkeeper 
making mistakes. Let it go to the proper com- 
mittee to be investigated ; let them make inquiries 
of the bookkeeper. That is the proper course for 
it to pursue. 

Alderman Thompson — If I understand this ques- 
tion I do not see why we cannot settle it this 
afternoon as well as to have it referred to the Fi- 
nance Committee and have it brought back and 
then discussed. It is simply that what we have 
left unexpended at the end of the financial year 
shall go towards the appropriation for the next 
year. A great deal has been said about the funds. 
Now, I don't see that we propose to touch the 
funds at all. That Redemption Fund will continue 
just as it is now without any reference to 
particular appropriations. There is a disad- 
vantage in having so large an amount to be placed 
into the hands of the Trustees of the Sinking 
Funds for the reason that they are known to be 
desirous of investing the funds, and when they 
go into the market they are obliged to pay a large 
premium to get satisfactory security. Now, as a 
taxpayer of the city — and I might say 
the same of other taxpayers, for they do 
do not care to go into the market and pay this six, 
eight or ten per cent, premium when taxes are so 
oppressive; and that is the result of doing this 
thing every year — I don't profess to know much 
about this question, but so far as I understand it, 
it is simply a problem whether we have paid our 
debts this year, and have got so much to pay next 
year, and we shall leave the Sinking Fund to take 
care of itself. The present amount of the Sinking 
Fund will take care of what we have already out. 

Alderman Clark called for the yeas and nays. 

The motion to lay on the table was carried. 

Yeas— Aldermen Breck, Fitzgerald, Oibson, 
O'Brien, Robinson, .Slade, Wilder — 7. 

Nays — Aldermen Burnham, Clark, Dunbar, 
Thomp.son, Viles— 5. 

Later in the session Alderman Thompson moved 
to take the ordinance from the table. 

Alderman Clark— I hope that motion will not be 
oarrried. It seems to me it was laid on the table 



86 



BOAIil> OF ALDERMEN, 



in order to give tlie Board of A.ldermen an oppor- 
tunity to into the merits of the question. 

Alderman Thompson — I rise to a point of order. 
The question is not debatable. 

The Mayor— The question is not debatable. 

Alderman Clark— It has been customary to give 
members of the Board an opportunity to give rea^ 
sons for not taking a subject from the table. I 
shall rely upon the honor of the Board of Alder- 
men to let this matter remain upon the table in 
order to give me, as a member of this Board, an 
opportunity to investigate this matter. 

Alderman Thompson — When this matter is taken 
from the table I will give the reasons. 

The Mayor— The question is not debatable. 

Alderman Clark called for the yeas and nays. 
The motion to take from the table was lost— yeas 
4, nays 8: 

"Seas- Aldermen Breck, Fitzgerald, Slade, 
Thompson— i. 

Nays — Aldermen Burnham, Clark, Dunbar, Oib- 
son, O'Br'en, Robinson, Viles, Wilder— 8. 

CITV KEGISTKAB AND BOARD OF HEALTH. 

The order for a petition to the Legislature for 
an act to place the City Registrar under the Board 
of Health was considered under unfinished busi- 
ness. 

Alderman Burnham — Mr. Chairman, it seems to 
me we should be somewhat cautious in taking 
any steps to Inaugui-ate the change contemplated 
in this order. Boston has a system of registration 
of vital statistics taken as a whole of great excel- 
lence. It is the best known in any city. It is so 
acknowledged. It has grown up along with the 
existence of our city, for nearly two centuries. 
This order, if I understand it, is the germ from 
which radical changes are to come. I suppose the 
order to be put forth in the interest of economy — 
and I have no question of the sincerity of those 
who think it may wisely be aone— but from what 
attention I have been able to give to the matter it 
seems to me to be an unwise and a false econ- 
omy to carry the Registry Department to the 
Health Department. Now, Mr. Chairman, why 
should it go to that department? The work o'f 
registration is not a sanitary one. It does not 
come within the domain of medicine or surgery, 
and physicians, as such, have no more knowledge 
of the subject than any well-informed person who 
has given thought to the matter. In this matter 
of registration I can see no more connection with 
the health of the city than the thermometei' nas 
with the weather. The thermometer indicates the 
temperature of the weather, that is all. This reg- 
istration exhibits the number of deaths and their 
character, but in no way suggests any measures 
whatever for the removal of disease. Now, to 
claim that the Board of Health, in order to dis- 
charge their duties, or to gain facilities 
to enable them the more easily to per- 
form their duties, need the merging of 
the Registration Department into that of the 
Board of Health, is pure assumption — and I can- 
not concede that such a claim can be made where 
one has sought to properly inform himself — for 
even if it be necessary to ascertain where death 
occurs, when the fact is learned the health au- 
thorities can have no further need from this 
source of information. If it be advisable that the 
Board of Health should be put in possession of 
the names and character of the diseases, and 
where death occurred, a copy of the returns made 
to the City Registrar's office covild be furnished 
the Board of Health daily. It could be 
made the Registrar's duty, and would create 
no additional expense. Boston has had a 
system of registration for 240 years; out- 
side of New England there is no complete 
registration of vital statistics — the registration of 
deaths only being complete. Boston and Provi- 
dence are the only two cities in the United States 
that are conceded to have full and accurate rec- 
ords of births, marriages and deaths — and in 
neither of these places does a board of health 
have charge of the registration ; — and if boards of 
health have the matter in their hands in other 
places, it is simply the result of accident, and not 
because there is any necessity for it. The Board 
of Health of New York city is acknowledged to 
be the most thorough in its workings of any out- 
side of New England. It is a department like ours. 
It was created in 1866. And allow me a few com- 
parisons: Prom its first annual report we learn 
that, although the city's registrSition of deaths 
reaches back to 1798, not a birth or marriage was 
registered until 1847. That report spoke of the 
registry of New York city from 1847 to 18C6, as 



almost valueless, because of its manifest incom- 
pleteness. Since then we have its annual reports, 
and quoting from these reports we find it proves 
its incompleteness by a comparison with the regis- 
tration of Boston. For instance, the birth rate 
of Boston for a given period was one in 32 69-100 
of the population, while in New York in the same 
period, it was one in 69 6-10 of the population. 
Again, the report quotes the marriage rate of 
Boston, in 1864, at 15 31-100 marriages for 1000 
population, or 3062 in 100,000 population, while in 
New York the reported marriage rate for the same 
period was 11291/2 in 100,000 population, and in such 
a Contrast the report says, and well it may, "the 
incompleteness of our registration of births and 
marriages requires no comment." In the report 
of the Board of Health of New York for 1867, we 
read, "The number of births registered in 
the city of New York in the year ending- 
September, 1866, was 12,569, not quite half 
the number of births that must have occurred 
in that period," i. e., by comparison with the care- 
fully maintained birth records in Boston. There 
is also another comparison of the marriage rate 
of the two cities, admitting a corresponding dis- 
crepancy in the records of that city as compared 
with Boston. 

Again, in the New York Board of Health records 
of 1870 it is said, "The records of marriages are 
extremely imperfect, and tor all practical pur- 
poses wellnigh useless." The New York report 
of 1872 says, "The number of births recorded does 
not by any means represent the actual number of 
births which occurred in this city [New York]. 
The birth rate was but 23 42-100 in a 1000, 
while the bli-th rate of Boston, which is 
probably as accurate as any other American city, 
was 34 98-100 per 1000." The report further says, 
"This comparative discrepancy in the returns 
between Boston and our city is very marked, and 
is mainly due to the laxity of enforcement of law, 
and the want of proper facilities for the collection 
of the returns." 

Now, Mr. Chairman, with our Registry Depart- 
ment no such laxity has ever been; and here 
we find a strong argument for a continuation of 
our present admirable system, so much better 
than others, that I feel we should be slow to make 
a change. And, Mr. Chairman, the Board of 
Health for New York city do not improve upon 
the record I have given in this comparison ; for in 
reports since I read — "The actual birth rate 
and ratio of marriages yearly to the population 
in this city [New York] cannot be stated with en- 
tire accuracy because of incompleteness in the 
returns of these two branches of record." Again, 
"The registration of births in this city still con- 
tinues to be unsatisfactory, not more than sixty- 
five per cent, of the total that actually occur an- 
nually are reported to the bureau." Now, Mr. 
Chairman, I have given you in these quotations 
you have allowed me to make the record of the 
Board of Health work in the matter of registra- 
tion of vital statistics for New York city. This is 
the best Board of Health record we know of out- 
side of New England. Ought we to inaugurate a 
change that might result in such a style of regis- 
tration for Boston ? What proof that more effi- 
ciency can be expected of a Board of Health in 
Boston than from that of New York city — the 
latter has had eleven years' experience — 
and our Health Department but three years, and 
that with deaths only. Our Board of Health sat- 
isfactorily performs its duties. Why add to it 
what in so large a measure is foreign to its work? 
There can be no saving to the city treasury by the 
change, for to maintain our system there will be 
no less clerical force required to do the work after 
being merged into the Health Department. If we 
have too many clerks in either department let 
them be discharged. In conclusion I would say it 
is an undeniable fact that Boston's registration of 
vital statistics, taken as a whole, is superior to 
that of every other city in the United States, ex- 
cept it may be the smaller city of Providence. 
Now, is it not unwise — is it not a false economy, to 
run the risk of a change from our tried and 
proved system, which has grown up, as I have 
said, along with our city for more than two cen- 
turies. Whatever may !^e said in favor of changes 
in other directions, I believe, Mr. Chairman, we 
should refuse to make a change in this direction, 
for we certainly can do better than to uproot this 
old Boston tree. 

Alderman Wilder — I ofiEered the order which has 
just been read, and in doing so I had no purpose 
to express my opinion upon the propriety or feasi- 
bility of merging the City Registrar in the Board 



FEBRQABY 19, 1877 



■^7 



of Health. I offered the order for the purpose of 
having legislation to enable us to do so if we saw 
lit. I do not presume that I shall he ready to vote 
for such a measure, but I believe that it is well 
for the uity of Boston to have authority to do so if 
they find it expedient, and the time in which to 
obtain such legislation is very limited. When I 
offered the order I took occasion to express no 
opinion upon the subject. I presume I should 
agree with Alderman Burnhani ; and yet I believe 
that legislation on the subject is desirable. 

Alderman O'Brien — It would be surprising 
if the City Registrar's Department did not come 
up for consideration. It has been a scape- 
goat for every City Council for some years, 
and it is believed by some that the City 
Government will never advance one step to- 
wards economy and retrenchment until this de- 
partment that has quietly registered our births, 
marriages and deaths for seventy-five years is 
blotted out or absorbed by the Board of Health. 
Everybody knows, who has given the matter the 
least attention, that not one dollar could be 
saved by this change. On the contrary, every- 
thing that the Board of Health touches is largely 
increased in cost by the red tape by which it is 
surrounded in that department. In the hands of 
the Board of Health I guarantee to say that it vrould 
cost three times as much to run the Registrar's 
Department as it now costs. Nearly the whole ex- 
pense is for clerical work, and the work is done 
for comparatively small pay, mostly by ladies. 
ISTow, I would ask the Board not to be deceived by 
this movement. There are wise heads in City 
Hall, where their own interests are concerned, 
and this matter of the City Registrar's Depart- 
ment is thrown in here to distract your councils. 
I do not mean to say that the Alderman who intro- 
duced the order had any hand in Jt, but I do say 
that it has been used for that purpose fo7- some 
years past. Important changes are about to be 
introduced. A large reduction in expenditures is 
proposed, but if the wise heads of City Hall can 
induce the Aldermen to waste their time on the 
Registrar's Department, it may divide our coun- 
cils, and induce us to overlook other more impor- 
tant matters. 

If you want to economize, why not strike at the 
Board of Health, instead of the Registrar's De- 
partment ? I guarantee to say that if this depart- 
ment was placed in the hands of the Superintend- 
ent of Health $50,000 per year could be saved our 
taxpayers, and the work more efficiently per- 
formed. If the name of Superintendent is not 
high-toned enough, call him Commissioner of 
Health ; or if Commissioner of Health is not high- 
toned enough, call him the Honorable Commission- 
er of Health. We could afford to give him a title 
if we saved our taxpayers ,¥.50,000 per year. 
If you must have a three-headed commission 
make your Superintendent of Health, the City 
Physician and the Registrar your commissioners, 
and you save at once |12,000 per year and other 
expenses, or more than twice as much as the cost 
of the Registrar's Department. If you want to 
economize why not strike at the steamer Samuel 
Little, known in the harbor as the pleasure boat 
of the Board, which has cost the city .$55,279 the 
past few years, almost as much as it has cost the 
Registrar's Department during the twenty-five 
years of its existence, with no corresponding ben- 
efit — with scarcely one vessel arriving now where 
ten vessels arrived a few years ago. 

Last year this question, I su.pposed, was 
finally settled. After two years' discussion, 
a committee of which Alderman Burrage was 
chairman, who, when they first commenced their 
inquiries, believed that the change was a desira- 
ble one, reported unanimously against it. and this 
report was unanimously adopted by the board. 
This committee says — 

"The duties of the Board of Health relate only 
to the sanitary conditions of the city, and it is in- 
vested with all the authority necessary to enable 
it to perform those duties effectually. It is of 
course necessary that it should be enabled to ob- 
tain the most reliable statistics relative to death 
and disease, but its power to obtain the desired 
information already exceeds that of the City Reg- 
istrar, and it is not at all dependent upon him for 
it. With the facts relative to births and mar- 
riages it does not appear that the Board of Health 
has any concern, nor is it apparent that its effi- 
ciency would be increased were the duty of regis- 
tering those facts placed under its control. It 
would seem, therefore, that the effect of placing 
the City Registrar under the control of the 
Board of Health wonld defeat the purpose of 



the statute relative to the registration of births, 
marriages and deaths, by divesting him of the per- 
.sonal responsibility which is contemplated by law, 
while at the same time it would burden the board 
with duties which do not legitimately belong to it. 
Believing, therefore, that the registration re- 
quired by law is better provided for under the 
present system than it would be if placed under 
the control of the Board of Health, your commit- 
tee would respectfully report that' no action is 
necessary on the part of the City Council." 

Alderman Burrage also remarked, in presenting 
this report — 

The records of the Registrar furnish a brief but 
authentic history, as far as it goes, of every person 
born within the State. In many cases it is the only 
history available. Hence their preservation and 
correctness may involve the only proofs obtainable 
of the legality of marriages, the legitimacy of chil- 
dren, and consequently the descent of property and 
the distribution of estates. In my opinion it 
would be highly injudicious, if it were practica- 
ble, to make an office of such great importance an 
adjunct to an office whose functions are of an 
entirely different character. But I doubt the 
practicability of putting an officer who, from the 
nature of the case, is an agent of the Commoa- 
wealth, and responsible thereto, under the direc- 
tion and control of a board which, under the 
statutes, is only accountable to the municipal cor- 
poration by which it was established. There is 
high authority for the opinion that "no man can 
serve two masters." * * * it seems to me essen- 
tial that the registrar's office should be a distinct 
department,with no other function besides that of 
registej'ing births, intentions of marriage, mar- 
riages and deaths, and making the returns required 
by statute; and that the department should occu- 
py premises separate from those of any other de- 
partment, easy of access, with the records so ar- 
ranged that any one can at any time con- 
sult them in regard to the birth, marriage, chil- 
dren or death of any person whose name ap- 
pears therein. In the matter of economy, there 
would be little if any saving by transferring the 
work of recording to the health office. The amount 
of woik would be the same and the same number 
of clerks would be required to do it. The only 
chance to save would be in the possibility of dis- 
pensing with one of the two clerks now employed 
by the 'board to issue permits for burials, give du- 
plicate certificates, register them, and inquire into 
correctness of returns of physicians and under- 
takers. I understand the board is satisfied with 
the manner in which the matter is now arranged, 
and do not desire to take charge of a work which 
is not in their province. 

This settled the matter last year so far as our 
City Council was concerned, but outside parties, 
not satisfied with the decision, brought it before 
the Legislatuie, and the Legislature wisely re- 
fused to make the change. Is it necessary for us 
to go over the same ground again ? I repeat, the 
City Registrar's Department has been used as a 
sort of scapegoat, and is now thrown in to in- 
terfere with your schemes of retrenchment and 
economy — to direct attention from other and 
far more imj^ortant matters. In this depart- 
ment not a dollar can be saved, and If the 
men who control large expenditures of money 
can induce the Aldermen and Councilmen who 
are here only for one or two years to discuss and 
fight over it, and thus divide their councils, it is 
one point gained. This department has quietly 
pursued its work since the duties were transferred 
from the City Clerk, some twenty-five years ago, 
and would still be performing its work faithfully 
and quietly were it not for the meddlesome Boarcl 
of Health, who believe they have a right to super- 
vise every department of the city. This dig- 
nified body could not go to the Registrar's 
Department to obtain a report of deaths, 
this was altogether too much to ask of this high- 
toned commission, notwitnstanding its records 
bave been sought after and used by every distin- 
guished physician and medical journal in the 
country. It is in fact the most perfect depart- 
ment of the kind in the country. In births, mar- 
riages and deaths the correctness of names is of 
full as much importance as the correctness of the 
date of death, the date of marriage, or the disease 
of %ihich we die, and the following list will give 
some idea of the corrections made Dy the Regis- 
trar and not made by the Board of Health, so far 
as deaths are concerned ; 

Rebecca Caldwell died March 2, 1876— Reported 
Ellen Cowell. 



88 



BOABD OP ALDKRMEN, 



Antonio Chiesa died March 7, 1870. Reported 
Tonv Cliurch. 

>'ellie Cross died May 18, 1876. Reported as Del- 
ma Cross. 

Giovanni Battista Cunio died June 19, 187C. Re- 
ported Gianbatista Qunio. 

Angelina M. Biggio died May 25, ]8T<i. Reported 
as Jane Mannine. Father reported as Joseph, 
should be John B. or Giovanni B. 

Peter J. Steft'en died July 4, 1876. Reported as 
Peter J. /Stepher. 

Herbert McEnally died July 12, 1876. Repoi-ted 
as Hugh McAnally. Birthplace Dorchester. Re- 
ported as Boston. 

Agnes Gumpricht died July 28, 1876. Reported 
as Gumbericht. 

Bridget VenuUom died July 30, 1876. Reported 
as Harnngton. 

Pietro Sartarlasci died Aug. 7. Reported as 
Santalasi. 

Lydia Ann Smith died Aug. 7. Reported as 
Johnson. 

Jennie Estelle Clark died Nov. 27. Reported as 
Ehtelle GoodricUje. 

Thomas McCuen died Nov. 8. Reported as 
McKoiven. 

Peter De Bouna died Nov. 12. Reported as De 
Bonn. 

Edbert M. Pehrsohn died Dec. 17. Reported as 
Pearson. 

Annie Burkhardt died Aug. 22. , Reported as 
Maria A. Bui'kard. 

Elizabeth Zimmer died Aug. 26. Reported Cetn- 

er. 

In relation to this department it would be well 
to observe that there is no law or ordinance that 
enjoins the Board of Health to keep a correct 
record of deaths. Such a record does not assist in 
the remotest degree that body, in caring for the 
public health, as such records are for statistical 
purposes alone, and are not and never have been 
regarded as matters belonging to hygiene. Mor- 
tuary records have a relation to the public health 
analogous to that which exists between the ther- 
mometer and the temperature of the weather; 
they indicate the existence of disease, but in 
no way suggest the mode or means of 
cure. Epidemics like smallpox, are provided 
for by special laws, and are met by means wholly 
independent of mortuary registration. If it were 
desirable for the Board of Health to have a rec- 
ord of deaths, a faithful transcript could be made 
daily, in the Registrar's Department, without any 
extra cost to the city. Now, I want to say that af- 
ter the City Council so decidedly refused to make 
the change last year — after the Legislature re- 
fused to make the change last year — when not a 
dollar can be saved by it, with every probability 
that it will cost three times as much if the change 
is made, I hope this Board will give the City Reg- 
istrar's Department a rest by refusing to pass that 
order. 

The order was rejected. 

BETTERMENTS ASS U MED. 

The order for the city to assume a betterment of 
$900 laid on the Roxbury Grammar School estate 
for laying out of Swett street was considered un- 
der unfinished business. Passed. 

PAPERS FROM THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Petitions were referred in concurrence. 

Order for the Mayor to petition the Legislature 
for an act to authorize the City Council to create 
boards of commissioners for the transaction of 
any municipal business, or by vote of tlie City 
Council to take from any board already created 
any of its present powers, or to abolish svich 
board entirely; and that the salaries of such com- 
missioners, once fixed, shall be imchanged. 
Passed in concurrence. 

INVITATION ACCEPTED. 

An invitation was received from the Faneuil- 
Hali Temperance Reform, for the Mayor and Al- 
dermen to attend the first anniversary meeting of 
said club at Tremont Temple, Feb. 19, at 7V2 
P. M. Accepted, on motion of Alderman Clark. 

HORSE RAILROAD HEARINGS. 

Metropolitan. The Board took up the petition of 
the Metropolitan Railroad Company for permis- 
sion to lay down tracks on portions of Lexington, 
Prescott and Liverpool streets, on which a hear- 
ing had been ordered. 

C. A. Richards, president of the. Metropolitan 
Railroad, explained the location asked for. It 
has been put in at the express wish of citizens of 
East Boston who think they are not sufficiently 
accommodated now. 



No one appeared to object. 

The matter was recommitted to the Committee 
on Paving, on motion of Alderman Fitzgerald. 

South Boston. The Board took up the petition 
of the South Boston Railroad Company for leave 
to run cars from the southern to the northern 
depots over certain tracks of the Metropolitan, 
Middlesex and Cambridge railroads, on which a 
hearing had been ordered. 

Benjamin Dean appeared for the petitioner, ex- 
plaining the location asked for. The object is to 
enable the South Boston people to reach the 
northern depots without change of cars and for 
only one fare. 

Mr. Richards asked how many cars they pro- 
posed to run and what was tlie route. 

Mr. Crosby, the president of the road, said they 
desired to pass from Cornhill through New AVash- 
ington, Haverhill, Causeway, Portland, Merrimac 
streets back to Washington street, and thence to 
South Boston by the usual route. The people of 
.South Boston had long desired this accommoda- 
tion. Heretofore the policy of the City Govern- 
ment has been to stop the cars at Scollay square: 
but the Middlesex cars are allowed to run beyona 
that, and the people of South Boston de^^ire the 
same accommodations that the people of Charles- 
town have. [To Mr. Richards]— Should think 
they ought to be allowed to run sixteen cars per 
hour, as the Middlesex run twelve per hour to 
accommodate 40,000 people. 

Mr. Richards called attention to this as one 
more encroachment upon the rights of the Metro- 
politan road, to offset the encroachment action of 
last year in granting the Middlesex the right to go 
to the Old Colony depot. The Metropolitan is 
crushed between the upper and nether mill- 
stones. This road bought the Suffolk road to 
get to the northern depots, and did not get 
the tracks as is now proposed. He did not 
remonstrate against the petition as a whole; 
but asked that the cars allowed to go to the 
depots be drawn from those now ' running 
(m the overcrowded circuit. This whole system is 
an encroachment upon the commutation system 
adopted by the wisdom of a former Board. Citi- 
zens of Boston ride to the depots by paying only 
two cents extra. The Board should either repeal 
the commutation system or enforce it. Although 
he considered this an encroachment, he would not 
remonstrate against granting the petition ; but 
the Board should put in the resolution. [To Mr. 
Dean]— We run probably twenty cars an hour to 
the depots over our ovni tracks. 

Mr. Dean read communications from the officers 
of the Fitchburg, Old Colony. Lowell and Albany 
roads, representing that there is an increasing de- 
sire for additional horse-railroad facilities, and 
expressing a desire to have the petition granted. 
He also presented petitions of 1278 citizens, 1508 
ladies, 227 people doing business in the vicinity of 
Summer and Beach streets, 1527 patrons of the 
Old Colouy, 809 patrons of the Albany road, and 
939 patrons of the Fitchburg Railroad, in aid of 
this petition. The South Boston road, he said, 
had been more zealous than any other in giv- 
ing effect to the transfer system, and had 
never thrown any obstacles in the way, 
and had not favored the increased cost. 
He called attention to the law of 1862, allowing 
the South Boston company to enter upon and use 
the tracks of the Suffolk road (now owned by the 
Metropolitan) on condition that the Suffolk could 
run cars to the Old Colony depot. A year ago, not 
only had the cost of transfer been increased, but 
the Middlesex road was allowed to go to the Old 
Colony depot, which the Metropolitan road did 
not object to, for their own convenience, and by 
which they get substantially the same thing as 
was provided for in the legislation of 1862. He 
supposed the Board would from time to time regu- 
late the passage of the cars in the streets. To 
show the extent of the calls for this accommoda- 
tion he would call a few witnesses. 

Policeman McDonald, stationed at the Albany 
depot, said he had applications every day from 
people for information how to get to the northern 
depots, and in the summer time a great deal more. 
Some take the South Boston cars and get a trans- 
fer check ; others walk to Washington street. 

Policeman Foster, stationed at the Old Colony 
depot, gave the same testimony in regard to pas- 
sengers at that depot. 

Policeman Foster had applications in the same 
way near the Old Colony depot; he corroborated 
the statements of the other witnesses. 

Mr. Prescott, an employe of the South Boston 
road, stationed near the Old Colony and Albany 



FEriRUARY 19, 1877 



89 



depots, corroborated the previous statements. 
The applications are more numerous in summer 
than in winter. 

Mr. Dean said the road was really compelled to 
ask for this accommodation to its patrons. 

The subject was recommitted to the Committee 
on Paving, on motion of Aklermaj Clark. 

MIDDLESEX RAILROAD LOCATION IN HAYMAKKET 
SQUARE. 

Alderman Robinson submitted a report from the 
Committee on Paving, to whom was recommitted 
the petition of the Middlesex Railroad Company 
"for the location of the track in Haymarket 
square given to the Metropolitan Railroad Com- 
pany, Ju^ne 29, 1874," recommending the passage of 
the following : 

Ordered, That in addition to the locations here- 
tofoi'e granted to the Middlesex Railroad Com- 
pany in several of the streets of the city of Boston 
there is hereby granted and confirmed to said 
company the location of a track commencing at a 
point on Washington street, at the intersection of 
the southerly line of Merrimac street, and extend- 
ing across Haymarket square to the tracks of the 
Middlesex Railroad near the Boston & Maine 
Railroad station ; said track being shown by red 
lines between the points "A" and "B," on a plan 
drawn by Barbour & Hodges, civil engineers, dat- 
ed June 22, 1874, and deposited in the office of the 
Superintendent of Streets. This location is grant- 
ed upon condition that the said Middlesex Rail- 
road Company shall accept the same,|aud shall file 
said acceptance in writing with the City Clerk 
within thirty days after the date of the passage of , 
this order; otherwise, it shall be null and void. 

Read twice and passed. 

SALARIES OF CITY OFFICERS. 

lieport of Joint Special Vommittee on lietrench- 
ment. Alderman Fitzgerald submitted the fol- 
lowing (City Document No. 20) : 

The joint special committee appointed to inves- 
tigate the various departments of the City Gov- 
ernment, with a view of reporting what reduction 
in salaries and clerical hire may be ina|le in each 
department, without detriment t J the public ser- 
vice, and also whether any department can be 
abolished or consolidated with any other depart- 
ment, beg leave to report in part, at this time, by 
submitting herewith ordinances fixing the salaries 
of the several city officers for the ensuing year. 

The tables appended to this report show the 
amounts now paid for salaries, the amounts paid 
in former years, and the amount which will be 
saved in each department, in the item of salaries, 
if the ordinances are adopted. An examination 
of these tables will show that salaries have been 
steadily increased during the past ten years. 
Within that period the cost of living has mate- 
rially decreased, a general retrenchment of ex- 
penses in al'i kinds of business has taken place, 
and rates of pay have been considerably reduced. 
At the present time the employes of the city are, 
with some exceptions, receiving larger salaries 
than would be paid in other corporations for like 
services, and, in the opinion of your committee, 
it would work no injustice if the salaries were to 
be reduced in accordance with their recommenda- 
tion. 

In considering the question of salaries, your 
committee have endeavored to inform themselves 
of the duties of the several officers, and to fix a sal- 
ary commensurate with the services rendered. 
Heretofore only the salaries of the heads of de- 
partments have been fixed by the City Council, 
the salaries of subordinate officers, clerks and em- 
ployes being fixed by the head of the department, 
or the committee. In many instances it Is provid- 
ed by ordinance that this shall be done. Your 
committee believe that the City Council should fix 
the salaries of all persons, other than day laborers, 
who are employed in the public service; and they, 
therefore, submit their recommendation in the 
form of an ordinance, which, if adopted, will have 
the effect of amending such other ordinances as 
may conflict with it in this respect. 

As the election of city officers is at hand, it is 
expedient that the question of salaries should be 
determined. Your committee, therefore, in this 
report confine themselves, except in one or two 
instances, to that subject, and report salaries for 
the several positions as they now exist. Later on 
they will report on the question of reducing the 
number of employes, and on the other matters 
which they are directed to consider. 



They respectfully recommend the passage of 
the following ordinances. 

Respectfully submitted. 

John E. Fitzgerald. 
Lucius Slade. 
Hugh O'Briex, 
William Blaxchard. 
Robert Vose, Jk. 
Charles H. Reed. 
George B. Webster. 

jAME.-> Fagak. 

Committee. 

Following is the amount of reduction in each 
department: City Clerk, $2250; Clerk of Common 
Council, 8100; Treasury Department, $3100; Audit- 
or's Department, .^2350; Collector's Department, 
.$6900; City Engineer's Department, $2521.50; Law 
Department, $2300; Surveyor's Department, .$3324; 
East Boston Ferries, $8258; Harbor Department, 
$100; Sealers of Weights and Measures, $500; Mt. 
Hope Cemetery, $300; Registrars of Yoters, $300; 
Public Building Department, $1450; Bridges, 
$1942; Superintendent of Printing, $500 ; License 
Commissioners, $11,845; Markets,' $705; Overseers 
of the Poor, $2070; Department for the Survey 
and Inspection of Buildings, $2150; Lamp Depart- 
ment, $500; Police Department, $400; Fire De- 
partment, $5738.75; Sewer Department, $638.75; 
Health Department, $8980; Assessers' Depart- 
ment, $5790; Park Department, $750 ; City Hospi- 
tal, $760; Common and Public Grounds, $570; 
Street Department, $4463.25; City Registrar, $840; 
Public Institutions, $3560; Public Library, $2874; 
Water Department, $6334.25. Total, $95,164.50. 

City Clerk's Office. 

1876-77. Keductions. 

City Clerk ^5,000 gl.OOO 

Assistant City Clerk 2 ,000 200 

Icleik 2,000 409 

Iclerk 1,800 300 

1 clerk 1,500 150 

Other cierks 4,200 200 

Total »ie,500 82,250 

Treasury Department. 

1876-77. Keductions. 

Treasurer g6,000 ^1,000 

Cashier 3,000 500 

Bookkeeper 2,800 400 

Teller 2,000 200 

Debt and interest clerk 2,000 300 

County clerk 1,700 100 

Draft clerk 1,600 100 

Paymaster 2,500 300 

Paymaster 1,800 200 

Total »23,400 83,100 

Auditor's Department. 

1876-77. Reduction 

Auditor of Accounts •; 86.000 $1,000 

ChiefClerk 3,000 500 

Second Clerk 2,100 300 

Thii-d Clerk 1,800 200 

Fourth Clerk 1,800 200 

FifthClerk ■ 1,600 150 

Sixth Clerk 800 

Total 817,100 82,350 

Collector's Department. 

1876-77. Reduction. 

Collector 85,000 81.000 

ChiefClerk 3,000 200 

Cashier 2,600 

Department Clerk 1,800 200 

Teller 1,700 1,700 

Tax Clerk 1,600 200 

Dept. Coll. Clerk 1,600 200 

Bookkeeper 1,600 200 

16 Dep. Collectors at 81,600. . . 26,000 3,200 

Total 844,500 86,900 

The committee believe that the duties of cashier 
and teller can be perfonned by one person, and 
have so provided in the ordinance fixing the sala- 
ries for this department. 

Public BuMing Department 

1876-77.! Reduction. 

Superintendent 83,600 8400 

lA8.sistant 2,000 200 

1 Assistant 1,800 200 

1 Assistant 1.500 250 

Clerk 2,000 200 

Office bov 360 

City Architect 3,000 200 

1 Draughtmau 1,200 

1 Draughtman 1,000 

1 boy at 81 per day 313 

Total 816773 81.450 



90 



BOAUJJ OF ALDERMEN 



Martets. 

1876-77. Reduction. 

Superintendent j?2,500 S300 

Deputy Superintendent 1,500 rfou 

Weigher 780 bO 

Supt. Faneuil Hall ^00 

Asst. isupt. Faneuil Hall lo6 . .^ 

1 Day Watcliman 1,140 4o 

2 Night Watchmen at $3 2,130 

Total $8,7G6 $705 

License Commissioners. 

1876-77. Keductiou. 

3 Commissioners at S2,500.. . j!il7,500 »4.500 

1 Clerk of Board 1,700 200 

1 Asst. Clerk 750 oO 

1 Clerk in office of City Clerk. 1,200 1,200 

1 Clerk in Collector's office.... 1,200 1,200 
5 Commissioners Police at $3 

estimate 4,695 4,695 

Total S17,045 $11,845 

The committee recommend that the services of 
the clerks in the offices of the City Clerk and Col- 
lector, and also those of the Commissioners of Po- 
lice, be dispensed with. 

Law Department. 

1876-77. Reduction- 
City Solicitor »6,000 #1,000 

First Assistant o,500 500 

Second Assistant 3,000 400 

Third Assistant 2 ,500 400 

Fourth Assistant 2,000 

Clerk 1.500 ^ 

Total $18,500 $2,300 

Inspection of Buildings. 

1876-77. Reduction. 

Inspector of Buildings ^g'^SS ^^9.9. 

Clerk 2,000 200 

Assistant Inspectors, seven at ,.^_„ ^ _^„ 

$1500 each ^9'§9S ^'^^" 

Assistant Clerk _i'^ 11 

Total $16',500 $2,150 

Fire Department. 

1876-77. Keductiou. 

3 Commissioners, at $4000.... $12,000 $3,000.00 

Chief Engineer ?'?2S ?9HR 

1 Clerk of Board I,o00 150.00 

2cierks,at{|Jfg^; 2,600 250.00 

n Assistant Engineers, at 

gieoo 17,600 1,100.00 

Fire Alarm. 

Superintendent 2.500 200.00 

4 operators, at $4 per day .... 5,b|0 §?5.00 

3 repairers *'^„>; ii6.ii) 

Itoatteryman 720 

1 repairer, West Roxbury 200 . . 

1 Chief's Messenger 1,000 100.00 

3 hostlers, at $720 2,160 

Assistants — — 

Total $387,820 $5,738.75 

The committee also recommends that the tire 
boat be dispensed with, thereby effecting a saving 
of $14,000 a year. 

Health Department. 

1876-77. Reduction. 
Board of Health, three members, . 

at $4000 each. $12,000 $3,000 

Clerkof board 2,500 300 

City physician 3,000 300 

Assi stant city physician 1 ,200 100 

Inspector of Provisions 2 ,000 500 

1 Clerk 1,500 100 

2 Clerks, $1000 2,000 .... 

1 Inspector of Nuisances 1,700 200 

1 Inspector of Nuisances 1,400 200 

3 Inspectors of Nuisances, $1,300. . 3,900 600 

2 Inspectors of Nuisances, $1,200.. 2,400 300 
2 Inspectors of Nuisances, $1,100. . 2,200 200 
1 Assistant Inspector of Nuisances. 1,000 100 
6 Keepers of Urinals, etc, , from $450 

to $720 per annum 3,256 — 

Total $40,056 $5,900 

In the departments of quarantine and internal 
health a redviction of $3080has been recommended 
as follows: Port physician, $100; assistant port 
physician, $50; overseer at Gallop's Island, §100; 
captain of the quarantine boat, 1140; engineer, 
$110; mate, tlreman and cook, S300; superintend- 
ent of internal health, $300; clerks, $100; inspector 
of milk, $150; twelve foremen, $1410; three drivers 
of prison carriages, $120. 

Public Institutions. 
In this department reductions are recommended 
as follows : In the directors' office $650, as fol- 
lows: Clerk of board, $300; bookkeeper, $200; 
assistant clerk, $150. Of $400 in the pauper ex- 
penses, as follows : Settlement clerk, $200; driver 



of carriage, $150; agent, $50. In the Lunatic Hos- 
pital, $280, as follows : Assistant superintendent, 
$150; second assistant, $100; general attendant, 
$30. In the House of Correction, $850, as follows: 
Master, $400; deputy master, $200; chaplain, $200; 
clerk, $50. In the House of Industry, $000, as 
follows: Assistant superintendent, $100; chap- 
lain, $150; physician, $150; clerk, $50; engineer, 
$100; farmer, $50. In the House of Reformation, 
$300, as follows: Superintendent, $150; teacher 
of music, $150. In the almshouse at Deer Island 
no reduction is made. 

The salary of the captain of the J. Putnam 
Bradlee is reduced from $1380 to $1200, and that 
of the engineer from $1200 to $1050. 

The committee recommend that the number of 
persons employed in the department and the rates 
of pay be subject to the approval of the Commit- 
tee on Public Institutions. 

The Public Librari/. 

1876-77. Reduction. 

Superintendent $3600 $300 

Assistant Superintendent 2,500 300 

Principal Assistant 1,600 150 

Office Secretary 1,800 200 

Despatch Clerk 1,200 lOO 

Assistant Office Secretary 700 50 

-Auditor and Cashier 800 50 

The committee further recommend that the 
salaries of the following officers be reduced: 
Proof Reader, $200; Assistants, §100; Keeper 
Patent Room, $50; Assistant, $50; General Cata- 
loguer, $!50; First Cataloguer, $50; Curator, $50; 
Chief Receiving Clerk, $50; Assistant, $50; Cus- 
todian, $100; Keeper Bates Hall, $100; Assistants, 
$100; Keeper Lower Hall, $100: Assistant Keeper, 
$500; Registration Clerk, $100; Chief Janitor, $100; 
Assistant $50; Foreman of the Bindery, $100; 
First Assistant, $94; two Assistants, $80; total, 
$2874. 

The Water Dexiartment. 

1876-77. Reduction. 

Three Commissioners $10,500 $500 

Clerk of Board 2,000 200 

Water Registrar 3,000 200 

Superintendent Western Div 3.000 300 

Superintendent Eastern Div 3,500 500 

Water Registrar, Mystic Dep't 2,500 250 

Superintendent 1,800 200 

The coAmlttee also recommend the reduction 
of salaries in the following cases : First Collec- 
tion Clerk, $30; five Clerks, $1400; Inspector of 
Meters, $100; Management, $100; eight Inspectors, 
$626; Clerk in shutting-off department, $200; As- 
sistant Superintendent eastern division, $200; 
Chief Clerk, $100; Engineer at Roxbury, $150; As- 
sistant, $80; three Foremen, $450; Assistant Regis- 
trar and Clerk, $200; Assistant Superintendent, 
$200; Foreman, $78.25; total. $6334.25. The com- 
mittee is of opinion that inasmucli as the statute 
under which the board is organized provides that 
the salaries of the members shall not be dimin- 
ished during their terms of service, it would be 
for the best interests of the city if the statute 
could be so amended as to give the power of fixing 
salaries unqualifiedly into the hands of the City 
Council. 

Miscellaneous Departments. 

The salaries in the department of Overseers of 
the Poor have been reduced $2070, as follows : 
Secretary, $200: Settlement Clerk, $150; Book- 
keeper, $100; Clerk, $20 ; Visitors, $1000; Engineer, 
$150; Janitor, $150; Temporary Visitors for win- 
ter, $300. 

A reduction of the salary of the Superintendent 
of the Lamp Department has been made from 
$3300 to $2800. 

A reduction of the salary of the Chief of Police 
is proposed from $.3500 to $3300, and that of the 
Deputy from $2500 to $2300. The committee are 
of the opinion that no reduction, except as shown 
above, should be made in the pay of the present 
members of the force; but they recommend that 
the laay of all patrolmen appointed after this 
date be fixed at $2.50 per day for the first two 
years' service, $2.75 per day for the third year, and 
$3 per day for succeeding years. If this recom- 
mendation is adopted it is believed that the item 
of salaries will be reduced about $20,000 or $30,000 
per annum. 

In the Sewer Department a reduction of $638.75 
is recommended as follows : Superintendent, $300 ; 
Assistant Superintendent and Draughtsman, $165; 
First Foreman, $100; Clerk, $73.75. 

Ill the Assessors' Department a reduction of 
$5790 has been recommended as follows : Chair- 
man, $300; four Assessors, $1200; thirty-three 
First Assistants, $1650; thirty-three Second Assis- 
tants, $2640. 



FEBJbiUARY 19, 1877, 



91 



A reduction in the salary ot the clerk of the 
Park Department has been recommended from 
$ 1800 to $1150. 

In the City Hospital the salaries of the ofticers 
have been marked down $760, as follows : Super- 
intendent, $300; Steward, $200; Head Cook, $200; 
Baker, $60. 

In the Department of Common and Public 
Grounds a reduction of $570 has been advised, as 
follows: Superintendent, $300; Assistant Superin- 
tendent, $150; foreman and gardener, $60 each. 

In the Street Department a reduction of $4463.25 
has been recommended, as follows: Three com- 
missioners, $1500; clerk of board, $200; Superin- 
tendent of Streets, $400; chief clerk, $200; office 
clerks, $421.25; ten foremen, $1742. 

In the City Registrar's office a reduction of 
$840 is proposed, fis follows: City Registrar, $500; 
principal clerk, $200; three clerks, $140. 

The amount allowed for clerk hire in the office 
of the Clerk of the Common Council is reduced 
from $1200 to $1100. No change is made in the 
office of Clerk of Committees, and none in the City 
Messenger's office. 

The salary of the City Engineer is reduced from 
$5000 to $4500; principal assistant from $3300 to 
$3000; and the salaries of engineers, clerks, etc., 
a sufficient amount to effect a total reduction of 
$2521.50. 

In the Department of Bridges a reduction of 
$1942 is recommended , as follows : Salary of Su- 
perintendent ot JVIt. Washington-avenue Bridge 
reduced $200 ; Federal street, $300; Broadway, $300; 
Meridian street, $100; Charles River, $150; Con- 
gress street, $400; Warren, $150; Cambridge, West- 
ern-avenue and North Harvard-street, $50; Mai- 
den, $100; Chelsea, $192. 

The salary of Superintendent of Printing is re- 
duced from $2500 to $2000. 

The City Surveyor's salary is reduced from $3600 
to $3100; the assistants from $2300.55 to $2000; and 
other reductions are made amounting to $3324. 

The salary of the Superintendent of East Boston 
Ferries is reduced from $2500 to $2200; clerks from 
$3000 to $2700; Assistant Clerk from $1200 to 
$1050, and other reduction in salaries of ferry em- 
ployes, amounting to $8258. 

The salary of the Harbor Master is reduced from 
$1800 to $1700. and the report says the committee 
are of the opinion that the Harbor Master should 
be invested with police powers and placed in 
charge of the police boat. 

The only change proposed in the salaries of seal- 
ers of weights and measures is a reduction of $500 
in the salary of one sealer now receiving $2000. 

The salary of the Superintendent of Mt. Hope 
Cemetery is reduced from $2000 to $1700. 

The salary of the Registrars of Voters is re- 
duced from $2500 to $2400. 

Appended to the report are ordinances estab- 
lishing the salaries as indicated in the report. 
The ordinances were read once. 
Report of Joint Standinc/ Committee on Sala- 
ries. Alderman Dunbar submitted the following 
(City Doc. 22) : 

The Joint Standing Committee on Salaries beg 
leave to submit herewith orders establishing the 
salaries of the several city officers for the year be- 
ginning on the 1st day of April, 1877. The commit- 
tee, in compliance with the third section of the 
joint rules and orders, have confined themselves 
to the consideration of the salaries of elected and 
appointed officers, and have not attempted to fix 
the salaries of subordinate officers and emnloyes, 
believing that the committees in charge of 'the 
several dejjartments are competent to deal with 
that question. 

In considering this subject, the committee have 
held several meetings, and, after taking up each 
office separately, and thoroughly discussing its 
duties, they have endeavored to arrive at a just 
decision regarding the amount of salaiy appropri- 
ate therefor. 

In some cases it was manifest that a reduction 
might lie fairly made, and without detriment to 
the public service, and in such cases it has been 
so recommended in this report. Ir a great many 
instances, however, it appeared to your committee 
that the different amounts at present allowed 
could not justly be reduced, as the compensation 
was only moderate, taking into consideration in 
each case the duties and responsibilities attached 
to the office. In numerous departments these 
duties and responsibilities have been very largely 
increased within a few years, and the advanc^e in 
salaries has not been out of proportion to such in- 
crease. 
With a view of ascertaining whether the city is 



paying larger salaries to its officers than private 
corporations for corresponding services, the com- 
mittee have made inquiries, the result of which 
has satisfied them that salaried officers of the city 
are receiving no more, and in some instances not 
so much, as the officers of such corporations. 

In the Mayor's inaugural address for the pres- 
ent year^occurs the following : 

"I am not for a niggard economy — an economy 
which is mean and unworthy a community re- 
fined, educated, liberal and cosmopolitan, such' as 
. we claim and boast to be. I know the wants, 
spirit and policy of my native city. The pside and 
patriotism of her sons will supply whatever her 
safety and well-being require ; whatever the de- 
fence of her commercial, manufacturing, educa- 
tional, sanitary and other great and vital interests 
may call for; whatever her honor demands." 

Your committee think that it is pertinent to apply 
this view to this very subject of salaries, as well as 
to other important measuresunder consideration by 
this City Government. The high and almost un- 
limited credit which the city of Boston every- 
where enjoys is certainly due, in no small degree, 
to the well-known ability and integrity of its city 
officers. In passing upon this question of salaiies, 
it should be borne in mind that this standard 
should be maintained, and that in its selection of 
officers the aim of the city should be now — as it 
has been in the past— to insist on getting the very 
best. 

Your committee believe it would be mistaken 
economy for the city to enter upon a general and 
radical reduction of the salaries of officers of rec- 
ognized ability and tried integrity, and thus, per- 
haps, open the field to a grade of men who might, 
through their inability and inexperience, should 
they obtain responsible positions under the City 
Government, occasion a loss to the city greater 
than the amount saved by the reduction" of sala- 
ries. 

The general depression of all kinds of business 
and the recognized fact that business men are not 
making the profits of previous years, being some- 
times urged as I'easons for a general reduction of 
salaries, it is to be remembered that this state of 
affairs must, of necessity, prove but temporary; 
and that when business revives, and money is 
again being made, salaried officers continue at 
routine salaries, and do not partake of the general 
prosperity. These salaries have not been, and 
your committee believe are not now, considered 
to be excessive by citizens best qualified to judge 
of the question. The changes proposed in the sal- 
aries and allowances for clerk hire, established 
during the last salary year, are as follows : In- 
crease of $250 in the "salary of the clerk of com- 
mittees ; $200 in the salary of the assistant clerk of 
committees; $200 in the salary of the Third Assist- 
ant Solicitor ; $200 in the salary of the Superin- 
tendent of Public Lands. Total amount of in- 
crease, $850. 

Reductions — $500 in the salary of the City Clerk; 
$100 in the allowance for clerk hire in the office of 
the City Clerk; $1000 in the salary of the Auditor 
of Accounts; $1000 in the allowance for clerk hire 
in the office of the Auditor of Accounts: $.500 in 
the salary of the Collector of Taxes; $800 in the 
allowance for extra clerk hire in the office of the 
Collector; $100 in the salary of each Deputy Col- 
lector; $500 in the salary of the City Solicitor; 
$300 in the salary of the First Assistant Solicitor ; 
$200 in the salary of the Second As.sistant Solicitor ; 
$200 in the salary of the Fourth Assistant So- 
licitor; $400 in the salary of the Sealer of Weights 
and Measures; .$500 in the salary of Inspector of 
Buildings ; $250 in the salaries of the Assistant In- 
spectors of Buildings; $500 in the salaries of the 
Board of Fire Commissioners ; $250 in the salary 
of the Inspector of Provisions ; .$500 in the salaries 
of the Board of Health ; $;^00 in the salary of the 
Superintendent of Health ; $.500 in the salary of 
the City Registrar ; $860 in the allowance for clerk 
hire in the office of the City Registrar; $300 in the 
salary of the Superintendent of Sewers; $.300 in 
the salary of the Superintendent of Faueuil-Hall 
Market; $250 in the salary of the Deputy Suiierin- 
tendent ot Faneuil-Hall Market; $500 in the salary 
of the Superintendent of the City Hospital ; $250 
in the salaries of three of the members of the 
Board of Assessors. 

Total amount of reduction iSlG,360.()(i 

Net reduction gl5,510.00 

Resi)ectfully submitted 

George Duxbak. 
,t.\mes h. da.nfokth. 

,TOAl)UI>f K. SOCTHKI!. 

Isaac P. Clark i:. 



9a 



BOABD OF ALDIi;RM;EN, 



Appended to tbe report are the usual orders es- 
tablishing- salaries tor the year 1877-1878. The or- 
ders were read once. 

Subsequently, Alderman Fitzgerald offered an 
order — That five hundred extra copies of the re- 
port of the Joint Special Committee on the Re- 
trenchment of Municipal Expenses be printed for 
the use of the City Council. 

Alderman Clark moved to amend by authorizing 
the printing of the same number of extra copies 
ofathe report of the Joint Standing Committee on 
Salaries, which Alderman Fitzgerald accepted, 
and the order as amended was passed. Sent down. 

LICENSES. 

Alderman Fitzgerald submitted reports from 
the Committee on Licenses as follows ; 

Minors' Applications Granted — Twenty-two 
newsboys. 

Wagon Licenses Granted— George W. White & 
Co., G4-G6 Union street; Edward Pierson, 600 
Broadway; John Sweeney, 280 Third street; Wil- 
liam H. Reynolds, 2 and 4 Faneuil Hall square. 

Pawnbrokers Licensed— Ezra S. Bliss, 273 Han- 
over street; Lewis Myers, 6 Howard street (.trans- 
fer from S. S. Thorner). 

Pawnbroker's License Refused— S. Silber, 325 
Hanover street. 

Hack Licenses Granted— L. A. Noyes, Park- 
square Hotel; B. W. Xelson, Milk street, at lower 
end of the post office; Hiram Stearns, in front of 
Second Church, Boylston street. 

Billiard License Granted— Henry Schoindorf, 19 
Boylston street. 

Junk Collectors Licensed— Frank B. Stark, 1 
Hovey's court; Thomas Gentile, 140 Merrimac 
street. 

Dealer in Second-hand Clothing Licensed — 
Henry Phillips, 156 East Dover street. 

Innholder's License Granted— Bell & Johnson, 
Quincy House. 

Severally accepted. 

STONY BROOK IM.PBOVEM:E>fT. 

The following was received, read and laid on the 
table and ordered to be printed : 

To the HonorableBoardof Aldermen— The Board 
of Street Commissioners beg leave to respond 
herein to your order of April 24 last, requesting a 
report upon the matter of deepening and straight- 
ening the channel of Stony Brook from Tremont 
street in Roxbury to Forest Hills, with an approx- 
imate estimate of the cost of such improvement, 
the amount hkely to be realized in betterments, 
etc., etc. 

They looked first at the legislative acts authoriz- 
ing the work and the steps already taken under 
them by the former town of West Roxbury. They 
found that an act of 1868 permitted the town of 
West Roxbury and the city of Boston, each acting 
independently of the other, and within the limits 
of its own territory, to take the fee of land re- 
quired to widen and straighten the channel and 
deepen the bed of Stony Brook, and to assess not 
in excess of one-half the cost each upon the basis 
of its own expenditures and within its own muni- 
cipality. This did not satisfy the city of Boston, 
and it declined to proceed under the act. A fur- 
ther act of 1870 allowed the town and city to con- 
tract together that a part of the expense 
in one might be paid by the other, 
and the sum so paid used, with the 
amount expended within the boundaries of fthe 
municipality so paying, as a basis for the assess- 
ment upon the lands benefited of the cost of 
the alterations in the course of the brook therein. 
Under the latter law the city still remained inac- 
tive, but West Roxbury elected for herself a board 
of three commissioners to exercise the powers 
granted for the improvement of the brook by both 
acts referred to. Surveys were made, and by the 
several votes of Jan. 9, 1871, Dec. 10, 1872, and Dec. 
11, 18?3, strips of land covering the entire 
length of the course of the brook within 
the town, from the Boston to the Hyde 
Park boundary, were condemned by these 
commissioners for the uses specified. The 
damages to estates under these proceedings have 
been quite generally settled by the town or by the 
city since annexation. The total expenditure to 
this time, including the construction of the new 
channel under W ashington street at Forest Hills, 
the Street Commissioners find to be about $69,000. 
Since the annexation of West Roxbury to Boston, 
an act of 1874 allows the city to go on with this 
•work in substantially the same way inovided for 
in the provious acts, with the difference that the 
stream shall not be made or used as a sewer, and 
that the whole expense of the improvement may 



be assessed to the benefited lands, if they can be 
shown to have received such an extent of benefit. 

With this information the Street Commissioners 
thought it advisable to learn from the interests 
upon the stream just what course in their opinion 
the improvement of it should take, and how much 
of the Durden of its cost the improved lands would 
bear. A meeting of the land owners was called. 
A large number presented themselves, including, 
however, but a very few whose properties would 
be the most directly benefited by the reduction of 
the injurious overflows. Little of importance 
could be gathered from those who did come. 
They complained of the culverts through wh ch 
the stream passes in Roxbury as insufficient 
for the vo'.ume of water in the spring and 
after long rains. Their enlargement was the 
needed remedy. Changing the course of the 
brook above them, would help nothing if 
it were not widened. This change of course 
woula injure land owners, taking valuable land 
and leaving the naked bed of the old stream trav- 
ersing their estates, which, if discontinued to 
them, would not be worth the cost of filling. Others 
doubted if upon the completion of the new course 
the fall would be sufficient to accomplish the in- 
tended object. Upon the question of betterments 
they appeared to be of the united opinion, reached 
by various methods of reasoning, that the diffi- 
culties were of a kind that should be removed by 
the city at its own expense. A remonstrance from 
one owner against any assessment of his property 
is transmitted to you with this statement. 

The Street Commissioners were not encouraged 
to hold further meetings with the proprietors upon 
the brook. 

Leaving the matter as it was arranged by her 
Board of Commissioners within the former town- 
ship of West Roxbury, the Street Commissioners 
have looked at the course to be pursued in helping 
forward the flow of water from there to its outlet. 
Upon its arrival at Pynchon street, nothing better 
could be recommended than its transfer to that 
street, but for its almost complete pre-occupation 
with water and gas pipes and sewer. Even a reason- 
able widening of this street would not make room 
for the brook under it. The next best way seems 
to be to take it from New Heath street through 
the estates on the west side of Pynchon street at 
midway between that street and the Boston & 
Providence Railroad. In point of construction 
this is the cheapest. Estimation of land damages 
by this route is difficult. It divides the estates it 
passes through into two equal parts, and the city 
taking the fee of the lands the owners of the 
estates would be shut off from that jjart of their 
properties between the brook and the railway. 
If, however, the brook could be run undei- arches, 
with rights in the property holders to use their 
surface subject to an uninterrupted flow of water 
beneath and the entrance of the city for 
necessary repairs, undoubtedly satisfactory 
terms could be made with them. The 
only alternative the Street Commissioners 
suggest Is the improvement of the present chan- 
nel on the westerly side of the same estates where 
it now runs beside the Boston & Providence Rail- 
road. The building damages are much larger by 
this line than by the first mentioned. 

The land and building damages, in default of 
negotiation with owners, which the commission- 
ers estimate for the remainder of the brook to be 
improved between West Roxbury line and the 
Metropolitan Railroad stable on Tremont street, 
and vi'hich are all damages of that nature remain- 
ing to be paid on the course of the stream above 
the last named point, are about $53,000. The cost 
of consti'uction on the part yet to be relocated, as 
well as what remains unfinished of the part con- 
demned in West Roxbury, the Superintendent of 
Sewers places at about $80,000. 

The figures, then, are — 

Already paid for land damages and construc- 
tion in West Roxbury ^69,000 

Additional land and building damages in Old 
Roxbury ... 53,000 

Completion of construction from Hyde Pai'k 
to Tremont street 80,000 

»202.000 
The betterment to be returned is scarcely a 
matter to be now determined. The inter- 
ested parties, as the commissioners are not 
unapt to find in their legitimate province 
of street widening, can imagine only the 
minimum conceivable, if any. The inter- 
dependence of the empowering acts is such 
that the commissioners judge a legal opinion nee- 



FEBRUARY 19, 18 77 



93 



essaiy upon the amounts chargeable and their dis- 
tribution over tlie territory. At any rate, the 
completion of the enterprise and the final and ef- 
fectual relief of the lands upon the brook from 
overflow at stages of high water would enable a 
better judgment to be formed of the benefits con- 
ferred. 

As to the great benefit to that portion of the 
community gathered within its influence of the fe- 
moval from among them of so patent a source of 
discomfort and disease as au overflowing water- 
course, the commissioners do not suppose your 
honorable Board needs the slightest suggestion. 

The question of the diversion of the water in 
the brook to a long distance from its present 
course, and through another town, the Street 
Commissioners think rather one of State legisla- 
tion and engineering than for their consideration. 

By order of the Board of Street Commissioners. 
J. H. Jenkins, Clerk. 

COMMERCIAL STREET WIDENING. 

The following was received, read, laid on the 
table and ordered to be printed : 

Boston, Feb. 19, 1877. 

To the Honorable City Council— The Street Com- 
missioners have received, since their board was 
established, a yearly supply of petitions for the 
widening of Commercial street. Some also de- 
scended to them from the unfinished business of 
the honorable Council when the board succeeded 
It in laying out and widening streets. These peti- 
tions are uniformly representative of the best 
commercial class. Their object is to obtain the 
completion of the marginal avenue begun in the 
construction of Atlantic avenue, in 1868, contin- 
ued by the widening of Broad street after the 
great fire of 1872, and now needing only this 
Commercial-street widening to provide the city 
proper with a useful thoroughfare along almost 
its entire water front. Such petitions were reen- 
t'orced in 1876 by others from the people actu^ally 
engaged in business on the stieet and owners and 
occupants of the tenement buildings. They are 
urgent in their demands for relief from the ex- 
isting conditions there. The freight railroad, 
with its increasing traffic, amounts to an almost 
total exclusion of the private trucking, upon 
which their business depends, while it is imprac- 
ticable for the railway to serve many of the 
wharves itself on account of the very limited 
spaces it has in which to turn upon them. The 
injury to the inhabitation of so narrow a street 
from'the constant passage of daily and nightly 
steam-power trains is not overstated in the peti- 
tions. 

During all the time that this subject has been 
under consideration the commissioners have 
come much in contact with all the varieties of in- 
terest in it. 

In July last they thought a proper time had 
come to call all these together by public adver- 
tisement for a first expression of opinion as to the 
amount and manner of such a widening. A plan 
of the street with abutting estates was prepared 
to assist them. They could fix no line upon 
it at that time, but the wharf owners 
present generally desired that their property 
should be spared in the cutting, and the 
larger number were for a hundred feet of width. 
The meeting was adjourned until the commission- 
ers could digest the opinions they had received 
and determine from them upon a line they could 
offer for the abutters' approval. This was ready 
by November and another meeting was called for 
its exhibition. It was a modification and blend- 
ing of the various views first obtained. The be~ 
ginning was at Eastern avenue, where it intersects 
Commercial street, gradually reducing from 
one hundred feet wide to eighty by the time 
the cutting reached Clark street, and continu- 
ing through at that width. For that contin- 
uation an alternative was offered, one line 
cutting entirely upon the water side, and the other 
widening upon the water side only so far as was 
necessary to overcome the projection at Eastern 
avenue, then chauging to the land side where it 
remained till it reached the gas works, there cross- 
ing again to the wharves and thence going 
through t© the Charles River Bridge. Estimates 
submitted with the plan made the cost on the 
wharves $750,000, and on the land side $800,000, in 
eluding no grade damages. The plan met 
with little favor. The wharf owners who 
saw it were quite united against any ab- 
sorption of their wharves for street pur- 
poses. They were alreadv too shallow for 
the present business and could ill spare 



anything if a widened street was to increase it. 
There was no division upon the needful width. It 
should be 100 feet. 

The commissioners with this repetition of the 
testimon5[ in support of the greater width cut 
from the inland side of the street, took the matter 
into a second and serious consideration. They 
are, upon review of it, more and more inclined to 
the almost united public opinion upon it. Its 
commercial value is its strongest support through- 
out, and an increase in that would certainly be 
found in the widest street with undiminished 
wharfage. 

Looking to that, the commissioners have 
sketched a fresh line upon their plan, by which 
they get a hundred-feet avenue, in cont'inuatiou 
of Atlantic avenue, cutting, except in the imme- 
diate vicinity of Eastern avenue, entirely upon the 
southwesterly or inland side of the street till Char- 
ter street is reached. For the time being, it is 
thought prudent to reduce it here to sixty feet, to 
avoid the costly buildings of the Gaslight Com- 
pany in this part of the street. Other occupation 
of this land, there being at present no wharves to 
be entered from the street between Charter street 
and the bridge, will admit of a cheaper expansion 
of the street to the full 100 feet than is now pos- 
sible. 

This widening of Commercial street, in con- 
tinuation of the marginal street already 
found in Atlantic avenue, to one hun- 
dred feet on the inland side to Charter street, and 
thence to sixty feet on to the Charles River Bridge, 
including the grade damages that will occur from 
the widening on that side, the Street Commission- 
ers have approximately estimated at a round mil- 
lion of dollars. 

Tliey have conferred with the wharf owners and 
undei stand them to be willing to state to the 
board, after agreement among themselves in the 
matter, what proportion of the estimated cost 
they will pay the city in the form of betterments 
to their properties. Such information can be 
conveyed to the honorable Council, or the proper- 
ly-designated committee, upon the receipt of the 
commissioners. It has been intimated to these land 
owners that one-quarter of the above-mentioned 
estimate would be a proper proportion for them 
to return in that form. 

The commissioners would prepare themselves to 
report favorably upon this project to the honor- 
able Council, with their order for widening the 
street, for your concurrence, if it were advisable 
that the expensive surveys and preliminary exact 
estimation of the damages should be undertaken 
before your opinion had been obtained upon the 
propriety of raising such a sum of money at this 
time as is required for this purpose. 

Expressing themselves, then, as of one mind 
that the best interests of the community 
generally, and the great needs of that particular 
locality, require, in their opinion, the action they 
have herein proposed, they respectfully inquire of 
your honorable body if you will so appropriate 
such money, and desire the commissioners to send 
to you their order for widening this street. 

The Street Commissioners wish to impress upon 
the Council their opinion that the rights of the 
inhabitants imperatively demand that the proper 
steps be taken, if the Council deems it unadvisa- 
ble to widen Commercial street, to relieve the res- 
idents and business people there of the presence 
of the railway that now oppresses them. 

By order of the Board of Street CoiDmissioners. 
J. H. Jenkins, Clerk. 

AUSTIN FARM BUILDINGS. 

Alderman Clark submitted a report from the 
Committee on Finance on report and request in 
relation to Austin Farm buildings, etc., recom- 
mending the passage of an order—That the Audit- 
or of Accounts be and he hereby is authorized to 
transfer from the appropriation for House of Cor- 
rection to that for Austin Farm the sum of $5000. 
Read twice and passed— yeas 12, nays 0. Sent 
down. 

TliB PROPOSED I' ARK ON BACK BAY. 

Alderman Clark submitted a report from the 
Joint Committee on Streets, That the petition of 
Samuel N. Brown, Jr., et al., that the lot between 
Huntington avenue and St. James avenue be laid 
out as a public street or square, be referred to the 
Committee on Common and Public Grounds. 
Accepted and referred accordingly. Sent down, 

CROSS-DAM. 

Alderman Clark offered an order — That the Joint 
Standing Committee on Streets be authorized to 



94 



BOAJ^U OF AX^DKJRMEN. 



anange witli tlie Coinvnissioners of Public Lands 
of this Commonwealth for the conveyance to the 
city of the cross clam, otherwise known as Par'ker 
street, as provided in chapter 286 of the acts of the 
year 1874, upon such terms and conditions as the 
Said committee may deem best for the interest of 
the city. 
Read twice and passed. Sent down. 

BEQUEST FOB ADDITIONAL APl'BOPKIATIOX. 

Alderman O'Brien submitted a report from the 
Joint Committee on Printing, representing that 
the March draft will exhaust their appropriation. 

Items of extraordinary expenditure have been— 

For 1000 copies of Revised Ordinances $4,548.02 

For 3000 copies of Park Report (second and 

third editions) 2,116.97 

Report of Record Commissioners 842.46 

#7,507.45 
The committee request an additional appropria- 
tion of $4500 to meet the deficiency. 

Alderman O'Brien briefly explained that the 

extraordinary expenditures were ordered by the 

City Council and were not contemplated by the 

coinmittee when the estiinates were made up. 

Referred to Committee on Finance. Sent down. 

UNLICENSED DOGS. 

Aldermih Clark offered an order— That the 
Committee on Ordinances be requested to report 
an ordinance requiring that all dogs running at 
large shall be muzzled. 

Alderman Fitzgerald noioved to amend so that 
the committee would consider the expediency of 
reporting such an ordinance. 

Alderman Clark accepted the amendment, and 
the order as amended was passed. Sent down. 

STATE ALLOWANCE fOB ARMORIES. 

Alderman O'Brien offered an order— That his 
Honor the Mayor be requested to petition the 



General Court at its present session for a further 
allowance of $3300.36 for the year 1875, and «i6856.44 
for the year 1876, for rent i>f armories, in addition 
to the sums which have already been paid to the 
city on that account. Read twice and jiassed. 
Sent down, 

LANDS FORFEITED. 

Alderman O'Brien, from the Committee on Pub- 
lic Lands, submitted orders to declare forfeited 
to the city for non-fulfilment and breach of condi- 
tioiis of sale, the lot of land on Bristol and Albany 
streets, shown on plan of city lands sold, recorded 
in book 2, folio 211, which was bargained and sold 
to Josejih F. Paul, Aug. 14, 1871, and for the Su- 
perintendent of Public Lands to take possession of 
the same, and to cancel bond No. 2448 given for 
said land. Severally read twice and jjassed. Sent 
down. 

MARKET. 

Alderman Slade submitted a report from the 
Committee on Market recommending approval of 
transfer of lease of cellar 100 New Faneuil Hall 
Market by Cheney, L^pham & Co. to L. E. Pierce. 
Accepted. 

PERMITS FOB STABLES. 

Alderman Viles submitted reports from the 
Cominittee oii Health on the part of the Board — 
That leave be granted on the usual conditions to 
occupy stables by F. D. Osgood, Cedar street, 
Ward 21; John McNelly, Downer street, near Tre- 
mont; S. & R. J. Lombard, corner Canal street 
and F]-othingham avenue. Severally accepted. 

NOMINATIONS. 

Aldermaji Dunbar submitted a report from the 
Joint Special Committee to nominate Inspectors 
of Lighters, recommending the election of Ed- 
ward Hatch, chief ; .John Kenney, John G. Cadi- 
gan, William Dolan. Accepted. Sent down. 

Adjourned, on motion of Alderman Clark. 



95 



n o M M o jsr c o XT ]sr o 1 T. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Oommon Council, 

FEBRUARY 23, 1877. 



Regular meeting at 71/2 o'clock P. M., Benjamin 
Pope, President, in the chair. 

PAI>EKS FROM THE BOAKD OF ALDERMEN. 

Petitions were referred in concurrence. 

Reference to Committee on Finance of a re- 
quest of the Committee on Printing for an addi- 
tional appropriation of $4500. (City Doc. No. 23.) 
Coicurred. 

Report of reference to the Committee on Com- 
mon, etc., of petition of Samuel N. Brown, Jr., et 
al., that a certain lot of land be laid out as a pub- 
lic square. Accepted in concurrence. 

Order for Mayor to iDetitidn for further allow- 
ances of $3336 for 1875, and $6856.44 for 1876, for 
rent of armories. Read twice and passed in con- 
currence. 

Orilers that the lot of land of Joseph F. Paul, on 
Albany and Bristol streets, be forfeited to the city, 
anil for Collector to cancel the bond for said lot. 
Re 111 twice and passed in concurrence. 

Ur ler to print 500 extra copies each of the re- 
ports on Retrenchment and Salaries. (City Docs. 
20 and ii2 respectively). Read twice and passed in 
concurrence. 

Order to consider expediency of reporting an 
ordmance requirinj; dogs running at large to be 
muziled. Read twice and passed in concurrence. 

Report nnu.inating as Weighers and Inspectors 
of Lighters, Edward Hatch (Inspector in Chief), 
John Kenney, John J. Caddigan and William 
Dolan. Accepted in concurrence. 

Order to arrange with the Commissioners of 
Public LandS/-lor conveyance to the city of the 
Cross Dam, otherwise known as Parker street. 
Read twice and passed in concurrence. 

Report and order for a transfer of $5000 from 
the appropriation for House of Correction to that 
for Austin Farm. Order passed to a second read- 
lug. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Order to provide furniture tor Grammar School- 
house, Florence District; cost not to exceed .f 2000. 
Passed. Sent up. 

SECOND ASSISTANT ASSESSORS. 

The ordinance to amend an ordinance concern- 
ing the asses>ment and collection of taxes, to 
abolish the Second Assistant Assessors, was con- 
sidered under unfinished business. 

Mr. Day of Ward 4— Mr. President, last week, 
when this onler came before the Council, I ex- 
piessed a doubt in regard to the wisdom of such a 
ineasure, and since that time I have made some 
inquiries upon this subject and the impression I 
have since got fully confirms that opinion ; and I 
think, sir, that this order is one of doubtful expe- 
diency and would have a tendency to impair the 
efficiency of the Board of Assessors, and instead 
of being a measure of economy, would have an 
entirely different result than that contemplat- 
ed by the originators of the order. Now, sir, 
the principal argument that has been used in 
favor ol this project is this: "That these men, 
being chosen by the City Council, are of 
inferior quality so far as ability is con- 
cerned." Well, sir, they are chosen in the same 
way that the First Assistants are, and the same 
committee make the nominations. Now 1 submit 
this question : Is not that an acknowledgment 
that we are able to select a good board of First 
Assistants, but we are not able to select a good 
board of Second Assistants? Certainly we do not 
exhaust the list of able men by selecting thirty- 
three for these positions. Now, sir, I take it that 
.i< not a reasonable statement, and that we can 
procure just as good men on one board as on the 
other, ill talking with some of the First A>sistant 
Assessors (and I believe they are men well quali- 
fied to 3 ud>:e the merits of the case), I find they 
do not hold to the same views that the 
PrinripilAssessors are quoted as having expressed 
(and th''y claim that they have been misrepresent- 
ed in tUe ma ter) ; they take the ground that if two 
good men go together they are more apt to secure 
an equitable assessment, and are less liable to 
make mistakes besides a person tniglit be chosen 
who would be unJuly influenced in valuing prop- 
erty it it depended entirely upon his judgment; in 



support of this theory we have but to look at the 
law passed by the last Legislature in regard to the 
investment of the funds of the savings bank. It 
provides that not less than two officers of the 
bank shall examine the property before a 
loan is effected, showing the opinion of 
the Legislature upon this" very point, and 
commends the system we now have in vogue. 
If it is desired to reduce the expenses of that de- 
partment .$10,000, why not make a general reduc- 
tion in the salaries as in the other departments, 
and not by the adoption of such radical measures 
as this, especially where there is the least doubt 
of the wisdom of the proposed change ? This de- 
partment is one of the most important ones; from 
Its source is derived nearly our entire revenue, 
and the city cannot afford to adopt any experi- 
mental change which might involve the efficiency 
of the department in the least. I hope the ordi- 
nance will not pass. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 9 — Before this ordinance is 
passed it ought to be referred to the Committee 
on Ordinances in order to determine whether it is 
in proper shape or not. It is the general under- 
standing that all ordinances shall be submitted to 
the Committee on Ordinances before they are 
passed. If the Council is going to refuse to pass 
the ordinance, it would save all question on that 
point; but I move that it he referred to the Com- 
mittee on Ordinances. 

Mr. Wilbur of Ward 20 — It seems to me that it 
is hardly necessary to have this matter referred, 
and that we can decide it now and here. I think 
it can be clearly shown that it is not expedient to 
do away with the Second Assistant Assessors, and 
for many reasons. I can cite one point which has 
come under my own observation in my ward. For 
instance, last year we had two men as First As- 
sistant Assessors who were assigned to Ward 
20— one a man living in South Boston, the 
other in Ward 19 — and the Second Assist- 
ant Assessor for that ward was a gentle- 
man who has been connected with that of- 
free for the last five years. As a rule— and, I be- 
lieve, in fact, it has always been— the Second As- 
sistant Assessor has been a resident of the ward 
or district to which he has been assigned ; and for 
that reason it seems to me that he would have a 
better knowledge of the property in that ward 
than a First Assistant Assessor would have who is 
a resident of a distant ward. Then tliere 
is another point; it is not entirely the as- 
sessing or valuing of real estate that we 
are dependent upon for our revenue; it is 
largely made up of personal property, and in the 
various trades, and many of the Second Assistant 
Assessors have a knowledge of many of those 
trades in their wards. It seems to me that they 
are of value on that account, and would save per- 
haps three times— perhaps ten times— the amount 
of the salaries that they receive. Then there 
might be one Assessor going through the ward 
alone, anel an undue influence might be 
brought to bear upon him ; he might be 
influenced to favor some; but if he had 
a Second Assistant with him that would not be the 
case. I do not accuse any Assessor of doing any- 
thing wrong, but it seems to me that it would be 
a check upon the First Assistant to have a Second 
Assistant with him. The citizens of Boston 
pay forty-two per cent, of the whole taxes 
of the State; for that reason the valua- 
tion of property is a matter of vital importance 
to the people of this city, and I believe it is not a 
matter of economy to do away with these Second 
Assistant Assessors. We should see that the most 
efficient men that could possibly be got are elect- 
ed, not only tor the First, but for the Second As- 
sistants. I do not believe in the present system of 
valuing property; but I believe that the 
Second Assistants are of great value if 
we have got to have that system. I 
hope we shall not do away with the Second 
Assistants. There are many other points that 
I might cite, but I think I have cited enough, for 
I think members of the Council have looked into 
the matter enough during the past week to say 
that the abolition of the Second Assistant Assess- 
ors should not take place. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 9— In order that we may 
determine whether the Council is desirous of pass- 
ing this ordinance or not, I will withdraw the mo- 
tion to refer to the Committee on Ordinances, and 
move that the ordinance be indefinitely jjost- 
noned. If the Council votes not to indefinitely 
postpone I will renew the motion to refer. 

The motion to indefinitely postpone was declared 
carried. Mr. Webster of Ward 3 doubted the vote, 



FEBRUARY 33, 18 77. 



96 



and on motion of Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8 the 
yeas and nays were ordered. 

The motion to indefinitely postpone prevailed— 
yeas 43, nays 21 : 

Yeas — Messrs. Beeching, Brintnall, Brown, 
Buvke, Cannon, Clarke, Coe, Cox, Cross, Day, Dee, 
Doherty, Dugsran, Felt, Fernald, D. A. Flyun, Fra- 
ser, Jackson',' Kelley (Ward 3), Kelley (Ward 6), 
Kidney, Loughlin, McClusky, ftlcDouald, McGara- 
gle, Morrill, MuUane, O'Connor, O'Donnell, Per- 
ham, Pope, Pratt, Roach, Roberts, Sibley, Smar- 
don. Souther, Stone, Upham, Vose, Warren, E. R. 
Webster, Wilbur— 43. 

Nays— Messrs. Barnard, Barry, Blanchard, Blod- 
gett, Crocker, Danforth, Fagan, J. J. Flynn, Ham, 
Hibbard, Howes, Nugent, J. H. Pierce, O. H. 
Pierce, Reed, J. B. Richardson, Ruffin, SheiDard, 
Thompson, Thorndike, G. B. Webster— 21. 

Absent or not voting — Messrs. Hiscock, Mowry, 
Pearl, M. W. Richardson, Sampson, Spenceley, 
Wolcott— 7. 

ELECTIONS. 

Superintendent Of Public Buildings. Mr. Beech- 
ing- of Ward 1 moved that the Council proceed to 
an election for Superintendent of Public Build- 
ings. 

3Ir. McGaragle of Ward 8—1 should like to ask 
if the gentleman intends to go into a general elec- 
tion tonight ? If not, I shall oppose making any 
special favor and electing any special person 
tonight. I think it is best to lay all those nomina- 
tions upon the table till the Committee on Re- 
trenchment make their report. 

Mr. Beeching — I am in favor of going into a 
general election and getting rid of all these bal- 
lots on our desks. 

The Council voted to proceed to an election. 
Committee — Messrs. Shepard of Ward 4, Kelley of 
Ward 6, Barnard of Ward 24. 

Whole number of ballots 62 

Necessary to a choice 32 

James C. Tucker 59 

Charles .Jenkins 1 , 

John M. Marston 1 

.John H. Lee 1 

And Mr. Tucker was declared elected.' Sent up. 

Assessors. Mr. Flynn of Ward 13 moved to take 
from the table the nominations of city officers. 

Mr. Howes of Ward 18 — Is a motion of that kind 
proper at this time under the rule? 

The President — It is not exactly in order at this 
time. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 13— Then I move a suspen- 
sion of the rule, that I may make the motion at 
this time. 

The rule was suspended, and on motion of Mr. 
Flynn of Ward 13 the nominations were taken 
from the table. 

On motion of Mr. Flynn of Ward 13 the Council 
proceeded to an election of Assessors. 

Committee— Messrs. Felt of Ward 18, Smardon 
of Ward 10, Reed of Ward 17. 

Wh*e number of ballots 64 

Necessary for a choice 33 

Thomas Hills . , 46 

Benjamin Gushing 52 

Benjamin F. Palmer 64 

Horace Smith 31 

Thomas J. Bancroft 49 

Edward F. Robinson 31 

.Joshua S. Dunklee 27 

George S. Pendergast 13 

And one ballot containing six names, not counted. 
3[essrs. Hills, Cushing, Bancroft and Palmer 
were declared elected, and a ballot was ordered to 
fill the vacancy. 

Whole number of ballots 63 

Necessary tor a choice 32 

Horace Smith 32 

Edward A. Robinson 18 

.Joshua S. Duncklee , 7 

George S. Pendergast 5 

Edward Dunklee 1 

And one vote containing two nancies not counted. 

Mr. Smith was declared elected. Sent up. 

Mr. Beeching of Ward 1 in the chair. 

Superintendent of Streets. Committee— Messrs. 
Flynn of Ward 13, Perham ot Ward 23, Cox of 
Ward 15. 

Whole number of ballots 62 

Necessary for a choice 32 

( 'harles Harris 39 

Erpest ]'. Bowditch 7 

Ernest Bowditch 4 

E. W. Bowditch 1 

George A. Shaw 2 

John Williams 1 

Blank 2 

And there were three votes cast for ineligible 
persons ; also, one for Superintendent of Common 



and one for City Surveyor; also, one ballot with 
two names on. 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8 — Who is ineligible 
torthenfficeof Superintendent of Streets? 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 13— Members of the Com- 
mon Council. 

Mr. Harris was declared elected. Sent up. 

City Engineers. Committee — Messrs. Blodgett 
of Ward 8, Roach of Ward 7, Ham of Ward 14. 

Whole number of ballots 63 

Necessary to a choice 32 

Joseph P. Davis 60 

George A. Shaw 1 

And one blank and one for an ineligible candi- 
date. 

Mr. Davis was declared elected. Sent up. 

Superintendent of Public Lands. Committee — 
Messrs. Ruffin of Ward 9, Barnard ot Ward 24, 
Wilbur of Ward 20. 

Whole number of ballots 57 

Necessarv for a choice 29 

Robert W. Hall 52 

George A. Shaw 3 

Thomas J. Bancroft 2 

And Mr. Hall was declared elected. Sent up. 
Superintendent of Common. Seivers. Committee 
—Messrs. Webster of Ward 1, Day of Ward 4, 
Fraser of Ward fi. 

Whole number of ballots 62 

Necessary for a choice 32 

Wm. H. Bradley,,,. , 30 

Samuel L. Minot 15 

M . F. Wells 6 

Stephen H. Tarbell 2 

•John J. Short 8 

C. H. W.Wood 1 

There being no choice, a second ballot was 
ordered, on motion of Mr. Blodgett of Ward 8. 

Whole number of ballots 63 

Necessary for a choice 32 

William H. Bradley 32 

Samuel L. Mlnot 30 

JohnJ. Snort 1 

Mr. Flynn of AVard 13 — Before the result is an- 
nounced I wish to state that when I was on the 
committee to count votes on the election of Super- 
intendent of Streets there were but sixty-three 
ballots cast, and since then some gentlemen have 
left the room to my certain knowledge— Mr. Up- 
ham for one. I how move tliat the roll be called 
to verify the ballot. 

The roll was called, with the following result: 

Present — Messrs. Barnara, Barry, Beeching, 
Blanchard, Blodgett, Brintnall, Brown, Burke, 
Cannon, Clarke, Coe, Cox, Crocker, Cross, Dan- 
forth, Day, Dee, Doherty, Duggan, Fagaii, Felt, 
Fernald, D. A. Flynn, J. J. Flynn, Fraser, Ham, 
Hibbard, Howes, Jackson, Kelley (Ward 3), Kel- 
ley (Ward 6), Kidney, Loughlin, McClusky, Mc- 
Donald, McGaragle, Morrill, Mullane, INugent, 
O'Connor, O'Donnell, Perham, J. H. Pierce, O. H. 
Pierce, R. Pope, Pratt, Reed, J. B. Richardson, 
Roach, Roberts, Ruffin, Shepard, Sibley, Smar- 
don, Souther, Stone, Thompson, Thorndike, Vose, 
Warren, E. R. Webster, G. B. Webster, Wilbur 
—63. 

Absent— Messrs. HLscock, Mowry, Pearl, B, 
Pope, M. W. Richardson, Sampson, Spenceley, 
Upham, Wolcott— 9. 

Mr. Bradley was declared elected. Sent up. 

City Solicitor. Committee— Messrs. Reed of 
Ward 17, Smardon of Ward 10, Thorndike of Ward 
2. 

Whole number of ballots 60 

Necessary to a choice 31 

John P. Mealy 30 

George L. RufBn , . . 18 

George Ruffin 2 

George A.Shaw 3 

Edward J. Jenkins 2 

P. A. Collins 1 

Patrick A.Collins 1 

Timothy J. Dacey 1 

Abbie W. May 1 

George Sennott 1 

And there was no choice. 

The Chair— What is the pleasure of the Coun- 
cil? 

Mr. Ruffin of Ward 9—1 take it that it would be 
right for me to say something just at this time. 
Not that I am called upon to make any explana- 
tion, for 'f any explanation is to be made some 
other person must assume that duty. But still I 
do not want to be put in the attitude of having 
greatness thrust upon me. Now, it looks to me as 
though this was a put-up job. I think I know 
some of the parties who have engi- 
neered it, and 1 hope to get even with 
them some time. For this manifestation 



97 



COMMON COUNCIL 



of kind feeling on the part of the gentlemen of 
the Council I am extremely grateful, and I hope 
the time ■will come when they will express it in a 
different way, and that it will be of some benefit. 
I will simply remind gentlemen that a vote for me 
at this time is thrown away, as under our charter 
no one can hold an office and be paid out of the 
city treasury while a member of the City Council. 
Therefore I hope that, when we proceed to ballot 
for City Solicitor, you will cast your ballots for 
some one who is eligible. 

Mr. Thompson of Ward 9 raised the point of or- 
der that under Rule 69 the ballots cast for George 
L. Ruffin, an ineligible person, cannot be counted, 
and that Mr. Healy, having a majority of the bal- 
lots properly cast, is elected. 

The Chair — The point is not well taken. The 
Council must proceed to another ballot. 

Mr. Clarke of Ward 22—1 desire, on behalf of 
Mr. George A. Shaw, to withdraw his name. 

A second oallot was ordered, with the following 
result : 

Whole nxiniber of ballots 60 

Necessary to a choice 31 

John P. Healv 37 

P, A. Collins 9 

George A.Shaw 8 

George E. Shaw 1 

G.A. S 1 

Mary J. Blake 1 

Edward J. .Jenkins 2 

J. L. Stackpole 1 

One ballot with two names not counted. 
Mr. Healy was declared elected. Sent up. 
Mr. Pratt of "Ward 21—1 move that the remain- 
ing nominations be laid upon the table. There are 
several other nominations, the hour is late, and 
there is probably some other business to come be- 
fore the Council. 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8—1 hope the gentleman 
will not press that motion. There are but tour 
other nominations, and the elections will take but 
a very short time. 
The motion to lay on the table was lost. 
Clerk of CommUtees. Committee — Messrs. Coe 
of Ward 23, Danf orth of Ward 10, Roberts of Ward 
4. 

Whole number of ballots 60 

Necessary for a choice 31 

William H. Lee 56 

.Joseph O'Kane 3 

George A. Shaw 1 

Mr. Lee was declared elected. Sent up. 

Superintendent of Public Grounds. Commit- 
tee—Messrs. Brintnall of Ward 5, Fagan of Ward 
10, Pierce of Ward 24. 

Whole number of ballots 59 

Necessary for a choice 30 

John Galvin 48 

Avigustus P. Calder 7 

George H. Gordon 2 

W. A. Simmons 1 

W. H. Spooner 1 

And one ballot for City Solicitor. 
Mr. Galvin was declared elected. Sent up. 
Water Registrar. Committee — Messrs. Clarke of 
Ward 22, Dee of Ward 5, Stone of Ward 3. 

Whole number of ballots 54 

Necessary for a choice 28 

William F. Davis 43 

George A. Shaw 6 

P. A. Collins 4 

P. O'Doherty 1 

Mr. Davis was declared elected. Sent up. 

City Surveyor. Committee — Messrs. Burke of 
Ward 1, Brown of Ward 23, Jackson of Ward 16. 

Whole number of ballots 53 

Necessary for a choice 27 

Thomas W. Davis 46 

George A. Shaw 6 

E. W. James 1 

Mr. Davis was declared elected. Sent up. 

ADDITIONAL APPEOPRIATION FOB PUBLIC 
GKOUNDS. 

After the election of Superintendent of Streets, 
Mr. Howes of Ward 18 moved a suspension of the 
rule to enable him to submit a report which must 
go to the Committee on Finance so that the Audi- 
tor can pay certain laborers on the public grounds 
this month. 

The rule was suspended, and Mr. Howes submit- 
ted a report from the Joint Committee on Com- 
mon and Public Grounds, representing that in or- 
der to met the expenses of the department under 
their charge during the remainder of the present 
financial year, an additional appropriation of 
$6000 will be required. This sum will be needed 
principally on account of extra expense in the 
item of labor, caused by the removal of an unusual 



quantity of snow and ice from the Common, pub- 
lic grounds, etc., during the present winter. The 
Committee request that the above amount be add- 
ed to the appropriation for Common and Public 
Grounds, and recommend that the subject be re- 
ferred to the Committee on Finance. 

Mr. Howes — I have merely to add to that, 
that when the appropriation was made up, about 
a year ago, tor the Committee on Common and 
Public Grounds, I understand that the item for 
labor was based upon the idea that the wages to 
be paid would be $1.50 a day. After that, the 
Council passed a resolve that the committee be 
instructed to pay $1.75, which has since been done. 
On that account the appropriation has been ex- 
ceeded sooner than it would otherwise have been, 
and the committee call for an additional amount. 

The report was referred to the Committee on 
Finance. Sent up. 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

A request was received from the School Com- 
mittee tor an additional ai^propriation of $28,000, 
viz., $13,372 additional for fuel and salaries, §8000 
for gas and water, and $8874 for school books, to 
meet the requirements of the schools and enable 
them to close their accounts for the remainder of 
the financial year. Referred to Committee on 
Public Instruction. Sent up. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED. 

By Mr. Smardon of Ward 10— Petitions of James 
Kimmett, for compensation for injuries received 
by reason of a defect in West Springfield street, 
and of Levi W. Shaw, to be allowed the full com- 
pensation of a Second Assistant Assessor. Re- 
ferred to Committee on Claims. Sent up. 

By Mr. Dee of Ward 5— Petition of T. A. Splaine 
for a hearing on his petition now before the 
Committee on Common, etc., in relation to the 
placing of boats on the Public Garden Pond. Re- 
ferred to Joint Committee on Common. Sent up. 

CLAIMS. 

Mr. Ruffin of Ward 9 submitted a report from 
the Joint Committee on Claims, That by the pay- 
ment of $64- they have settled the claim of Eugene 
Geary for coinpensation for personal injuries 
caused by defect in the corner of Shawmut ave- 
nue and Camden street. Accepted. Sent up. 

CITY PUBLICATIONS FOB SOCIAL LAW LIBBAEY. 

Mr. Pierce of Ward 24 submitted a report from 
the Committee on Printing on the order to fur- 
nish copies of Revised Ordinances and Supple- 
ments, and bound city publications to the Social 
Law Library. That they consider this order open 
to the following objections: It provides for the 
supply of the proprietors of the Social Law Library 
not only with the Revised Ordinances and their an- 
nual Supplements, but for a perpetual supply of all 
the bound publications issued by the city or any 
board or department thereof until revoked by order 
of the City Council. Should this order pass there is 
apparently no reason why a similar order shoflld not 
pass in favor of numerous other institutions, 
making a similar application. The introduction 
of such a system of distributing the city publica- 
tions would probably soon become objectionable 
and embarrassing, involving a considerable in- 
crease of the expenditure. The committee have 
only to add that they would take pleasure in meet- 
ing the wishes of the Social Law Library 
proprietors so far as the present system may be 
applicable. The publications of the School De- 
partment are beyond the power of the order re- 
ferred to, they being at the exclusive control of 
the School Commi]ttee. The committee have 
voted that two copies of the Revised Ordinances of 
1876, and also, until otherwise ordered, two copies 
of the Annual Supplement Ordinances be sent to 
the Social Law Library, and they, therefore, re- 
spectfully report that they consider further action 
by the City Council unnecessary. Accepted. 
Sent up. 

OVEESEEBS OF POOR. 

Mr. Blancbard of Ward 2J submitted a report 
from the Joint Special Committee on the subject, 
nominating Thomas C. Amory, Samuel B. Cruft, 
George Curtis and Liverus Hull for Overseers of 
the Poor for three years. Accepted. Sent up. 

Mr. Brintnall of Ward 5 moved a suspension of 
the rule, that the Council might proceed to an 
election. 

Mr. Burke of Ward 2 — I hardly think it advisa- 
ble to ballot for Overseers of the Poor at this mo- 
ment. There don't seem to be much more than 
half of the Council. I hope gentlemen will see 
the propriety of letting it lie over. 

The Council refused to suspend the rule. 



FEBRUARY 23, 1877 



98 



COMMON COeTNCIL KEFKESHMENT BILLS. 

Mr. Felt of Ward 18 offered an order— That all 
bills for ref resbment or carriage hire incurred by 
the Common Council, the standing committees of 
the Common Council not having charge of any 
appropriation, or by individual members of the 
Common Council while engaged in the discharge 
of official duty, give the names of the persons in- 
curring the same, and, after having been approved 
by the committee or certified to by the members 
who incurred the same, the President of the Com- 
mon Council is authorized to approve the same as 
provided in the annual appropriation under the 
head of Contingent Funds, Common Council; and 
the Auditor of Accounts is authorized to allow the 
same for payment ; provided that no bill shall be 
approved by the President unless it shall be pre- 
sented to him for approval before the end of the 
month next succeeding that within which the ex- 
penses covered by such bill were incurred. 

The order was read twice and put upon its pas- 
sage. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 13 — I do not see why that or- 
der should be put in at this late hour. 1 think the 
joint rules provide for that. But there are por- 
tions of the order which I object to, and that 
is that the names of members of the City 
Council shall be put upon the bills every time 
that they are obliged to go to eat dmner 
when they are doiJig the work of the city. 
In other departments of the City Government 
—the Trustees of the Public Library, the Water 
Board, and all those different departments— they 
are not obliged to put their names upon a bill be- 
fore it is approved; and there is no reason why 
members of the City Council should be selected 
and required to have their names put upon those 
bills before they are ordered paid. It is a matter 
that I think will be as well to lie over, and I think 
that after the members of the Council have 
looked into it they will not pass it. I do not know 
■what the reasons for it are, and I move that it lie 
upon the table. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 9— I do not desire to ob- 
ject to the order lying over, if any gentleman 
wants information.' But I would state that the 
order is exactly the same as that passed last year, 
and it seems to me that so far as the mention of 
any names is concerned we ought to be will- 
ing, and it is desirable, that the names of 
parties who incur expenses should be put 
down in the records ; that if we incur 
reasonable and proper expenses we will not be 
ashamed to have our names appear; while if any 
man would incur a large expense and keep his 
name oixt of sight we do not want it possible for 
him to do it. Therefore I hope the order will pass, 
though it any gentleman desires to postpone it for 
further consideration I do not object. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 13—1 understand that this is 
already provided for in section 20 of the joint rules 
and orders : 

"No bill for refreshments or carriage hire fur- 
nished to any member of the City Government 
shall be paid, unless such bills shall specify in de- 
tail the names of the members to whom such re- 
freshments or carriages were furnished, the dates 
of furnishing the same, and have been approved 
by the presiding officer of a board, or chairman of 
a standing or special committee of the City Coun- 
cil, or of either branch thereof, duly authorized 
by vote of such committee or board, at a regular 
meeting; such bills, when so approved, shall be 
paid from the appropriation to which they are in- 
cident; and the Auditor of Accounts shall not re- 
ceive or pass any such bill for the approval of the 
Committee on Accounts, unless it has been 
approved, as provided in this and the preceding 
section." 

I thought that there was some provision made 
for it, and I do not know why the order was put in 
at this late hour. I move that it be laid upon the 
table. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 9—1 would state that the or- 
der passed last year may be found on page 57 of the 
Transcript Report of the proceedings. I think the 
gentleman will find that there is occasion for such 
an order, notwithstanding the rule which he has 
read. There was the same rule last year, and yet 
this same order was considered necessary in addi- 
tion to the rule of the Council. There was the 
same necessity then, and it was no more or less 
necessary then than now. 

Mr. Ruffln of AVard 9—1 suppose that order was 
intended to cover the expenses of committees 
having no appropriation under their control. If 
that is so I can see a necessity for passing such an 



order as that, whether the names be inserted or 
left out. 

Mr. Felt of Ward 18— In regard to the lateness 
of the hour, I would say that it was unintentienal. 
It has been introduced in the regular order of 
business, and atthefirsi opportunity. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 13—1 meant to saj[ late in the 
session. I thought it was provided for in the joint 
rules and orders. 

Mr. Felt — It came to me from the Auditor of 
Accounts. It is the first time it has come to my 
knewledge. 

The order was laid on the table. 

BEACH-STKEET WIDENING. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 13 offered an order— That his 
Honor the Mayor be and he hereby is authorized 
to release and convey to Moses Williams a parcel 
of one hundred and ninety square feet of land 
more or less— being a portion of that taken from 
said Williams's estate on Beach street to widen it 
by an order of the City Council of June 12, 1868, 
and discontinued from said street by an or- 
der of the Board of Street Commissioners 
of this 23d of February, 1877 ; and release and con- 
vey a further parcel of four square feet, more or 
less, lying under the wall adjoining the first- 
mentioned land, which was deeded by said Wil- 
liams to the city with that taken and laid out as 
part of said street and widening in 1868. The 
conveyance of these parcels of land to be upon 
the receipt from said Williams of a release and 
acquittance and discharge satisfactory to the 
City Solicitor of all damages occasioned him by 
the city on the discontinuance herein referred to. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 9— Has that order been be- 
fore any committee ? 

Mr. Flynn — It has been before the Committee oa 
Streets. 

Mr. Crocker— And approved by them? 

Mr. Flynn— The order comes from the Commit- 
tee on Streets. 

The order was read twice and passed. Sent up. 

INVESTIGATION OF OONSTABLES. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 13 offered an order— That the 
Committee on Ordinances consider the expedi- 
ency of providing by law the maximum number 
of constables to be appointed by the Mayor for 
the service of civil processes, and what rules and 
regulations are necessary to protect the public 
from the frauds and impositions practised by a 
few of these officials ; and the said committee 
have power to send for persons and papers. Read 
twice and passed. Sent up. 

ALDBRMANIC COMMITTEES TO BE JOINT COMMIT 
TEES. 

Mr. Brintnall of Ward 5 offered an order— That 
his Honor the Mayor be requested to petition 
the General Court at its present session for 
the passage of an act authorizing the fol- 
lowing-named committees to be joint committees 
of both branches of the City Government, and be 
called joint standing committees of the City 
Council, as follows: Committee on Armories, 
Bridges, Committee on County Accounts, Com- 
mittee on Faneuil Hall and County Buildings, 
Lamps, Licenses, Market, Weights and Measures, 
Committee on Paving, Committee on Police, Com- 
mittee on Sewers, Committee on Steam Engines 
and Committee on Streets. 

Referred, on motion of Mr. Brintnall, to the 
Committee on Legislative Matters. Sent up. 

SECOND ASSISTANT ASSESSORS. 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8 moved a reconsidera- 
tion of the vote indefinitely postponing the ordi- 
nance abolishing Second Assistant Assessors, hop- 
ing it would not prevail. 

Mr. Thompson of Ward 9—1 hope the Council 
will see the propriety of not acting upon this mo- 
tion at so late an hour when so few members are 
present. The question is an important one and 
should receive due consideration from the Coun- 
cil. The right to move a reconsideration is an im- 
portant one, and the moving of a reconsideration 
and hoping it will not prevail is an exception to 
our ordinary rules, and I hope it will not be prac- 
tised; I hope it will not be piessed at this late 
hour. 

Mr, McGaragle of Ward 8—1 did not happen to 
be here at the last two meetings ot the Council, 
but after reading the minutes of the proceedings 
I think this subject has been thoroughly consid- 
ered, and I think the Council are pretty well sick 
ot it; therefore I hope it will be settled tonight, 
and I hope the reconsideration will not prevail. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 10— I hope that motion 
will not be pressed to a vote tonight. This matter 



99 



COMMON oouisrciJii 



of doing away with the Second Assistant Assessors 
IS a new departure. That office has existed for a 
great many years. This ordinance was in- 
troduced two weeks ago tonight, and I 
think it has been discussed very little. 
The only argument that 1 have heard lor the abo- 
lition ot that office was that it is tilled by incom- 
petent men. It occurred to me that that was a 
very poor reason. I am not certain but that I 
shall vote for the abolition of that office. But it 
is an important matter. One branch of the City 
Council have voted in favor of it, and it is due to 
that branch, I think, that their views in the mat- 
ter should not be disposed of in a summary way 
that it seems to be desired to do here. For one, I 
hope to have an opportunity to go over it again 
and further investigate it. It is a matter of im- 
portance, and I say it is due to the other branch 
that before we dispose ot it in this summary man- 
ner, we shall have an opportunity to discuss it. 
I am not fully convinced that it ought to be abol- 
ished, and lam not certain that it ought not. I 
desire to investigate it, and I should like, to hear 
some further argument in favor of it. I hope the 
motion will not be pressed tonight. 



Mr. Thompson of Ward 9 moved to lay .the ma- 
tiou on the table. Lost. 

Mr. Pratt of Ward 21 — A motion to reconsider is 
sometimes successfully used by a majority to hold 
the minority down. Where all the' members of 
the Council are present that may 'je a fair way, 
but it does appear to me that when two-thirds 
of the members are gone, at this late hour of the 
evening to force a reconsideration upon the Coun- 
ci'. would be unfair upon that part of the Coi.ncil 
who have gone away. Therefore, I hope the mo- 
tion to reconsider will not prevail, simply to give 
fair play to those who have gone away. 

On motion of Mr. Flynn of Ward 16, the main" 
question to reconsider was ordered. 

Mr. Burke of Ward 2—1 voted for the indefinite 
postponement of the ordinance, but at the same 
time I am perfectly willing that this question 
shovxld be tried upon Its merits. I do not see the 
necessity for moving a reconsideration at this late 
hour. I believe the City Council will sustain the 
Second Assistant Assessors, but I think the ques- 
tion should be tried when we have a full house 
here. 

On motion of Mr. Thompson of AVard 9, the 
Council adjourned. 



100 



B O A R 1 J OP A L L> E I^ M E N , 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 

FEBRUARY 90/ 1877. 



Regular meeting at 4 o'clock P.M., his Honor 
the Mayor presiding. 

EXECUTIVE APPOINTMEKTS. 

Police Officers for Special Duty— G. W. Chick, 
Branch Chapel, 2029 Washington street; Edward 
. E. Foster, Old Colony Freight Depot; Edward C. 
Mitchell, Chester square; James Brennan, Oak- 
land Hall, Mattapau; Joseph Baker, Thomas 
Langdon, Charles A. Currier, office Massachusetts 
Society Prevencion Cruelty of Animals. 

Weigher of Coal— Ottswell J. Wod. 

Severally confirmed. 

PETITIONS KEFEEBED. 

To the Commiltee on Armories. Company C, 
Ninth Battalion Infantry, to change location of 
their armory to Concord street. 

7'o the Committee on Licenses. John Carr, for 
a hack stand at the Providence Railroad station ; 
Boston Society of Natural History, against peti- 
tion of L. J. Jordan for license for anatomical 
museum. 

To the Joint Committee on Assessors' JOepwt- 
ment. William L. Shearer, mortgagee, for remis- 
sion of certain taxes assessed erroneously in 1874 
and 1875. 

To the Joint Special Committee to JSlominate 
City Registrar. Rev. P. F. Ljndou et al., in favor 
of the reelection of N. A. ApoUonio as City Regis- 
trar. 

to the Joint Committee on Claims. Catherine 
McGaffigan, lor damages for personal injuries re- 
ceived by falling on an icy sidewalk near the cor- 
ner of Salem and North Bennet streets; Mary 
McNamee, for damages on account of the death 
of her husband, caused by an alleged de- 
fect in Commercial street; Ann Hemmings, to be 
compensated for personal injuries sustained by a 
tall in Fayette street; James Deshon, to be re- 
funded an amount paid for an invalid tax title on 
an estate of W. E. Woodward; James Brennan, to 
be paid for personal injuries caused by a defective 
covering of a coal-hole in a public sidewalk. 

To the Joint Committee on Fire Department. 
Fitchburg and other railroad companies, against 
the proposed discominuance of the tire boat " W. 
M. Flanders." 

To the Fire Commissioners. E. O. Shepard et 
al., that the telegraph poles on Marlborough street 
be removed. 

I'o the Committee on Lamps. William Thorn- 
ton et al., for lamps in the passageways in rear of 
Beacon street, south from Dartmouth street; 
Julius A. Palmer for lamps in Court street, rear 
of 42 Pitts street; James C. Tucker, that the loca- 
tions of the lamps on Blossom street. Ward 8, be 
rearranged; Bernard Silk et al., that Cherry 
street, Ward 20, may be lighted. 

To the Committee on Sewers. Fahius Rose, 
that a certain brook running from the Harris 
estate into the Blue-Hill avenue sewer may be 
used for drainage purposes. 

V'o the Committee on Pavmc/. Joseph Arnold et 
al., that Arnold street and a part of Weld street in 
Waid 23 be known as Corey street, of which they 
are a continuation, and that it be not called West- 
erly avenue; James Rollins er al., that said street 
be called Westerly avenue; Thomas Cunningham 
et al., that Chelsea street in Charlestown be re- 
paved; Louis N. Tucker et al., that Park street in 
Ward 23 be put in order for public travel; James 
A. Tilden et al., that South, Centre and Spring 
streets in Ward 23 be provided with side- 
walks, and be put in order for public travel; 
John Gallagher ei al., that Kneeland street be re- 
numbered between Washington and Federal 
streets; Rev. Patrick O'Beirne, for abatement of 
sidewalk tax on two estates on Circuit street; 
Alanson W. Beard and fifty-six others, to have 
Columbus avenue repaved with wood, and Henry 
S. Potter and twenty-six others in aid of the same; 
Bernard Silk et al., that Cherry street be graded; 
Sylvester Richards, to move a wooden building 
from Canal street, Ward 4, to Canal street, near 
80 Eden street. 

To the Committee on Armoties. Colonel of 
Fifth Cavalry, tor an allowance for furniture of 
headquarters. 

To the Joint Committee on Survey and Insj)ec- 



tion of Buildings. Noah Mayo, for leave to erect a 
wooden building on Maverick wharf, Ward 2. 

PAPERS FROM THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Petitions were referred in concurrence. 

A report of the School Committee for an addi- 
tional appropriation of $28,000 for salaries, etc., 
came up. Referred to Committee on Public In- 
struction. Concurred. 

Report nominating Thomas C. Amory, Samuel 
B. Cruf t, George Curtis and Liverus Hull as Over- 
seers of the Poor. Accepted in concurrence. 

Order for Committee on Ordmances to report on 
the expediency of limiting the number of Consta- 
bles to be appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen, 
and of enacting additional regulations for the 
government of those officers. Passed in concur- 
rence. 

An order proposing an api^lication to the Legis- 
lature for authority to place all matters now un- 
der the control of "the standing committees of the 
Board of Aldermen in the hands of the joint com- 
mittees of the City Council came up. Referred to 
the Committee on Legislative Matters. On motion 
of Alderman Thompson, the subject was indefinite- 
ly postponed. 

Report of inexpedient for any further action 
concerning the deposit of copies of the ordinances 
in the Suffolk Law Library. Accepted. 

Order for a release to Moses Williams of a por- 
tion of land taken to widen Beach street, and 
which has been duly discontinued. Passed in con- 
currence. 

Report that the claim of Eugene Geary for per- 
sonal injuries received on Shawmut avenue had 
been settled for sixty-four dollars. Accepted in 
concurrence. 

A request of Committee on Common for an 
additional appropriation of $6000, to pay for labo» 
in removing ice from Common, came up relerred 
to Committee on Finance. Concurred. 

Order for Committee on Public Buildings to 
provide furniture for the new schoolhouse at West 
Roxbury. Passed in concurrence. 

ELECTIONS LAID OVER. 

A certificate came up of the election by the 
other branch of William H. Bradley as Superin- 
tendent of Sewers. 

Alderman Fitzgerald — I move that it he laid on 
the table until the salaries of all these officers be 
established. I do so, as Chairman of the Commit- 
tee on Retrenchment, for the same reason that I 
have previously stated. 

Alderman Clark — I hope that motion will not 
prevail. The other branch of this Government 
have elected the heads of departments; their sala- 
ries will be established sooner or later, either at 
the same rate as now, at a reduced rate, or at an 
advanced rate. It is doing these heads of depart- 
ments a great injustice. We may not act upon the 
salary bill for three months, and the proper course 
is to elect the officers. If their salaries are cut 
down, and they do not want to serve, they can re- 
sign and we can elect others in their places. 

Alderman Fitzgerald — I make the motion now 
without repeating the reasons offered before, 
when the elections of Assessors came up. The ar- 
gument made then— and which seemed to meet 
the approbation of the Board — is the same argu- 
ment for doing it today, and I do not care to re- 
peat it. If you elect all these heads of depart- 
ments, you will have a lobby around the Council 
and the Board of Aldermen that will utterly pre- 
vent you from cutting down their salaries, but 
will rather tend to make you increase them. 

Alderman Clark called for the yeas and nays. 
The motion to table prevailed— yeas 8, naj's 4: 

Yeas- Aldermen Bieck, Fitzgerald, Gibson, 
O'Brien, Robinson, Slade, Thompson, AVilder— 8. 

Nays — Aldermen Burnham, Clark, Dunbar, 
Viles— 4. 

Certificates came up of elections of the follow- 
ing-named officers: Assessors — Thomas Hills, 
Benjamin Cushing, Thomas J. Bancroft, Benjamin 
F. Palmer, Horace Smith; City Solicitor— John P. 
Healy; Superintendent of Public Buildings- 
Thomas C. Tucker; Superintendent of Public 
Lands— Robert W. Hall; Superintendent of Com- 
mon—John Galvin; Clerk of Committees— William 
H. Lee; City Engineer— Joseph P. Davis; City 
Surveyor— Thomas W. Davis; Superintendent of 
Streets— Charles Harris; Water Registrar— Wil- 
liam F. Davis. 

Alderman Fitzgerald moved that these several 
elections be laid on the table. 

Alderman Clark— I protest, Mr. Mayor, against 
this course of proceeding ; but my protest is of no 
use, I suppose, as the vote stands eight to four. 



FEBItUARY 36, 187 7. 



101 



The elections were laid on the table. 

JAIL EXPENSES. 

A requisition was received from the Slierift' for 
§1766.97, for expenses at Suffolk County Jail for 
February. Ordered paid. 

MIDDLESEX UAILROAD. 

The Board took up the special assignment, viz. — 
Hearing on petition of the Middlesex Railroad 
Company, for the construction of tracks in Lin- 
coln street between Beach and Kneeland streets, 
thence tlirough Kneeland and South streets, to the 
station of the Old Colony Railroad. 

Charles E. Powers, President of the company, 
said the petition was for the light to go to the Old 
Colony depot, as they are now running to the Al- 
bany. The petition was presented in view of the 
petition of the South Boston road to go to the 
northern depots. If the South Boston cars go to 
the northern depots, it is but right that the Mid- 
dlesex cars should go to both the Old Colony and 
Albany depots. He read a letter from the Super- 
intendent of the Old Colony road indorsing the 
petition and stating that it would be a great con- 
venience to passengers coming in on that road. 
There was no objection to the location, even the 
South Boston road agreeing to it. Mr. Powers ex- 
plained the route proposed. None of the abutters 
owning the fee in Lincoln street, between Beach 
and Kneeland streets, object to it. If the South 
Boston road desired the Middlesex to use their 
tracks, the latter would not object. 

Mr. Crosby, for the South Boston Railroad 
Company, said that if the Middlesex road is 
willing to go over the South Boston track in 
Beach, Kneeland and South streets, the latter 
would not object; but they do oppose a continua- 
tion of the track in Lincoln street. 

Mr. Powers said he accepted the offer, and Mr. 
Crosby said he would not object. 

The subject was recommitted to the Committee 
on Paving. 

The following petitions were presented and were 
referred, in connection with the above: 

Middlesex Railroad Company, for a curve track 
at the corner of Lincoln and Beach streets, con- 
necting with tracks of the South Boston road on 
Beach street ; also for the right to enter upon and 
use the tracks of the South Boston road on Beach 
street, between Lincoln street and Federal street; 
also the right to enter upon and use the tracks of 
the Metropolitan road on said Federal street, be- 
tween Beach street and Kneeland street ; and to 
use the South Boston road's tracks in Kneeland 
and South streets. 

South Boston Railroad Company, for leave to 
unite their Federal-street tracks with the Kneel- 
and-street tracks of the Metropolitan Railroad. 

ASSESSORS' DEFAKTMEXT. 

Alderman Wilder submitted the following from 
the Joint Committee of the Assessors' Depart- 
ment : 

Report of leave to withdraw on petition of Glen- 
don Company, that tax on estate No. 4 AValden 
park be refunded. Accepted. Sent down. 

Report of leave to withdraw on petition of cor- 
poration of Beth Eil to be relieved from payment 
of tax assessed on their church edifice in Glouces- 
ter place. Accepted. Sent down. 

WOODEN BUILDINGS. 

Alderman Wilder submitted the following from 
the Joint Committee on Survey and Inspection of 
Buildings : 

Reports and orders authorizing a permit to erect 
wooden buildings by B. F.Teeling on Canal street, 
and A. Zeigler on Decatur avenue. Ward 21. Or- 
ders read twice and passed. 

HORSE RAILROAD HEARINGS. 

Alderman Robinson submitted the following 
from the Committee on Paving : 

Report and order for a hearing on Monday, 
March 19, at four o'clock P. M., on petition of 
Metropolitan Railroad, for location on Atlantic 
avenue and for a track across Dover street. 

Report and order for hearing on Monday, March 
26, at four o'clock P. M., on petition of Union 
Railroad Company, for ijerraission to go to the 
southern depots by Court, Washington, Summer 
and Beach streets, etc. 

Order passed. 

POLICE. 

Alderman Robinson submitted the following 
from the Committee on Police : 

Report recommending the approval of the by- 
laws adopted by the Boston Police Relief Associa- 
tion. Accepted, and said by-laws were approved^ 



Report that Thomas Dixon have leave to project 
a lantern at 15 Brattle square, provided it is se- 
cured in a manner satisfactory to the Inspector of 
Buiklings. Accepted. 

LICENSES. 

Alderman Fitzgerald submitted reports irom 
the Committee on Licenses, as follows: 

Minors' Applications Granted — 29 newsboys, 1 
bootblack. 

Wagon License Granted — Daniel i,ynch. Brattle 
street ; Frederic Jones, corner Brewster and Sev- 
enth streets. 

Auctioneer's License Granted— George R. Snead- 
en, 857 AVashington street (renewal). 

Common Victuallers Licensed— Kenfield & Dix, 
475 Tremont street ; James W. Peacock, 1075 Tre- 
mont street; O. H. Woodbury, 3.57 Warren street. 

Billiard License Granted— John Agnew & Co., 
382 Hanover street. 

Severally accepted. 

Report of leave to withdraw on petition of John 
Quinn, for leave to stand with one or more hacks 
at the Boston & Providence and the Old Colony 
railroad stations in this city. Accepted. 

CLAIMS. 

Alderman O'Brien submitted reports from the 
Joint Committee on Claims as follows : 

Claims Settled — William Shea, for personal in-, 
juries caused by a defect in Ruggles street, by 
payment of JJISO; Matthew O'Brien, for injuries 
received by his son caused by defect in Washing- 
ton street at the corner of Avery street, by the 
payment of .i!!75; Ann McLaughlin, for personal 
injuries caused by defect in Pleasant street, hy 
the payment of .'$200. Severally accepted. Sent 
down. 

Report of leave to withdraw on petition of 
Edward T. Spurf, to be compensated for )>ersonal 
injuries sustained by his wife from a fall on the 
sidewalk of Mead street. Accepted. Sent down. 

PUBLIC LANDS. 

Alderman O'Brien submitted the following from 
the Joint Committee on Public Lands: 

Report on petition of Thomas W. Carter, for re- 
duction of rent of wharf on Albany street. That 
the committee find upon examination that the 
wharf in question was leased to said Carter Jan. 
1, 1875, for a term of eight years at an annual rent- 
al of .$32.50, payable quarterly ; that he has ex- 
pended a large amount in iiermanent improve- 
ments; but owing to the extreme depression in 
business since the lease was given by the city, he 
has found it very difficult to meet the payments 
upon said lease as they become due, and' is ob- 
liged to ask the city a reduction of rent. The 
committee, in view of the facts herein set forth, 
are unanimous in the opinion that his request 
ought to be granted, and they recommend the 
passage of an order — That the collector be and 
he hereby is authorized to deduct from the 
amount due upon the lease, as given by Thomas 
W. Carter, dated Jan. 1, 1875, for the wharf on 
Albany street, the sum of .$16.25, upon condition 
that the amount of •?812.50 which will be due 
April 1, 1877, is paid on or before that date. Or- 
der read twice and passed. Sent down. 

Alderman O'Brien— This matter came before the 
Board last year, and we made an abatement to 
the extent of the same percentage that is now 
made. Mr. Carter is very much embarrassed, and 
unless this abatement is made, in all human 
probability the wharf will be thrown upon our 
hands, and it will be impossible to rent it even at 
the rate he is to pay for the balance of the year. 
We only re-lease it for one year; at the end of 
that year he pays his regular rent, unless some^ 
thing else turns up that will prevent it. 

The order was read twice and passed. Sent 
down. 

Report and order, That there be allowed to Ella 
Wyman the sum of $150, in full compensation for 
her loss of right in a passageway on Indiana place 
conveyed by the city to another party, and that 
the Collector be and he is hereby authorized to 
give creilit to said Ella Wyman for the said 
amount on the sum due on her bond to the city of 
Boston dated Dec. 16, 1871. Read twice and 
passed. Sent down. 

Report and order. That upon the petition of the 
St..Joliirs Universalist Parish, his Honorthe Mayor 
be and he is hereby authorized to execute to the 
said parish a confirmatory deed, drawn satisfac- 
tory to the City Solicitor, of the land intended to 
be conveyed by deed of the city of Boston dated 
May 5, 1875, and recorded with "Suffolk Deeds lili. 
1268, fol. 7— in accordance with the prayer of said 
petition. Read twice and passed. Sent doWn. 



loa 



BOARJD OF AJL.JDET1JVIEN 



Ordered, That there be allowed and paid to 
Mary A. Rosemeyer the sum of §102, the same be- 
ing the adjudged value of the parcel of land situ- 
ated on Brown street, in the Northampton-street 
District, containing 20i square feet of land, which 
was taken in the name of Jonas B. Hildi-eth, un- 
der an order dated Nov. 29, 1876, as shown upon a 
plan made by Thomas W. Davis, City Surveyor, 
dated Nov. 18, 1876, the said lot being marked "K" 
on said plan, upon the said Rosemeyer giving to 
the city a deed of said land made satisfactory to 
the City Solicitor ; the said amount to be charged 
to the appropriation for the Northampton-street 
District. Read twice and passed. Sent down. 

STABLES. 

Alderman Viles submitted reports from the 
Committee on Health on the part of the Board, on 
petitions for leave to occupy stables, as follows: 

Permits to. Occupy Stables Granted— Louis M. 
Mahn, Lamartine street. Ward 23; Michael ICe.nny, 
corner Bennett and Market streets. Ward 2.5. 

Permits to Occupy Stables Refused — Francis C. 
Creber, Dennis street. Ward 20.j 

Severally accepted. 

BRIDGES, 

Alderman Thompson offered an order— That the 
Committee on Bridges be au^thorized to coQtract 
for such lumber as may be required for repairing 
the several bridges in this city during the year 
1877, to be delivered at such times and in- such 
quantities as said committee may direct. Read 
twice and passed. 

ACCOUNTS. 

Alderman Clark offered the following: 
Ordered, That the following bills be allowed for 
payment by the Auditor of Accounts : 
Of J. E. Noyes, chargeable to House of Indus- 

trv JS195.79 

Of George Curtis, chargeable to Paving 24.60 

Of George Curtis, Northampton-street Dis- 
trict 12. 19 

Read twice and passed. Sent down. 
Ordered, That the Chairman of the Board of 
Aldermen be authorized to approve bills for ex- 
penses incurred by the Board of Aldermen and 
the standing committees of the Board not having 
charge of any appropriations ; also by individual 
members of the Board while engaged in the dis- 
charge of ofiBcial duty. The amount of said bills 
to be charged to the appropriation for Contingent 
Expenses of the Board of Aldermen. 
Read twice and passed. 

SALARIES OF CITY OFFICERS. 

Under the head of untinishedjbusiness the Board 
considered the rejjort of the Committee on Re- 
trenchment of Municipal Expenses, with thirty- 
nine ordinances establishing the salaries of the 
several city officers and eoiployes in the public 
departments. (City Doc. No. 20.) 

The question was upon passing the first ordi- 
nance fixing the Mayor's salary at $5000, etc. 

Alderman Clark— 1 move to substitute the re- 
port of the Joint Standing Committee on Salaries 
(City Doc. 22) for the report of the Committee on 
Retrenchment (City Doc. 20). 

Alderman Fitzgerald— I hope that motion will 
not prevail, though I take comfort from it, that 
my friend will even go so far. I thought he would 
oppose any retrenchment in salaries, for since he 
became a member of the Board of Aldermen he 
has been rather in favor of princely salaries, and 
of increasing, rather than decreasing, them. I 
accept it as a mark of a change of heart, although 
he does not go so far as the Committee on Re- 
trenchment. Without making any argument 
upon the merits of either report, I shall await the 
vote of the Board upon the motion, which, if it 
passes, will simply mean that this Board is op- 
posed to curtailing expenses to a certain extent, 
and you might as well leave things as they are. I 
feel so certain that the Board will not pass the 
motion that I will not waste any argument upon 
it. 

Alderman Clark — I have various objections to 
the report of the Retrenchment Committee, and 
one of the principal is that it proposes to estab- 
lish all the different salaries by ordinance. That 
is a very serious objection. In order to change 
the salary of a single individual an ordinance will 
have to be changed. Then again, while I am dis- 
posed to cut down expenditures to the lowest pos- 
sible point compatible with the best interests of 
the city, 1 think the report is too sweeping, and 
that they have entered upon duties which they 
were not called upon to perform, such as declar- 
ing what amount of help is needed in the City 



Clerk's department, and the various other depart- 
ments. If they are desirous of cutting down the 
salary of the City Clerk— which I consider very 
small for the services rendered the city, and I 
think my views are concurred in by ninety 
per cent, of the citizens of Boston — they 
can do so ; but I say they have no 
right to go into his office and say he 
needs only so many clerks, and that they are worth 
only so much per year. It has been his preroga- 
tive to fix the salaries of his employes from time 
immemorial, and that prerogative should be allow- 
ed him henceforth and forever. The City Clerk 
knows better than any joint committee of the 
City Council what is required to do the work of 
his department, and I am perfectly willing to 
trust him to say what is required; and so in the 
other departments. Take the City Engineer's 
department; the committee go there and say. You 
require so many men, and these men are worth 
only so much money. Now, if we have an Engi- 
neer who is competent to run that department, 
he is competent to say how much help he re- 
quires, what class of employes he wants, 
and what their services are worth to the 
city. The amount it is proposed to reduce 
his own salary is of perhaps small moment 
to him; but we ought not to lose sight of 
the fact that two of the most important works in 
which the city of Boston has ever been engaged — 
procuring an additional supply of water and pre- 
paring a plan for a system of improved sewerage — 
are being carried on by that department. If his 
salary is cut down I do not suppose he is going to 
resign his position; but it is a notorious fact that 
this department is run at much less expense than 
is the same department in any other city iu this 
Union of the size of Boston. A former Engineer 
of this city is now the engineer of Chicago; he re- 
ceives $6000 a year, with the privilege of earning 
twice that outside. The city of Boston last year 
paid Mr. Chesbrough $3000 for a little job of inves- 
tigating the subject of sewerage. Our City Engi- 
neer has no such privilege. We pay him the in- 
significant sum of $5000, not the fee of a first- 
class lawyer in the city of Boston for conducting a 
single case. We ought to consider that we have 
an able Engineer. We should not go into his de- 
partment and say, Mr. Engineer, you shall be al 
lowed so much help and no more ; you shall be al- 
lowed to employ a draughtsman at $5 a day, in- 
stead of $6, when the draughtsman has been 
offered $6 a day by private corporations. I think, 
Mr. Mayor, that principle is wrong. I believe the 
true policy of this Board is'to adopt the report of 
the Standing Committee on Salaries, then take 
up each department by itself and discuss 
the salaries of the various departments. It 
will be a ridiculous idea, for instance, if 
we employ a deck hand in the Ferry Department, 
to declare by ordinance that John Murphy shall 
receive for compensation as a deck hand in the 
employ of the city in East Boston the sum of $1.35 
per day; or that Bridget O'Flanagan shall receive 
37% cents a day for washing towels, or something 
of that description. It seems to me that the 
course to pursue is to fix all the salaries by order, 
as heretofore, and not by ordinance. There has 
been a great deal said about the retrenchment 
recommended by this committee; but they do not 
recommend so large a saving as the Salary Com- 
mittee did last year, and that was not a reform 
City Government either. They recommended a 
reduction of $200,000. 
Alderman Thompson— Did you go for it? 
Alderman Clark — I did not think it my duty to 
do so. I believe in employing first-class help and 
paying a living salary. That has been the policy 
of the city of Boston. We have honest heads of 
departments, and the result has been no stealing, 
no defalcations, or anything of that kind. The 
committee last year recommended a reduction of 
$200,000, but this committee recommended only 
$95,164.50. Last year a large part of the reduction 
came from the Police Department. I object to 
reducing the pay of the police. I object to going 
as far as the Retrenchment ,Committee do, and 
pay new men $2.50. If such new men are selected 
as should be, they will be of much greater service 
to the city than the men who have become too 
old to do the service the city ought 
to expect of them. I am not in favor 
— and I want it distinctly understood that 
it is not for iDolitical effect either— of a reduc- 
tion of the pay of the police and firemen. But my 
great objection to the report is that it is embod- 
ied in the shape of ordinances. Another objec- 
tion is that they have entered the departments 



FEBRUAIiY 26 



1877 



103 



and undertaken to say how much help shall be 
employed and at what pay. Theiefoie I hope the 
report will not be adopted, and that then we shall 
take up each department separately, and reduce 
or add to the salaries as the Board may determine. 
Alderman Fitzgerald— I suspected the gentle- 
man meant that he is in favor of no retrenchment 
at all; that he means to give them the retrench- 
ment report. That is the sum and sub.stance of 
the gentleman's argument. AVhy don't he come 
out tiat-footed and say he is not in favor of cut- 
ting down the salary of a single officer in and 
around City Hall? He says he does not speak for 
political effect. I haven't either. I have no aspira- 
tion to be Mayor of Boston. I don't intend to be a 
standing candidate for that position. 1 was made 
chairman of this Committee on Retrenchment; I 
have carefully considered this matter. Our com- 
mittee unanimously reported this ordinance. Some 
of the committee had been in the City Government 
two or three years. Now, the objection of the gen- 
tleman is, tirst, that we ouuht not to cut down the 
salary of the City Clerk. Let me state it to the 
credit of the City Clerk that he is the only head of 
a department around City Hall who asked that 
his salary should be out down ; he .seemed to have 
a more just estimate ot the shrinkage of real es-" 
tate and the poverty of the times than the Alder- 
man; and he asked the committee to cut down 
his salary twenty per cent., and the salaries of his 
clerks ten per cent., because he thought the times 
demanded it; and he said, in addition, that the 
fact that the registration of voters had been taken 
away from him was worth more than that to him 
in his peace of mind and freeaom from care. The 
City Clerk has been faithful to the city and 
its interests, and he says that the times 
demand that persons in and around City Hall 
shall share alike with the tradesmen, tlie me- 
chanics, the workmen, the real-estate owners and 
everybody else in the shrinkage of wages. He 
askecl for" it, and we report that the salary of the 
City Clerk should be four thousand dollars, in ac- 
cordance with his own request, and because, also, 
we saw that it was proper. So much for the City 
Clerk's Department. Now, the gentleman says 
we must pay persons liberally. 1 agree with 
him. I agree that we ought to pay a living salary 
to every man in City Hall, a decent salary; but the 
salary must be in accordance with the salaries 
paid to other people. Look around the city of 
Boston today and what do you see? Real estate 
lying idle; the taxes which go to pay for the sala- 
ries of the officials in carrying on tlie city govern- 
ment coming mainly from property which I ven- 
ture to say today, without fear of contradiction, 
does not pay an average of three to four per cent, 
on the investments throughout the city of Boston. 
The laboring men and mechanics — you see them 
applying for work; men who received from three 
to tour dollars a day, skilled mechanics who have 
considered it an insult if you suggested that they 
go to work on the streets at a dollar a day, coming 
and asking you for such work; and when they 
get any work in their trades they receive only 
half the amount they did three or four years ago. 
Now I ask, with this great decline in wages and in 
property, with the scarcity everything around, 
why should not the members of tlie City Council, 
who are the trustees of the funds of the people of 
the city, take into consideration all these facts 
and come to the conclusion that the officials who 
are working here shall at least come down to 
the salaries that ihey received five and six years 
ago, which were high at that time ? Laborers in 
the departments have been brought down to the 
salaries received before the war. The other 
officials, tue heads of the depai-tments — 1 had 
occasion to look this matter up, and found that in 
some cases the increase had been 100 percent; 
while the average increase had been seventy per 
cent, over the salaries received six years ago. You 
have a tabular statement of the salaries received 
in 18(50-01, 186,5-06, 1870-71, 1876-77; and the commit- 
tee, after carefully investigating everything, 
reported these ordinances to cut down the salaries 
in accordance not with a scale often i)ercent., 
but with what they thought light and proper; 
some are decreased twenty per cent., some ten per 
cent. They inve.stigated all the departments 
through tlie heads. The gentleman objects to 
this on the ground that it is an ordinance; 
that is not an objection at all. His objection Is 
that he does not want the whole thing; he wants 
no decrease. But then one of the arguments used 
to cover his real objection is that we have no busi- 
ness to go into the departments— the City Clerk's, 
the Engineer's and the Auditor's— and say to them 



you have clerks there whom you pay a salary of 
$1600 or $1800 today, and we want you to cut them 
down to $1200 or $1400, because from what we 
have learned outside of what men received in the 
same kind of business, we are under the impres- 
sion that you must come down also. If you have 
clerks receiving $2500 a year, and have forty appli- 
cants for the position who are able and honest 
enough to work for a little less, you must come 
down in accordance with the lowered scale of 
prices throughout the city and the country. That 
is simply what we have done; we have done 
nothing more, and we have a riglit to do it. Ex'ery 
employe at the State House today, down to 
the colored messenger in the Governor's chamber, 
if he wants an increase of salary, must go to 
the Legislature for it. Why shpuld it not be so 
here?. Why should not this City Council fix the 
salaries of all employes of the "city? Why is it 
not as competent to judge of the salary which 
should be paid to those people as anybody who is 
at the heatl of the department? 

Alderman Thompson— Does the gentleman un- 
derstand that he argued that the salaries at the 
State House were reduced ? 

Alderman Fitzgerald— I understand so. Why 
should not we do this? Are we not as competent 
as the heads of the departments ? You go to the 
head of any department and ask him. Can you 
cut down anything in clerk hire? He would say. 
No, I cannot do it. I noticed that in New York a 
committee of citizens waited upon themaj'or, and 
requested him to retrench. IJe called the heads 
of the departments together and asked them all, 
and they all answered. We cannot cut down any- 
thing. We can make no retrenchment. Now, in 
such a state of things the only thing we could do 
is just what we have done. Why did we report in 
the shape of ordinances? If it is an order it will 
have no binding force. It is only a sug- 
gestion. The Board will notice that of 
the salaries under a thousand dollars we 
have touched nothing. We have not reduced the 
laborers, the police, the flrenien — except the As- 
sistant {Engineers; clerks receiving six, seven or 
eight hundred dollars we have not touched. We 
have done differently from the committee of last 
year, because of the sad fate which befell their 
report, which was a warning to this committee. 
We simply report that which would meet the 
approbation of this Council, which we thought 
was feasible and could be carried through. We 
report it in the shape of ordinances, so that no 
head of a department, even if he wanted to do 
it, could make a salary any higher than we 
fix it. We don't say that John Jones shall 
be employed. We simply say that one clerk 
shall lie allowed at so muck salary; that 
another clerk shall be allowed and receive such 
and such a salary. If it was in the shape of an 
order, one man's pay might remain as it was, and 
another man's pay roight be allowed to suit the 
values of the head of the department, ?aid 
that we don't want to occur. For that 
reason, after looking at the salaries received 
live or ten years ago — and the same persons 
are in the departments now that were here then 
— we came to the conclusion that the salaries 
placedopposite the different clerks in the statement 
of the committee are the proper salaries to give, 
and that is the reason why we report in the shape 
of an ordinance— so that the heads of the depart- 
ments cannot put one clerk up and another down , 
and so that there shall be a fair and equitable ad- 
justment of the salaries. At the proper time I 
shall ask that the section in regard to the Over- 
seers of the Poor shal^be laid over for future con- 
sideration, because we have no control of the sala- 
ries in that department. 

A s the motion of the gentleman is not intended 
to be in the direction of the report, ancl as he is 
opposed to a retrenchment of any kind, or the 
cutting down of salaries, I hope it will not pre- 
vail. 

Alderman Thompson— Last winter I did all in 
my power to bring about some reduction in the 
expenses of the City Government. We had a 
Salary Committee in favor of i-etrenchment. and 
they reported. In one branch of the City Council 
their i;eport was adopted, but in this 'branch it 
was always 7 to 5. A majority of the City Council 
were in favor of reduction, but in consetiuence of 
non-concurrence of the two branches there was no 
reduction in salaries last year. Now. as' the ques- 
tion is upon the adoption of the report of the 
Standing Committee on Salaries, or that of the 
Retrenchment Committee, it seems to me we 
should consider the amount of time devoted l)y 



104= 



BOABD OF ALDERMEN, 



the latter to these duties, and that to ignore tliem 
now and throw tlieir report aside— when they prob- • 
ably have spent ten times the amount of time on it 
that the Salary Committee did— will not be treating 
the committee with proper respect. In regard to 
the committee going into the departments, I take 
it that their judgment is better than that of any 
member who has not gone into them and investi- 
gated their business. That is the only way you 
can reach this question. J have had the honor of 
being connected with the several committees, and 
none of the heads of those departments have 
admitted that they could make any reduction. 
When we consider that the city is paying over two 
million dollars for salaries of teachers in the pub- 
lic schools, and that the city of Philadelphia is 
paying only $900,000, how long are we going to 
thrive with such expenditures in comparison 
with other cities? When the question came 
before the School Committee last year, no 
reduction was made because the City Coun- 
cil had refused to reduce salaries; and if we 
refuse to do so they will not reduce salaries this 
year. I hope we shall take this report up and 
adopt it as a whole, and if any injustice is done 
we can right that hereafter, and we shall have ac- 
complished something. When the gentleman 
comes forward and advocates these high expendi- 
tures, and realizes the amount of taxable proper- 
ty thrown back upon the city every year because 
people cannot pay their taxes, what are we going 
to do ? Are we going to stand up here and refuse 
to reduce salaries ? I venture to say that the Com- 
mittee on Public Instruction is as respectable a 
committee as any in this city, and have recom- 
mended a retrenchment of over $100,000 in the 
salaries of teachers. Are we going to make a re- 
duction in the salaries of teachers and none in 
the other employes ? I hope the report of the Re- 
trenchment Committee will be adopted. 

Alderman G-ibson — 1 looked over the report of 
the Retrenchment Committee very carefully from 
beginning to end. I should have cut down more 
than they do, but I am willing to take the report 
as it is, provided there are no mistakes in it. It is 
travelling out of the usual course. It is the duty 
of the fathers of the city to enter into every de"- 
partment. I don't believe in letting every head of 
a department pay his clerks what he pleases ; we 
give them free latitude to pay what they please ; 
and we have np regard for the taxpayers. I pre- 
sume there is not a member of this Board but has 
had complaints from moderate taxpayers. They 
. are numerous and their property has depreciated. 
Is there any justice in paying these hijih salaries 
when our taxpayers are" not earning enough to 
pay their taxes? I say there is not employinent 
enough in the city for the people at ten cents a day. 
According to the statistics ninety-tive per cent, of 
the business men of the city have failed. A 
man drawing a salary of three or five thousand 
dollars a year has a safe Investment, and he can 
lay up his thousand dollais a year, and has not to 
trust xo the chance of losing his capital, of which 
millions upon millions have been lost by parties 
in this city. Those who draw salaries from the 
city should share a part of this burden. I hope 
we shall pass this as it is, for I should like to go 
the whole bill if there are no mistakes in it. 

Alderman Clark called for the yeas and nays. 
The motion to substitute was lost — yeas 4, nays' 8: 

Yeas — Aldermen Burnham, Clark, Dunbar, 
Viles— 4. 

Nays- Aldermen Breck, Fitzgerald, Gibson, 
O'Brien, Robinson, Slade, Thompson, Wilder — 8. 

The ordinance fixing the Mayor's salary was 
passed. • 

The several ordinances in the bill were then 
read and passed seriatim, discussion ensuing as 
reported below. 

Cittj Clerk, f 4000. 

Alderman Clark moved to make the salary 
$4500, and called for the yeas and nays. Lost — 
yeas 3, nays 9— Alderman Burnham, Clark and 
Dunbar voting yea. 

City Engineer-. $4500. 

Alderman Burnham— I move to amend section 
1, which reduces the salary to $4500, so that the 
amount will be $5000. I do that from a sense of 
sheer justice.. Every member of the City Council 
knows that the burden resting upon the City En- 
gineer is very great, and especially so this year, 
he having charge not only of the water works, 
but the system of improved sewerage. They re- 
quire an amount of time and attention for which 
even $5000 is very limited compensation. 

Alderman Thompson — I will accord to the City 
Engineer all that my friend claims for him, but 



that is no reason why his department should be 
made an exception from the other departments. 
Last year it was stated that the water works 
were in such a condition that it would not be safe 
to make a reduction, for if the City Engineer 
should resign, the city's interest in that depart- 
ment would suffer. '^Vell, sir, so far as the dif- 
ferent parts are concerned, the water works are 
about finished. Last year it was stated that it 
would not be safe to reduce the salaries of the 
License Commissioners; that they would resign. 
But they were reduced $1000, and not one resign- 
ed, and'l do not see but that the city has been the 
gainer by»$3000. We desire to be consistent, and 
I hope we shall not reduce one head of a depart- 
ment and leave another unreduced. 

Alderman Gribson — The amendment would 
crack this whole thing all to pieces. I hope it will 
go through as a whole. The committee have done 
the fair, square thing: as between receiver and 
payer. I don't believe we are so short of timber 
in this city that if the officers should see fit to re- 
. sign some one could not be got to take the place. 
If so, we stand upon a very delicate foundation. 
I should be the last to withhold any man's income, 
but they have had those salaries four or five years, 
and why sbould we continue them any longer? 
After the times get better we can put salaries 
back where they were. Give them an equal pull 
with the rest of us. The committee have done 
splendidly; I don't know how they could have 
done better. 

Alderman Clark— I fully agree with the Alder- 
man offering the amendment. We ought not to 
lose sight of the fact that it has cost the Engineer 
many years of hard labor at a low salary to be- 
come an efficient engineer. It is admitted that we 
have a competent man ; that his labor is vast and 
that a single mistake would cost the city more 
than his salary for ten years to come. He is man- 
aging two important works. I presume that if his 
salary is cut down he will not resign, for he is too 
much of a gentleman to do that, even if he is 
treated unhandsomely by the city authorities. 
Bat there is no justice in the argument that if 
you do not touch one salary you must not touch 
the others. If injustice is done by the committee 
to any city employ6 it should be righted as we pass 
theseordinances.' Doubtless there are a great many 
engineers who consider themselves competent to 
perform the duties of City Engineer, and would 
be glad to let themselves at any price you may 
choose to pay, anywhere from $1000 up. The city is 
paying for the mistakes of a former engineer, by 
rebuilding the I^ridge over Huntington avenue at 
an expense of $30,000; and other bridges will have 
to be rebuilt for the same cause. The most thriv- 
ing corporations in Boston and New England are 
those which have the most efficient men at their 
head and pay them large salaries. The Alder- 
man's [Alderman Thompson] agent at Harrisburg 
has a salary of $25,000 a year, instead of a small 
pittance of $2500. One of the most thriving cor- 
porations in Boston paid its treasurer $50,000 a 
year for many years, and it paid dividends through 

food and evil leport. The gloomy picture drawn 
y the Alderman from East Boston, of so many 
men being out of employment, does not hold good 
in all cases. Able managers, who are honest men, 
as a general thing, never have any trouble in find- 
ing good salaries. I hope the amendment will be 
adopted, and that the Engineer will receive the 
same salary he has received since he has been em- 
ployed by the city of Boston. 

Alderman Fitzgerald — The Alderman [Alderman 
Clark] always looks at salaries with the spectacles 
of Colonel Sellers, "There 's millions in it. I 
hope the board will not be misled by him. Talk- 
ing about corporations being the best managed 
who pay the highest salaries calls to my mind the 
Eastern Railroad, which paid .ijUOjOOO to its presi- 
dent, and went into bankruptcy; it has one now 
who gets less than half that and it is doing a great 
deal better. I was not surprised that people 
smiled when the Alderman said that honest men 
always get good salaries. We looked upon the 
Engineer's Department in a different light from 
any other. He is a professional man; if he had 
not been he would have been cut down to $4000. 
In 1871 he received $3000. About that time 
both he and the City Surveyor received $3000. 
Now he receives $5000 and we thought we would 
not to be taking off an enormous amount, as he 
will receive $1500 more than in 1871. He is a man 
of ability; I shall not detract from that; but he 
must come down with the rest. 

Alderman Burnham- 1 have no particular desire 
to prolong this discussion. It is not difficult to 



FKBJRQARY 26, 1877 



105 



know ho w we stand lu a vote of 9 to 3. I 
made the amendment as an act of justice, and 
I pity the man who, if he has a knowledge of the 
amovint of labor the City Engineer is doing this 
year that the City Government has put upon him, 
will lift his voice here to cut down that officer's 
salary. You, sir, did me the honor to make me 
chairman of the Committee on Improved Sewer- 
age. That duty has brought me in contact with 
the City Kngineer, and for the past four weeks I 
have gone over the ground and seen the labor that 
man is performing, with an earnest determination 
to reach bottom, and give us the facts and figures. 
In my opinion he is doing a work in that alone 
Avith at least a saving of $10,000 a year to the city. 
I do not ask that his salary be raised; but I do see 
the injustice, with an engineer of capacity, of cut- 
ting down his salary the paltry sum of .'S.'jOO. I 
cannot vote for it. 

Alderman Fitzgerald — It brings to my mind the 
fact to which everybody must hear witness who is 
associated with an official in any department. It 
is utterly impossible for a member of the City 
Government, in his capacity as a legislator, to 
clear away from his mind the partiality which 
will come over it when the particular de- 
partment with which he is specially connect- 
ed comes up for retrenchment. That was the 
difficulty which the members of the committee 
had to contend with. It was the case with my- 
self; my friend acknowledges it is the difficulty 
he is in. Each one is apt to think that the head 
of the department he is connected with should not 
be cut down because he is doing a great work. We 
cut the Engineer down only |500 oecause of his 
ability and profession. 

Alderman Gibson — The Alderman speaks of 
Huntington-avenue bridge. It is well known what 
our former engineer was. That bridge was built 
tor the Coliseum ; they worked on it night and day, 
and the work was shabbily done. I know several 
parties who made considerable money out of it. 

Alderman Burnham— If we put the salary at 
$4500, and discharge our City Engineer, it is said 
we could easily find another. That is very true. 
"We have already spent $100,000 for a new draw in 
Broadway bridge, and the Committee on Bridges 
have already under contemplation another large 
expenditure. That is the kind of engineering we 
shall have if we discharge this able engineer and 
put in his place a man at four or five thousand 
dollars. 

Alderman Burnham's amendment was lost- 
yeas 5, nays 7. 

Yeas — Aldermen Burnham, Clark, Dunbar, 
Viles, Wilder-5. 

>rays— Aldermen Breck, Fitzgerald, Gibson, 
O'Brien, Robinson, Slade, Thompson— 7. 

'City Solicitor. Alderman Fitzgerald oftei-ed an 
amendment to correct a clerical error, so that the 
salaries given to the Third and Fourth Assistants 
should be reversed. It was adopted. 

Alderman Clark moved to amend by making the 
City Solicitor's salary §6000, the First Assistant's 
$3500, as now. There is no occasion, he said, to 
speak of the qualifications Of our City Solicitor, 
who has been the legal adviser of the city for so 
many years, or of the First Assistant. Mr. Stack- 
pole, who was the Frst Assistant, resigned last year 
and entered upon private practice, probably be 
cause lie finds it much more lucrative than to re- 
main in the employ of the city. He is employed 
by the city now, and attending to matters at the 
State House, and will probably be paid as much 
as he used to receive for the whole year. If we 
want a competent legal adviser, he is entitled 
to receive $6000 a year. If he is not worth that he 
is not the man we should have for City Solicitor. 
I have no doubt the Second Assistant deserves all 
he receives at present. I know that first-class 
lawyers can hardly come before the Committee on 
Streets and ask "tor an abatement of betterment 
or an increase of damages unless he gets 
$100 or so for a few minutes. I am 
informed by Alderman Thompson that the corpo- 
ration of which he is a member has an agent in 
Harrisburg— where it costs nothing to live 
compared with Boston— who receives .510,000 
a year, and that they only turn out 
about $4,000,000 worth of steel rails a 
year; and that the agent of that com- 
pany receives $.5000 a year for work that does not 
take him an hour a day. Now, you propose to pay 
our City Auditor, Treasurer and Collector less 
than is paid the agent of that corporation, when 
they have greater respon.sibility. 

Alderman Thompson— I think the gentleman's 
remarks are a little ironical. 



The amendment was rejected— yeas 4, nays 8 — 
Alderman Burnham, Clark, Dunbar and Viles vot- 
ing yea. 

City Surveyor. This ordinance was amended, 
on motion of Alderman O'Brien, by striking out 
the section relating to Assistant City Surveyor, as 
there is no such office. 

Alderman Fitzgerald said it was merely a cleri- 
cal correction. 

East Hoston Ferries. Alderman Clark asked 
for an expression of opinion from Alderman Gib- 
son on the proposed reductions in this depart- 
ment, saying he would be guided by his judgment 
in this matter. 

Alderman Gibson said the directors had intend- 
ed to take hold of the matter and cut down, but 
had waited tor the committee to report. He did 
not like all the reductions, and some were not re- 
duced enough, but he would not object. He 
thought the captains were cut more in proportion 
than the captain of the J. P. Bradlee, as they are 
on duty night and day and have greater responsi- 
bility. 

Superintendent of Printlnfj. $2000. Alderman 
Clark — It seems tome that an injustice is done 
here. I understand that the present Superintend 
ent saves the city some $15,000 or $20,000 a year. 
The department is very economically run. I move 
that the salary be $2600. 

Alderman Thompson— I wish to inform the 
Alderman that although the Superintendent of 
Printing saves the city a great deal of money, the 
Directors for Public Institutions propose to save a 
great deal more by having the printing done at 
Deer Island. Under those circumstances I don't 
think the change will be wise. 

Alderman Clark— 1 should like to hear from the 
Chairman of the Committee on Printing. He is 
unusually quiet this afternoon. I am inclined to 
think that he will agree with me that the Super- 
intendent is an efficient and faithful public ser- 
vant, and that $2500 a year is small enough. 

Alderman O'Brien— I can bear testimony to the 
faithful service of our Superintendent of Print- 
ing. He accomplishes a great deal of good work 
for the city, but no more than fifty other gentle- 
men can who have made application to him for 
that position, and would be perfectly will- 
ing to take it at $2000 a year, which I 
will say is a pretty good salary for a 
printer. Although I have the highest re- 
spect for the Superintendent, I think that 
$2000 will be ample salary for any man who tills 
that position. As to the remark made by the Al- 
dermanfrom Charlestown,he would state the jjrint- 
ing is to be done hereafter at Deer Island. I have 
no doubt that very fine printers of the highest 
type often eft'ect an entrance into Deer Island. 
Good printers very often get there. But I doubt 
very much whether the directors will have ac- 
complished what the Alderman says. 

Alderman Thompson — In visiting the institu- 
tions last week, I was very much pleased to be 
notified by the president of the Board of Directors 
that they were going to introduce that trade down 
to the island, and they are going to educate the 
boys in the printing trade, and the president had 
no doubt that during the coming year all the 
printing of the city would be done down there. 
That is my authority for making the remark. 

Alderman O'Brien — In relation to the remark 
that 1 am unusually quiet this afternoon, I would 
say that I have fought all these matters in com- 
mittee, and having introduced the report I am not 
going to stand up in any other way than to defend 
it. Ot course not. When I went into that com- 
mittee I went bound by its decision. There are 
many things in this report that I do not like; 
many that I would like to alter; quite a number I 
would like to reduce ; but I fought all these things 
in committee and I am not going over it again in 
this Board. 

Alderman Clark— I withdraw the amendment 
after the explanation of the Chairman of the 
Committee on Printing. 

Licen.se Coimnissioners. $1000. Alderman Clark 
— I should like an explanation from the commit- 
tee why such an enormous reduction has been 
made in the salaries of the License Commis- 
sioners ? 

Alderman Fitzgerald— I happened to he a mem- 
ber of the (Jouncil when the salaries of the License 
Commissioners were first established, and any 
member who was present will bear testimony that 
no man did more tnan 1 to make the salaries of 
the License Commissioners what they were. I 
was under the impression that the work would be 
arduous, that there would l)e continual hearings 



106 



BOARIJ OF ALDEKMEN 



before them in regard to revoking licenses M'liich 
they had granted, and I thought their time 
would be oceuiJied from morning till night. It 
has been in operation two years, and I must con- 
fess that I have come to the conclusion that the 
man vrho can be a banker, a commission mer- 
chant, and go for a few hours in a day and perform 
the duties of a License Commissioner besides, 
will be sufficiently paid at $1000 a year. 
I think I can get three responsible men 
in the city of Boston to take that position 
for that sum, and you will get better men without 
any salary. They are not like heads of depart- 
ments ; they can attend to their own business be- 
sides performing these duties. It will be an hon- 
orable position even if it is an autocratic one. The 
salarj' is more in proportion than others receive, 
when you consider the hours they work. 1 should 
cut them down to nothing: but as Alderman 
O'Brien said, we are a compromise committee. 
Every member had his ideas abovit salaries, and it 
was only by mutual concessions that we made this 
report. I should not give a cent to the License 
Commissioners if I had my way. 

Alderman Clark — That is just tne explanation I 
wanted. It has been suggested that the city take 
charge of the matter, appoint their own commis- 
sioners and iix their pay. I know that the License 
Commissioners have turned into the City Treasury 
alargeamountof money, and if they have discharg- 
ed their duties as employes of the city and l)een 
enabled to run their own business besides, they 
must have been men of unusual ability, and I 
trust that in the future we shall lie able to lind 
men as efficient as they have been. If, however, 
we can find men to take that duty for nothing I 
shall be glad of it. 

Alderman Fitzgerald — I wish to correct the gen- 
tleman's impression that they are men of gVeat 
ability from the fact that they discharge their 
duties as commissioners and attend to their own 
duties. Their duties occupy them only a few 
hours a day, and they can give up their time 
substantially to their own ordinary occupa- 
tions. The committee were not in favor of abol- 
ishing this office, but of retaining it. They were 
not in favor of giving this duty back to the Board 
of Aldermen, but they thought the Commissioners 
can perform their duties efficiently under this 
ordiiiance, and that we can get men to do them 
for this salary. The duties are not severe, and 
they have not been, except for one or two mouths 
in the year — May and June. 

Overseers of the Poor. On motion of Alderman 
Fitzgerald, the ordinance in relation to Overseers 
of the Poor was indefinitely postponed, he stating 
that the statutes gave that Board power to fix the 
salaries of the employes. 

Police Department. Alderman Clark— I hope 
no discrimination will be made in the salaries of 
the old and new patrolmen. I move to strike out 
section 8 [fixing pay of new patrolmen at $2.50 per 
day]. I can see no reason why men who are ap- 
pointed by you, sir, shall not receive the same pay 
as those appointed by your predecessors. If such 
men are put into the' department as should be I 
see no reason why they should not receive the 
same pay as the old men. It will create ill-feeling 
in the department. There may be a good many 
discharges, and of 1000 men one half may receive 
$2.50 a day and the other half $3. I hope they 
will all receive what they honestly earn — $3 a day. 

Alderman Gibson — The new men are appren- 
tices, so to speak. A man appointed today is not 
able to perform the same duty that those are who 
iiave had years of experience. An apprentice 
should not get first-class pay. I think this de- 
l>artment ought to be reached in some shape or 
the other. I had a different way, but will com- 
promise in order to carry this through. Some new 
men are timid when they get a uniform on; some 
are proud, and some don't work into the harness 
like the old men do. I thing $2.50 is enough for 
the new men, and the old men are not worth 
half they get. There are many old men in the 
department who are good for nothing, and the 
city continues their salaries ; yet no one speaks of 
the worn-out laborer in sympathy. 

Alderman Burnham— I am inclined to favor the 
amendment, because fi'om the uncertainty that 
hangs round this matter. We may not be doing 
the right thing. The only legal gentleman at this 
Board confesses that he made the greatest mis- 
take two years ago that he ever made by advocat- 
ing a certain salary for the License Commission- 
ers. 

Alderman Fitzgerald— No, I did not. 

Alderman Buinham— I beg pardon. Still he 



made a great mistake. There seems to be so 
little evidence that we are doing right in this mat- 
ter that I shall favor the amendment. 

Alderman Fitzgerald — We should be governed 
by experience. My action in regard to the com- 
missioners was based on the supposition that they 
were to perform an immense amount of work, which 
in reality they never performed. Experience has 
shown that I was wrong. The law of supply and de- 
mand governs the Police Department as well as 
everything else ; a new man draws the same pay as 
an experienced officer, when he cannot pei'iorm 
the same duty. The school teachers receive $600 
the first year, $700 the next and $800 the third ; 
and so of the ushers, sub-masters and mas- 
ters. Why should it not be so of the 
police? Is it not an injustice to pay 
a newly-appointed man who knows nothing of the 
business, as much as one who has had years of ex- 
perience? I think the conclusion is a wise one. 
The salary of new men will be $17.50 a week the 
first year— not a very bad salary. I would take a 
contract to supply the whole Police Department 
at that rate with good, efficient, intelligent men. 

Alderman Clark— And that is the class of men 
he proposes to pay $2.50 while he pays men who 
have been in the department six or twelve months 
$3 a day. I agree that there never was a time 
when you could get so many intelligent 
men as at present. I contend that if 
a man has brains enough to entitle him 
to an appointment on the police, he can 
learn his duty in sixty days so as to be per- 
fectly conversant with it and become as able and 
efficient as the generality of those in the depart- 
ment. It is doing a great injustice to make this 
discrimination when you propose to fill up the 
department with the class of men spoken of by 
the Alderman. 

Alderman Clark called for the yeas and nays, 
and the amendment was rejected — yeas 3, nays 9 
— Alderman Burnham, Clark and Dunbar voting- 
yea. 

/Superintendent of Pullic Grounds, ^2200. Al- 
derman Clark— I move to make this salary $2500. 
This salary has never been as high in proportion 
as those of other superintendents. He has a large 
pi'operty to look after, especially during the spring, 
summer and autumn months, and he is constantly 
employed. His salary has never been over $2500 a 
year. If the officer is competent it is a great in- 
justice to reduce his salary. 

The amendment was lost — yeas 3, nays 9, as be- 
fore. 

All the ordinances were passed. 

A motion to reconsider, by Alderman Fitzger- 
ald, was lost after a brief discussion by Alderman 
Clark in favor, and Alderman Thompson opposed. 

SINKING FUNns. 

On motion of Alderman Fitzgerald, the Board 
took from the table the report and ordinance to 
amend ordinance in relation to finance, so that 
unexpended balances at the close of the financial 
year shall be carried over to the credit of the sev- 
eral appropriations for the next financial year. 

The question was on the passage of the ordi- 
nance. 

Alderman Clark— At the last uieeting of the 
Board I endeavored to have this subject referred 
to the Committee on Finance, because I believed 
it too important a subject to be passed over lightly 
without being thoroughly understood. I di(l not 
succeed in having it referred to the proper com- 
mittee, but it was laid upon the table, and during 
the week I have had an opportunity to look into 
the subject. I still believe that it is a proper sub- 
ject to be referred to the Finance Committee; but 
as the Board has declined to do that, I have pre- 
pared a few remarks which I propose, with the 
permission of the Board, to read. 

The question involved in the repeal of that por- 
tion of the ordinance on finance which provides 
that the unexpended balances of appropriations 
shall annually be paid to the Sinking Fund Com- 
missioners, aiid to be by them used in lieu of 
direct taxation of the percentages on the debt re- 
quired by law, is whether there will be sufficient 
moneys received from betterments, sales of land, 
etc., by the commissioners, for that purpose, dur- 
ing the coming financial year, provided the com- 
missioners cease paying debt before maturity with 
said revenue. I shall show, further i>n, that it 
will not, and that the commissioners will require 
a direct tax to fulfil the requirements of the law. 
The Debt of the City. 

Before proceeding to show this fact, I ask the 
Board to pause a moment and give their attention 



FKBRUARY 26 



18 77. 



107 



to the following exhibit of the conrlition of the 
debt of the city of Boston at this date, compared 
with that of the same April 30, 1867, ten years 
since; also as applied to the valuation and popula- 
tion of the city at the respective dates : 





Funded Debt 




18U7. 




1877. 


)S14,011,G5(5.91 


Valuation. 


,i!44.590,672.30 


1867. 




1877. 


!?4 44,926,100. 


Population. 


»748,878,100. 


1867. 




1877. 


192,324. 




341,919. 



The funded debt, less the means on hand for 
paying- the same, was, in 18G7, $8,812,287.19; m 1877, 
§27,977,573.48. The means in 1877 consists of, Sink- 
ing Funds, $15,735,964.40; bonds in the hands of 
the Collector, the payment on which is to go to 
the Sinking Fund Commissioners, .§877,134.42. 

The gross debt to each inhabitant in 1867 was 
$72.85. 

The gross debt to each inhabitant in 1877 was 
.flSl.ll. 

In 1867 the valuation of the city was 31 75-100 
times as nmch as the debt. In 1877 the valuation 
of the city was 16 75-100 as much as the debt. 

The debt, less the means on hand for paying the 
same in 1867, to each inhabitant, was $45.82. The 
debt, less tlie means on hand for paying the same 
in 1877, to each inhabitant, is $81.82. In 1867 the 
valuation of the city was 501^ times as much as 
the debt, less the means lor paying the same. 

In 1877 the valuation of the city is 26 79-100 times 
as much as the debt, less the means for paying 
the same. Total amount of debt then existing, 
and created since the organization of the Board 
of Sinking Fund Commissioners in 1870, to this 
date, is $51,780,032.51 ; paid and extinguished dur- 
ing the period of six years, $7,189,360.21. Total 
gi-oss deht outstanding, as before stated, $44,590,- 
672.30. 

These are stubborn facts, and show that, not- 
withstanding the paying oft' of debt before matu- 
rity at par, and not at a premium, by the Sinking 
Fund Commissioners, as set forth by my friends 
on the Retrenchment Committee, a great debt is 
to be paid, and well may be a cause for careful 
watchfulness on our part as to impairing in the 
least the means for paying the same. 

I do not wish to be understood, however, that 
the indebtedness incurred during the past ten 
years was not necessary and called for. It was in- 
curred for demanded improvements, some of 
which, while holding a seat at this Board, I have 
voted for, such as the improvement of the streets 
on the burnt district, the extension of Washing- 
ton street, and for an additional supply of water; 
but the figures which I have given I think show 
most conclusively that the Board of Sinking Fund 
Commissioneis have acted wisely in reducing our 
indebtedness by purchasing and cancelling debt 
at par before maturity,] with revenue received and 
set apart for that purpose, and which formed no 
part of the Sinking Funds. 

Now, as to paying the debt before maturity, I 
wish to say a few words : That policy was inaugu- 
rated by the establishment of the present Board 
of Sinking Fund Commissioners, by the ordinance 
of the City Council of December, 1870, going into 
effect in January, 1871. Before that date the 
means for the redemption of the debt were in 
charge of the Committee on the Reduction of the 
City Debt, consisting of the Mayor, President of 
the Common Council, and the chairman of the 
Committee on Finance on the part of the Common 
Council, with the Auditor as its secretary. 

The establishment of the present board by its 
advocates was for the very purpose that the debt 
of the city should be lessened as revenue came in 
from betterments and all other sources, rather 
than from the interest on invested funds and the 
percentages taxed. The reasons for so doing, and 
they appear to me sound, were that in all cases of 
street improvements and those of a like nature 
the city had to borrow a larger amount of money 
for each improvement than its actual cost in pur- 
chasing surrendered estate." and whole estates, 
when only parts were needed for the widening of 
streets, and that in consequence of these improve- 
ments made, betterments would be assessed; 
therefore that the moneys received from these 
s(mrces should in each case purchase and cancel 
the debt of each specific loan, instead of swelling 
the Sinking Fund and leaving outstanding an enor- 
mous debt for years, which in each case would not 
represent the actual cost of the improvement. 
The fact is, the city only advanced the money, and 



as fast as the commissioners received it they paid 
it back. 

Possibly it might have been better to have only 
issued a loan for a long tenn of years for the cost 
of an improvement, less the estimated receipts 
from betterments and sales of surrendered estates, 
and then borrowed the remainder only for a short 
term to cover so much as could be estimated to 
be received from those betterments and j-ales of 
lands. But as these sums are so indelinite at the 
time of borrowing the money, we do not see that 
the policy which has been pursued of canr'elling 
the long bonds has not met the case equally as 
well. Be it remembered that the revenue so re- 
ceived forms no part of the Sinking Fund, but is 
money received and immediately paid out for the 
purpose of cancelling debt. Mark well the point, 
— the moneys so received formed no part of a sink- 
ing fund, but as soon as received by the commis- 
sioners were applied to purchasing and cancelling 
debt. 

This is the principal debt which has bee)- paid 
before maturity, and cancelled with the aforesaid 
revenue, and not from the Sinking Fund means, 
and to illustrate I may mention the following 
amounts paid and cancelled since 1870: 

Burnt District §704,500 

Suffolk-street District 698,000 

Washington-street Extension 215,000 

Sundry street improvements 700,000 

82,317,500 
a saving annually to the taxpayer of $139,050 on 
interest account. 

At this point I will proceed to give a brief his- 
tory of the several Sinking Funds as established at 
the i^resent time. 

The City Sinking Jb'unds. 

These funds are now known upon the books of 
the Commissioners of the Sinking Funds as the 
"Old Sinking Fund," "The Consolidated Street 
ImiDrovement Sinking Fund," "The Cochituate 
Water Sinking Fund." "TheMystic Water Sinking 
Fund," "The Burnt District Sinking Fund," and 
"The New Sinking Fund." 

The Old Sinking Fund. 

This is the first fund established by the City 
Council, and with the exception of the Consoli- 
dated Street Fund, was the only one in existence 
up to the close of the year 1870. Its sources of in- 
come were the annual tax of three per cent, on the 
gross debt, the proceeds of sale of all city lands, 
all betterments from street widenings, all unex- 
pended balances of appropriations, and all excess 
of revenue over estimates at the close of each finan- 
cial year. Thus , if any part of the appropriation for 
Paving, Schools, Police, or any other department 
of the city, at the beginning of the financial year 
is unexpended at the close of the year, such sums 
are called "unexpended balances." The City 
Council at the beginning of each financial year 
also makes an estimate of the amount that will be 
received from unpaid taxes of previous years, 
rents of buildings owned by the city, the receipts 
of departments doing work for individuals, etc., 
the items of which are to be found in the Audi- 
tor's estimates, and the sum so estimated is de- 
ducted from the tax levy; but, if any excess over 
such estimates is received, it is called 
"excess of revenue over estimates," and up to 
the close of 1870, these sums were i^aid into the 
Sinking Fund, which is now called the "Old Sink- 
ing Fund," which was established by an ordinance 
of 1843. 

At the close of 1870 it was thought by those who 
had examined the subject, that the Sinking Fund 
thus created was growing much too fast, and a 
new ordinance was passed, which will be touched 
upon hereafter. 

When this ordinance of 1870 was passed, and 
which has since been supplemented in all its es- 
sential particulars, so far as creating a Sinking 
Fund is concerned, by a State law, the city debt, 
exclusive of the water debt, was $14,166,789.80, to 
which there has been added, by the annexation of 
Charlestown, West Roxbury and Brighton, and by 
the city loans previously authorized, but not nego- 
tiated, $2,680,940.06, making the total, April 30, 
1876, which has not been since changed, $16,847,- 
729.86, to be paid from the old Sinking Fund. In 
the division of that existing Sinking Fund, $8,199,- 
1.54.73 belonged to this fund, $1,100,000 to the Co- 
chituate Water Sinking Fund, and $212,244.26 to 
the Consolidated Street Improvement Sinking 
Fund. 

The proceeds of the sale of city lands and street 
betterments upon improvements that are paid for 
directly from taxation, and the interest on its in- 



108 



BOARD OF ALDER M. EN, 



vested funds, go to this fundj and will be sufficient 
to i^ay the debt as it matures without the assist- 
ance of direct taxation. This fund has not, since 
1870, been aided by direct taxation, neither has 
any money been raised in that way to pay matur- 
ing debts chargeable to it. This fund has a large 
amount of debt to pay, maturing within three 
years. 

Consolidated Street Improvement Sterling Sink- 
%ng Fund. 

In 1869 the City Council authorized a foreign 
loan of £800,000, thirty years to run, to carry out 
the contemplated widening of Hanover street, 
laying out of Atlantic avenue, improvement of 
Fort Hill, and raising the Church-street district. 
By the terms of this loan all the betterments and 
proceeds of sales of remainders of surrendered 
estates collected from these works were to be set 
apart and invested as a Sinking Fund to redeem 
the debt. The terms of the contract with the 
Messrs. Baring Brothers of London were that 
£8000 should be redeemed annually, at a price 
not exceeding par; and, further, that the city 
should pay the full interest upon the whole sum 
borrowed for the entire term of thirty years, 
thus making the annual interest £40,000; but that 
portion of the interest paid upon debt cancelled is 
to be used in purchasing and cancelling debt. The 
amount wliich will have been paid at the maturity 
of the loan in this way will be some £240,000 in in- 
stalments and about £250,000 in interest. The 
Sinking Fund, after paying the required instal- 
ments, now amounts to'$l, 219,929.29, to which, un- 
der the terms of the Barings' contract, $200,000 to 
$300,000 more will be added. The fund will be 
greater than its purposes require, but there seems 
to be no proper method of diverting its natural 
accretions from it, as the terms of the contract 
with the lenders would not seem to allow such 
action on the city's part. The experience of this 
contract and loan, with the other causes before 
mentioned, led to the ordinance of 1870. Taxation 
on account of this fund has ceased. 

Mystic t'Vater Sinkinr/ Fund. 

This fund has been created up to this time by 
the excess of revenue over expenses, and until 
this year has been sufficient to meet the debt as it 
matured. During the past year it became entirely 
exhausted, and the Sinking Fund Commissioners 
have had to aid it to the extent of $25,152.96, to 
meet maturing loans. The future earnings of the 
Mystic Water Works are somewhat uncertain, but 
it is probable that the excess of revenue over the 
expenses of carrying on the works and paying the 
interest on the outstanding debt will with its ac- 
cumulations be sufficient to meet the debt here- 
after at maturity. The commissioners will not 
ask for taxation for this fund this year. 

Sinking Funds under Ordinance of Dec, 1870. 

These are the Cochituate Water, Burnt District, 
Sterling, and New Sinking Funds, which last 
comprises all the loans made since for street im- 
provements (except those in the Burnt District), 
public buildings, raising Suffolk and Northamp- 
ton street districts. The Burnt District Fund was 
separated from that of the New Sinking Fund on 
account of the implication in the negotiation with 
the Messrs. Barings of London that it should be a 
separate one. 

The processes by which the three last-mentioned 
funds are accumulated are entirely different from 
those employed with the funds first noted. It is 
by direct taxation. No revenue has, as yet, been 
received from the Cochituate Water Works. By 
the 1870 ordinance the city was required to raise 
annually by taxation one and a half per cent, of 
the amount of a thirty-year loan, three per cent, 
of the amount of a twenty-year loan, and six per 
cent, of a ten-year loan, for payment to the Sink- 
ing Fund Commissioners. These' amounts, with 
tlie interest on them, properly invested, were 
deemed ample to pay the debt at its maturity. By 
this method the burden of the taxation for it was 
evenly distributed over the entire term of the 
loan. The recent State law fixes the rate at eight 
per cent, on the amount of a ten-year loan, and 
allows the Sinking Fund Commissioners to adjust 
the percentages for the twenty and thirty-year 
loans, which have been established by them at 
three and a half per cent, on the former and two 
per cent, on the latter class of loans. It will be 
seen by this process that the revenues from bet- 
terments and surrendered estates are not made a 
part of the sinking funds, but, as soon as paid 
into the treasury are used directly in reducing 
the debt. And this is the radical difference be- 
tween us in the discussion of this question. 



If I have made myself understood, it will be seen 
that these several funds have been based upon en- 
tirely different principles. The ordinance that ex- 
isted when a loan was created became a part of the 
contract between the city and its creditor. But it 
would seem from the data upon which the Com- 
mittee on Retrenchment base their reasoning, 
that their course would be in violation of these 
contracts as well as the statute law, to pool all 
these funds in one. They seem to be striving after 
a process by which the whole city debt can be paid 
as it matures without further burden to the tax- 
payer, assuming assets of an entirely problemati- 
cal nature, for the receipt of which the future 
gives no certain promise or security. Does any 
mind fail to perceive the advantages of following 
in the well-ascertained path in this matter, which 
has to show the careful and successful administra- 
tion of the city's finances attained by these com- 
missioners of these funds, to turning to a course 
of what is, as yet, a questionable and merely theo- 
retical line of action ? 

The Mequirements of the Sinking Fund Com- 
missioners. 

Having briefly as possible given a i>lain state- 
ment of the workings of our financial system as 
applicable to the redemption of the debt of the 
city, I proceed to the question immediately before 
us. Taking it for granted, for the sake of the ar- 
gument, that the policy of the Retrenchment 
Committee will be adopted, of using the balances 
to relieve taxation, and directing" all moneys re- 
ceived from betterments, etc., to be paid into the 
Sinking Funds, thereby stopping the paying and 
cancelling debt before maturity, will there be a 
sufficient amount of income received by the com- 
missioners from those sources to enable them to 
give the funds the per centages required by law ? 

The i^ercentage requirements of law are as fol- 
lows: 

Burnt District Sinking Fund §206,958.00 

New Sinking Fund 400,135.00 

Cochituate Water Sinking Fund 230,854.00 

Total for the three funds 8837,947.00 

It will be seen that only three of the six funds 
require taxation. The committee, in their report, 
say that the average annual requirements of the 
Sinking Funds is $1,511,868, of which I8;800,000 will 
be derived from interests on investments. The 
difficulty with the report of the Committee on 
Retrenchment is that they have treated the sub- 
ject in the aggregate, instead of taking into view 
the wants of each fund separately. The largest 
portion of this interest belongs to the Old Sinking 
Fund. 

Now, the question is, how is this amount of 
$837,947 to be raised for the commissioners, with- 
out the balances of appropriations of this year, 
and the commissioners not using the proceeds 
from betterments, etc., to purchase and cancel 
debt before maturity. 

There will be received by the commissioners 
from excess of license revenue over expendi- 
tures at the close of the year, say, $125,000, and 
the City Council, by order, have expressly directs 
ed that it shall be used for purchasing and can- 
celling debt. 

It is estimated by the Auditor, that it will not be 
safe to calculate on more than $75,000 from the ex- 
cess of income and taxes over estimated income 
and taxes, April 30, 1877; it may, however, exceed 
that sum. 

The whole amount of outstanding bonds and 
betterment assessments, the proceeds from which 
are to be paid to the Sinking Fund Commission- 
ers, is included in the following table : 
Public land and Street Improvement and other Bonds. 

Due. 

1864 ....: §11,919.75 

1867..... .:; 500.06 

1870 250.00 

1871 1,228.00 

1872 5,944.00 

1873 10,798.25 

1874 15,013.25 

1875 25,771.(57 

1876 95,128.53 

1877 : 110,511.45 

1878 314,546.49 

1879 90,546.56 

1880 66,257.81 

1881 54,709.18 

1882 50,966.28 

1883 19,327.95 

1884 1,590.45 

1885 1,204.45 

1886 920.45 

§877,134.42 



FEBRUARY 



36 



1877 



109 



Of the bonds there are pledged as follows: 
To the old Sluicing l-'uud, Public Land and 

other bonds $314,999.31 

Consolidated Street Improvement SterHng 

Sinking Fimd 239,575.50 

Cochituate Water Works Sinking Fund.. 3,088.00 

§557,562.81 
Leaving $319,571.61 belonging; to the Sinking 
Funds requiring taxation, viz. : the Burnt District 
Sinking Fund and the New Sinking Fund. Of 
this amount not more than one-half can he relied 
upon to be paid during the coming year. 

Betterments, Feh. 1, 1877. 

Outstanding. In suit. 

Old Sinking Fund §117,705.48 $55,437.36 

Burnt District Fund.... 417,756.39 307,233.37 
Street improvements... 438,091.57 315,903.37 
Consolidated Street im- 
provement 187,021.34 28,900.00 

§1,160,574.78 §707,474.10 
Of the above amount there has been apportioned 
to be paid in the several years mentioned helow— 
Outstanding. In suit. 

1876 §95,312.25 §68,084.36 

1877* 165,152.50 71,653.43 

1878 7,601.35 

1879...... 1,378.01 

§269,444.11 §139,737.79 

* Probably will not be paid until after the close of 
the financial year 1877-78. 

These tables show that the total amount of rev- 
enue to be derived from the source of betterments, 
the payment of the same covering several years, 
amount to $1,160,574.78, and of that amount $707,- 
474.10 is in suit at law, leaving only $453,120.08, 
from v?hich receipts are to be depended upon f pr 
the coming year. 

These sources of revenue are very uncertain, as 
my friend, the Alderman from Ward 21, who is 
Chairman of the Committee on Public Lands, well 
knows ; for through his committee land bonas to a 
large amount, received from sales of pvrblic lands 
and estates in the SufEoik-street District, have 
been cancelled and the land taken possession of 
bv the city. There have been no sales of land by 
the city for two years past of any amount. 

The amount which the commissioners can rely 
upon for a certainty as being the receipts from 
these sources, outside of those pledged to the Old 
Sinking and Consolidated Street Improvement 
Sterling Fund during the coming financial year 
1877-78, for the percentages required by law, 
should not be placed at more than $.300,000; this 
sum, with the $75,000 from the excess of income 
and taxes, will give $375,000 to meet the require- 
ment, $837,947— leaving .$462,947 to be met by taxa- 
tion. 

Having been at much pains to ascertain the 
actual facts in the case, I deemed it of the utmost 
importance that they should be laid before the 
Board to guide us in our action, as we all believe 
that our credit should be maintained. That is the 
point, Mr. Mayor. If these balances are carried 
forward and deducted from the appropriations 
for the coming year, it leaves $462,947 to be raised 
by taxation to keep up the Sinking Fund as re- 
quired by the statutes of Massachusetts, and to 
meet the obligations we have entered into with 
the parties from whom we have borrowed money. 
No member of this Board will go further than my- 
self in relieving the taxpayer, at this time of con- 
tinued depression, of any burden that I can right- 
fully, and at the same time comply with the law 
and preserve the credit of our city. I think I 
have clearly shown that if the commissioners do 
not receive the balances of appropriation this 
year, and they are required to stop the purchase 
and cancellation of debt before maturity, with 
revenue not belonging to the Siukina- Funds, they 
will require taxation to meet the deficiency in the 
moneys which they will receive from the better- 
ments, as before mentioned. 

I therefore do not think, as I have before indi- 
cated, that a change should be made at this time 
in the policy which has been i)ursued since 1834, 
of closing up the annual appropriation accounts 
and paying the balances into the Sinking Funds 
for the redemption of the debt of the city. This 
closing of the annual accounts and disposing of 
the balances has also been considered a barrier to 
extravagance in expenditures. 

By making a change a benefit does not always 
follow, and in this case I think it will be a change 
merely for a change, with no commensurate bene- 
fit. This is to be deprecated at all times. I trust 



that the ordinance will not pass — it ought not to 
pass. 

Thus, Mr. Mayor, I have endeavored to give a 
history of the Sinking Funds and a statement of 
their present condition. If the city can judiciotis- 
ly and wisely turn the balances of this year into 
the apiiropriations of next year, if it can be done 
with safety, and thereby prevent a direct tax of 
$800,000, which is about the amount of the balance 
of the appropriation, I certainly shall notobject to 
it. I have given a statement of the facts as T be- 
lieve they exist, precisely; and it seems to me 
that there is no question but, if the order is 
adopted, that a direct tax of over $460,000 will be 
required this j'ear to keep the Sinking Funds 
up to the amount required by law. Therefore I 
still hope that the ordinance will be referred to 
the Finance Committee, or that it will not be 
adopted. 

Alderman Fitzgerald— I am glad to know that 
not $800,000 will be required, but $400,000. That 
is so much saved. Now, sir, the Alderman said 
that in the report of the committee we gave the 
aggregate amount of the debt, and upon that 
aggregate based the amount which should 
be raised yearly; and that we did not take 
separately each and eveiy one of the funds, and 
credit to each of them the amount which is neces- 
sary to be raised on each to pay the interest on 
the debt and also a sufficient amount to meet the 
debt at maturity. He said in addition that the 
cancellation of bonds was an excellent thing. The 
debt cancelled the past year is as follows ; 
Statement of the Debt Cancelled from May 1, 1876, to 
Feb. 21, 1877. 

§4,000 Due in 1882-83 

12,000 " 1885-86 

9,000 " 1890-91 

369,000 " 1891-92 

62,000 " 1892-93 

9,000 " 1893-94 

271,000 " 1894-95 



§736,000 

We have paid this year $736,000 of debt that will 
not be payable till fifteen or twenty years from 
now; and in addition to all that, you have paid in- 
terest into the Sinking Funds to meet all the 
other immatured debt. It that could be done in the 
three months of this year that have elapsed, I ask, 
Whv cannot the Sinking Fund Commissioners do 
without $800,000 next year, and not cancel any 
debt, and allow it to run, so that for the next 
twenty years the people who live in 1893, 
1895 and 1897 shall bear their propor- 
tionate share of the taxes to meet this 
debt at maturity? I go further and say that 
the Sinking Fund Commissioners have no authori- 
ty in law to cancel any of the debt; that what 
they have been doing is in violation of law ; that 
there is no authority vested in them to cancel a 
single cent of the debt of this city; and in order 
to confirm my ideas about it, here is a letter from 
the City Solicitor : 

City Solicitor's Office, ) 
2 Pembebton Square, 
Boston, Feb. 26, 1877. ) 

Sir— In reply to the question you proposed to 
me, namely, "Whether the Sinking Fund Com- 
missioners have authority in law to buy and can- 
cel bonds of the city of Boston, either before, at or 
after maturity ; and if so, does the law require the 
Sinking Fund to be in any, and in what condi- 
tion?" I respectfully submit the following opin- 
ion: 

The Sinking Fund Commission was originally 
established, and its powers and duties defined, by- 
ordinance. There being then no statute requiring 
such a commission, or the providing of such a 
fund, it was competent for the City Council to 
create, in its discretion, a Sinking Fund Commis- 
sion, and to invest it with such powers, not con- 
travening any law, as it should deem expedient. 
In the year 1870 the City Council did establish by 
ordinance a Sinking Fund Commission, and among 
the powers conferred upon it was that of purchas- 
ing or paying with the funds in its possession any 
part of the capital of the debt of the city, in the 
manner it might from time to time deem expe- 
dient. This ordinance stands now unrepealed by 
any action of the City Council. 

But in the j^ear 1875 the statute was enacted, en- 
titled "An Act to Regulate and Limit Municipal 
Indebtedness," which requires the establishment 
of a Sinking Fund Commission, and a Sinking 
Fund or funds ; provides for the election of com- 
missioners, and defines their powers and duties. 
This statute and the said oidinance are not in en- 
tire harmony, and the provisions of the ordinance 



110 



BOAB. D OF ALDERlVtElN. 



are annulled by the statute so tar as they are in 
conflict with it. The statute provides in section 5, 
that "the commissioners shall receive all sums 
contributed to a sinking fund and invest and re- 
invest the same, and the income thereof as it 
shall accrue, in the name of the Board, in the par- 
ticular scrip, notes or bonds for the redemption 
of which such Sinking Fund was established," or 
in other securities which are therein enumerated; 
and the ordinance provides that "whenever any 
debt to be paid from the Sinking Fund becomes 
due, the commissioners shall furnish the treasur- 
er, from the funds in their care, for said payment, 
the sum required, or so n\uch as shall be to the 
credit of said debt or loan." 

The commissioners then, in my judgment, have 
no right to pay and cancel any bond of the city at 
anytime. If a bond matures* in their possession, 
their duty is to collect it and reinvest the amount. 
They are trustees to hold and manage the funds 
put into their care, but have no powei- of api:ro- 
priation. When a fund is needed for the purpose 
for which it was created, they are to pay it to the 
treasurer, and can have no further control or di- 
rection of it. 

The payment of the city bonds, or of any of 
them, can be anticipated only b.v the action of the 
City Council. 

I am, very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

J. P. Healy. 
The act referred to is the one under which they 
claim the right to tax the citizens of Boston 8 per 
cent, on 10-year bonds, 2 percent, on .30-year bonds, 
and insist that it shall be done. That is the act 
they have been violating. So that, sir, the Sink- 
ing Fund Commissioners have been accumulating 
this money received from all sovirces. It was, as 
I said, the omnium gatherum into which every- 
thing went. They have been paying interest on 
the debt, to be sure. Everything went along 
so swimmingly, so much money has gone in, 
that they do not see how they can get along now 
in the way the law provides. We simply made 
this report so that for next year at least — while 
real estate yields no more than four per cent, on 
the original investment— we shall get alon^ as 
economically as possible; and so that the Sink- 
ing Fund Commissioners shall cancel no more 
debt and shall take no more from the 
citizens of Boston than is actually necessary 
to pay the actual interest on the debt, with a suffi- 
cient sum laid aside from year to year to pay the 
debt at matviriiy. Kow to my point : The gen- 
tleman said that we had not given the Sink- 
ing Funds separately, and the amount required 
for each fund. 1 have here a detailed state- 
ment of each fund, amount necessary to be raised 
each year in order to pay the interest on the out- 
standing indebtedness, and the amount required 
by law to be laid aside to meet the debt at ma- 
turity. 

Statement of tlie Sinking Funds on the Z\st day of Janu- 
ary, V&ll. This Estimate of receipts does hot include 
Revenue from Betterments, Sales of Public Lands, lA- 
rjuor Licenses, and Rents, for February, March, and 
April, 1S17, and from April 30, ISn, to April 30, 1878, 
Old SJnkmg Fund ; 

Debt, average due In eight years gl3,402,270.60 

Less Bonds held by this Fund 8,914,675.00 

Balance of Debt to be iirovided for ^4,578,595.60 

Sum sufficient, with its accumulation, 
to extinguish the debt at maturity, 
for 15 months, to April 30, 1878 ^597,220.47 

Cash on hand .Jan. 31, 1877, and esti- 
mated amount of interest to be re- 
ceived up to April 30, 1878 §1,789,574.72 

Consolidated Street Improvement Sinking Fund (Han- 
over Street, Atlantic Avenue, and Fort Hill) : 

Debt, average due in 22 years ;?3,516,586.86 

Less Bonds held by this Fund 1,114,000.00 

Balance of Debt to be provided f or. . . . )ii2,402,586,86 

Sum sufficient, with its accumulation, 
to extinguish the debt at maturity, 
for 15 months, to April 30, 1878 $84,317.76 

Cash on hand .Jan. 31, 1877, and esti- 
mated amount of interest to be re- 
ceived vip to April 30, 1878 §214,996.14 

Burnt District Sinking Fund : 

Debt, average due in 17 years §5,935,103.73 

Less Bonds held by this Fund 636,000.00 

Balance of Debt to be provided for. . . . §5,299,103.73 

Sum sufficient, with its accumvilatlou, 
to extinguish the debt at maturity, 
for 15 months, to April 38, 1878. . . 268,260.07 

Cash on hand Jan. 31, 1877, and esti- 
mated amount of interest to be re- 
ceived up to April 30, 1878 §361,549.42 



New Sinking Fund (Street-improvement Sinking Fund. 
Suffolk-street District ana Public Buildings) : 

Debt, average due in 14 years §8,915,000.00 

Less Bonds field by this fund 1,276,000.00 

Balance of Debt to be provided tor §7,039.000.00 

Sum sufficient, with its accumulation, 
to extinguish the debt at maturity, 
for 15 months, to April .SO, 1878 §501.977.79 

Cash on hand .Jan. 31, 1877, and esti- 
mated amount of interest to be re- 
ceived up to April 30, 1878 §760,278.74 

Cochituate Water Sinking Fund : 

Debt, average due in 22 years §11,548,711.11 

Less Bonds held by this Fund 1,430,000.00 

Balance of Debt to be provided for. .. .§10,118,711.11 
Sum sufficient, with its accumulation, 
to extinguish the debt at maturity, 

for 15 months, to April 30, 1878 §355,110.00 

Cash on hand .Jan. 31, 1877, and esti- 
mated amount of interest to be re- 
ceived up to April 30. 1878 *§716,01fi.23 

*This amount includes premium on 
sales of Water Loans, Oct. 1, 1875, §1.- 
000,000; April 1,1876, §552,000; Oct. 1, 
1876, §2 ,000,000 -§363,456.80; which 
now stands to the credit of Additional 
Supply of Water and Water Works, 
Wards 17 and 19. 

Mystic Water Sinking Fund: 

Debt, average due in 11 years §1,249,000.00 

Sum sufficient, with its accumulation, 
to extinguish the debt at maturity, 

for ] 5 months, to April 30, 1878 §112,567.12 

Cash on hand .Jan. 31, 1877. and esti- 
mated amount of interest to be re- 
ceived up to April 30, 1878 t§67 ,259.00 

tThis amount Includes the estimated 
revenue from Mystic Water Works, 
April 30, 1877, §65,000. No debt due 
on the fund af